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  #1  
Old 02-05-2018, 04:28 AM
Cuttingmat Cuttingmat is offline
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Star Destroyer

Hello,
I just finished this Star Destroyer, hope you like it !
I turned the original white template into a black one, and added some greebles here and there.
Attached Thumbnails
Star Destroyer-p_20180204_211549.jpg   Star Destroyer-p_20180204_211618_1.jpg   Star Destroyer-p_20180204_211604.jpg  
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  #2  
Old 02-05-2018, 08:23 AM
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ennder ennder is offline
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Cool. A black SD would be hard to see in space.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:50 AM
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airdave airdave is offline
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I never could understand why the Enterprise was white...or light gray.
And why are spaceships in general painted white or a very light colour?

Its obviously not a natural metal finish...so you mean to tell me, someone painted this entire ship?
In space.
A ship the size of a small city.
Painted...in a vacuum?

Not only would it be expensive, tedious and epically difficult to paint something that big, in space,
its also completely unneccesary.
You don't need to see the ship in space.
Who is looking at it?...in space? lol

In fact, a dark coloured "stealthy" ship makes more sense.
Especially a battle ship.

I think a large ship like this Destroyer...or the Enterprise...or even 2001s Discovery,
would be darker colours, basically a lot of metal and base material finishes.

Although I do like the idea of the original Heart of Gold with a black finish so black that you couldn't see it even if you were touching it!
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:18 PM
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Mike1158 Mike1158 is offline
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I believe it would depend on the material the hull was made from and the manufacturing process. Is the Enterprise hull a standard metal as we would know it? Not so sure myself and in space you would only 'see' it close up anyway where blue light is more easily seen.
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Old 02-05-2018, 01:19 PM
JohnGay JohnGay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
Although I do like the idea of the original Heart of Gold with a black finish so black that you couldn't see it even if you were touching it!
Actually, that was Disaster Area's stunt ship that was so black you couldn't even feel it.

As for metal finishes on spaceships, either brushed stainless or any anodized finish makes sense rather than paint of any kind. And even though the vastness of space would make visual contact seem rare, you would still want something that was easily noticeable to sensors to avoid collision in heavy-traffic areas. Stealth isn't desirable if your approaching a heavily-trafficked space station.
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Old 02-05-2018, 01:40 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGay View Post
Actually, that was Disaster Area's stunt ship that was so black you couldn't even feel it.
yeah...I couldn't remember if the ship had a name.
I was going to dig out my old BBC tapes, to see, but couldn't be bothered.
So I did a quick search and Heart of Gold came up.
Didn't even think before I started typing.
LOL
I should know better.
You got the point.

"It's so ... black!" said Ford Prefect, "you can hardly make out its shape ... light just seems to fall into it!"
Zaphod said nothing. He had simply fallen in love.
The blackness of it was so extreme that it was almost impossible to tell how close you were standing to it.
"Your eyes just slide off it ..." said Ford in wonder. It was an emotional moment. He bit his lip.
Zaphod moved forward to it, slowly, like a man possessed - or more accurately like a man who wanted to possess.
His hand reached out to stroke it. His hand stopped. His hand reached out to stroke it again. His hand stopped again.
"Come and feel the surface," he said in a hushed voice.
Ford put his hand out to feel it. His hand stopped.
"You ... you can't ..." he said.
"See?" said Zaphod, "it's just totally frictionless. This must be one mother of a mover ..."


Visual stealth would not be an issue in a traffic situation.
As you say, sensors are used for tracking, not visual identification.
Sensors are sensors...no matter what colour your spaceship is.
A space station, with sensors, tracking and remote control wouldn't care what colour your ship is.

So, again, I say, if you are stupid enough to go to the trouble of painting your ship all one colour, then paint it black!
or better yet...Disaster Area Black.

What kind of camouflage is good in space?
Black with white polka dots?
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Old 02-05-2018, 01:46 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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Sorry, was this thread about something Star Wars?
lol
we can fix that.
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  #8  
Old 02-05-2018, 02:01 PM
cfuruti cfuruti is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingmat View Post
I turned the original white template into a black one, and added some greebles here and there.
Looks nice.Would you care to mention the source?
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  #9  
Old 02-06-2018, 12:53 AM
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luke strawwalker luke strawwalker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
I never could understand why the Enterprise was white...or light gray.
And why are spaceships in general painted white or a very light colour?

Its obviously not a natural metal finish...so you mean to tell me, someone painted this entire ship?
In space.
A ship the size of a small city.
Painted...in a vacuum?

Not only would it be expensive, tedious and epically difficult to paint something that big, in space,
its also completely unneccesary.
You don't need to see the ship in space.
Who is looking at it?...in space? lol

In fact, a dark coloured "stealthy" ship makes more sense.
Especially a battle ship.

I think a large ship like this Destroyer...or the Enterprise...or even 2001s Discovery,
would be darker colours, basically a lot of metal and base material finishes.

Although I do like the idea of the original Heart of Gold with a black finish so black that you couldn't see it even if you were touching it!
Spacecraft are typically white or have alternating black and white stripes (like Explorer 1 and other early satellites) or else they're covered in chrome or gold foil multi-