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  #11  
Old 04-25-2012, 12:02 AM
Rhaven Blaack's Avatar
Rhaven Blaack Rhaven Blaack is offline
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I have followed your work and have to say that you have made some very interesting models. Granted, I have not built any of them yet do to other projects that I am currently testing for another designer (as well as a few that I have been meaning to do for quite a while now), but none the less you do produce very interesting models.

Now to give you my thoughts on your questions.

1) What constitutes an acceptable model?

(Like everyone has said before) A model that is build able and does not need to be tweaked or altered to "MAKE"the parts fit properly.


2) What is an appropriate scale, or size? (I will not put out tiny models).

It really depends on the subject of the model, and really what you feel comfortable with for that model in question.

3) What file type is most acceptable?

It seems that the most common (and acceptable) file types are PDF, PDO, and JPEG
I personally prefer PDF and JPEG files, but I can use PDO (even though I really do not like PDO).
I would stick with those three

4) What File size is appropriate?

I think that really depends mostly on the amount of texture detail that you want in your models. Like what was mentioned earlier, you would not want to make a 200 meg toaster model.
If you have a very detailed model (i.e.) the Galactica, then you would want to use a higher file size to add the detail.

You are an intelligent person, use your own judgement in this case.

5) How detailed should directions be? I've went so far as to create step by step directions and create movies showing exactly how to build something and still people complain....????

A general step by step is good as well as paying a little more attention to any tricky or difficult parts that may need extra attention.

Also have someone test your models for any problems that need to be fixed before release.

Just remember one thing, in the end you always have the final say as to how your models will turn out.
If someone does not like your work and can not point out a legitimate problem with your model (i.e. parts not fitting properly, file incomplete, or what ever else), then they do not need to build your models.

In closing, I would just like to say, I look forward to seeing more of your work and good luck with all that you do.
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  #12  
Old 04-25-2012, 01:01 AM
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Vortex_4200 Vortex_4200 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptune View Post

3) What file type is most acceptable?
I have to say that the PDO file format is the one I like, then I do not need directions, I simply look at the PDO model rotate it and look at whatever part I have a question about and then put it together.
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  #13  
Old 04-25-2012, 03:50 AM
Millenniumfalsehood Millenniumfalsehood is offline
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It's been answered several times, but I feel the need to respond anyway. Sue me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptune View Post
1) What constitutes an acceptable model?

2) What is an appropriate scale, or size? (I will not put out tiny models).

3) What file type is most acceptable?

4) What File size is appropriate?

5) How detailed should directions be? I've went so far as to create step by step directions and create movies showing exactly how to build something and still people complain....????
1) A model that is buildable. For me, this translates to a model which is at least capable of being assembled into something which resembles the intended subject, and that means sometimes I don't feel the need to correct models I unfold from computer games. They are just too close to being ready as-is to be worth hunting for every intersection. Sometimes this doesn't work, but most of the time I get complimented on my models because I choose ones which I know can be built with a minimum of work reshaping parts.

2) This greatly depends on the person, but I've found that between 8 and 18 inches to be pretty commonly accepted. Some go for larger, and some prefer smaller, but this is where the middle of the curve generally lies. The reason is that this is that 12 inches is a common shelf width, and if you angle an 18 inch model it can fit on the shelf while still having a decent profile.

3) PDFs, PDOs, and image files, in that order. Scalability is the primary reason I hear. PDFs are slightly more popular because they don't require you to download special software. Do NOT stave in JPEG, though! It is notorious for losing color information, which muddies the image and makes text harder to read. Use PNG instead. It takes more memory, but it is a lossless format.

4) Anything, really. Nobody has complained yet about my 19 MB Moldy Crow file.

5) It depends on how intuitive your model is. Usually, Pepakura is sufficient, because it can point out where each piece goes and how it's unfolded. If your using PDFs, then a set of instructions goes a long way. Just including some step-by-step pictures is fine. The Grissom model by Martin Sanger had only pictures to go by, and they were fine for the task. Just an exploded diagram was included in the Bird of Prey on Billy's Star Trek site, and I had no problem assembling that, either. Always try to beta-test your models, though. Have someone build them and send you notes and corrections before you put the model out there. It is totally worth it, though not everyone does it. I don't usually, because I have a high 3D perception and can "build" a model by sight. You might be able to do this, too. But at least consider doing it. I have had some of my more complicated models beta-tested, and they turned out better for it.

Bottom line: there will always be complainers. You can please some people some of the time, but you can never please everybody every time. So don't try. Deal with the ones with questions, but follow your gut and learn from experience. If someone complains, respond with, "You don't like it? Make your own."
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  #14  
Old 04-25-2012, 03:55 AM
thorst thorst is offline
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Personally, I think that a good model kit constitutes of the parts as well as of some kind of instructions. It doesn't need to show each single part glued on in an own step, but at least the most important sub-assemblies with the part's numbers. If the kit needs to be printed on a special paper weight for good fit, it should be noted.

Paper modeling, the actual building as well as designing, needs patience. At the risk of making myself unpupular, I see a lot of paper models out there which were and will probably never be build by anyone because the designer rushed through the process too impatiently. So in the end, the few hours spent on making basic instructions are a good investment.

Thorsten
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  #15  
Old 04-25-2012, 07:19 AM
Neptune Neptune is offline
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I've covered most of this in previous posts, but will reiterate some here. The models that I released early in my learning to do this have been for the most part reworked and reworked again. I haven't put out any new models until just recently and they are so simple that a 13 yr old girl could figure them out.

I haven't got to redoing all of the models and have in fact gotten fatigued from reworking the previous versions. I want to move on and if people can't make the attempt to try and puzzle them out, they should not make the attempt to build them.

I've had thousands of downloads of the models that I've developed and I know someone is building them, they just aren't sharing here.

Within the last few months I've made every attempt to make the models better and to show directions, but as someone said... People will complain..??

I often and for the most part try to make both the pdf and pdo versions available.

I really don't know how I can take any more time to do any more to make it any clearer to some people. I have two models in the build phase right now, but have not posted photos and will not until they are done.

I'm currently building the TOS Communications Console and the 24" Viper and will provide both directions and movies.

The simple fact is that I can develope these models from scratch, or from ripped game models, or CG models faster than I can build them and to be brutally honest, I do have a life and things to do outside of here.

I really hope that people will have a little more patience as I continue to make models and feel out the masses as to what they want and try to comply.

Frankly, this is not freaking Rocket Science, it's a "Glue Tab-A to Part-B" science and I really get tired on the complainers.

Thank you for your input and comments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhaven Blaack View Post
I have followed your work and have to say that you have made some very interesting models. Granted, I have not built any of them yet do to other projects that I am currently testing for another designer (as well as a few that I have been meaning to do for quite a while now), but none the less you do produce very interesting models.

Now to give you my thoughts on your questions.

1) What constitutes an acceptable model?

(Like everyone has said before) A model that is build able and does not need to be tweaked or altered to "MAKE"the parts fit properly.


2) What is an appropriate scale, or size? (I will not put out tiny models).

It really depends on the subject of the model, and really what you feel comfortable with for that model in question.

3) What file type is most acceptable?

It seems that the most common (and acceptable) file types are PDF, PDO, and JPEG
I personally prefer PDF and JPEG files, but I can use PDO (even though I really do not like PDO).
I would stick with those three

4) What File size is appropriate?

I think that really depends mostly on the amount of texture detail that you want in your models. Like what was mentioned earlier, you would not want to make a 200 meg toaster model.
If you have a very detailed model (i.e.) the Galactica, then you would want to use a higher file size to add the detail.

You are an intelligent person, use your own judgement in this case.

5) How detailed should directions be? I've went so far as to create step by step directions and create movies showing exactly how to build something and still people complain....????

A general step by step is good as well as paying a little more attention to any tricky or difficult parts that may need extra attention.

Also have someone test your models for any problems that need to be fixed before release.

Just remember one thing, in the end you always have the final say as to how your models will turn out.
If someone does not like your work and can not point out a legitimate problem with your model (i.e. parts not fitting properly, file incomplete, or what ever else), then they do not need to build your models.

In closing, I would just like to say, I look forward to seeing more of your work and good luck with all that you do.
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  #16  
Old 04-25-2012, 07:22 AM
Neptune Neptune is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vortex_4200 View Post
I have to say that the PDO file format is the one I like, then I do not need directions, I simply look at the PDO model rotate it and look at whatever part I have a question about and then put it together.
That's why I try to make both the pdo and pdf available.
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  #17  
Old 04-25-2012, 07:23 AM
Neptune Neptune is offline
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I've covered all of this in previous posts. Thanks for your input.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Millenniumfalsehood View Post
It's been answered several times, but I feel the need to respond anyway. Sue me.



1) A model that is buildable. For me, this translates to a model which is at least capable of being assembled into something which resembles the intended subject, and that means sometimes I don't feel the need to correct models I unfold from computer games. They are just too close to being ready as-is to be worth hunting for every intersection. Sometimes this doesn't work, but most of the time I get complimented on my models because I choose ones which I know can be built with a minimum of work reshaping parts.

2) This greatly depends on the person, but I've found that between 8 and 18 inches to be pretty commonly accepted. Some go for larger, and some prefer smaller, but this is where the middle of the curve generally lies. The reason is that this is that 12 inches is a common shelf width, and if you angle an 18 inch model it can fit on the shelf while still having a decent profile.

3) PDFs, PDOs, and image files, in that order. Scalability is the primary reason I hear. PDFs are slightly more popular because they don't require you to download special software. Do NOT stave in JPEG, though! It is notorious for losing color information, which muddies the image and makes text harder to read. Use PNG instead. It takes more memory, but it is a lossless format.

4) Anything, really. Nobody has complained yet about my 19 MB Moldy Crow file.

5) It depends on how intuitive your model is. Usually, Pepakura is sufficient, because it can point out where each piece goes and how it's unfolded. If your using PDFs, then a set of instructions goes a long way. Just including some step-by-step pictures is fine. The Grissom model by Martin Sanger had only pictures to go by, and they were fine for the task. Just an exploded diagram was included in the Bird of Prey on Billy's Star Trek site, and I had no problem assembling that, either. Always try to beta-test your models, though. Have someone build them and send you notes and corrections before you put the model out there. It is totally worth it, though not everyone does it. I don't usually, because I have a high 3D perception and can "build" a model by sight. You might be able to do this, too. But at least consider doing it. I have had some of my more complicated models beta-tested, and they turned out better for it.

Bottom line: there will always be complainers. You can please some people some of the time, but you can never please everybody every time. So don't try. Deal with the ones with questions, but follow your gut and learn from experience. If someone complains, respond with, "You don't like it? Make your own."
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  #18  
Old 04-25-2012, 07:25 AM
Neptune Neptune is offline
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Thanks for your input. Please see the video in the link and Keep on Trekkin!
=/\=

1 to 1 Hand Crafted Cylon WIP Movie 1.wmv - YouTube

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorst View Post
Personally, I think that a good model kit constitutes of the parts as well as of some kind of instructions. It doesn't need to show each single part glued on in an own step, but at least the most important sub-assemblies with the part's numbers. If the kit needs to be printed on a special paper weight for good fit, it should be noted.

Paper modeling, the actual building as well as designing, needs patience. At the risk of making myself unpupular, I see a lot of paper models out there which were and will probably never be build by anyone because the designer rushed through the process too impatiently. So in the end, the few hours spent on making basic instructions are a good investment.

Thorsten
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  #19  
Old 04-25-2012, 11:27 AM
Tapcho's Avatar
Tapcho Tapcho is offline
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Fine thread and thanks for starting it. Most of the things are already said but I'd like to make few notions - as a modeler, not a designer (other than my scratch built work). Scalability is important and the fact that the graphics follow too. Downsizing is not that big issue but blurry lines when building big sucks. Instructions are not that important. I always like when a designer suggests the assembly order and numbers the parts as per sequensing. Photos of the beta build help too. I think that's sufficent in most of the cases.

Tappi
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  #20  
Old 04-25-2012, 02:07 PM
thorst thorst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptune View Post
Thanks for your input. Please see the video in the link and Keep on Trekkin!
=/\=

1 to 1 Hand Crafted Cylon WIP Movie 1.wmv - YouTube
Yes, this is absolutely what I meant. It doesn't take too much time to do, but really helps the beginner a lot!

Thorsten
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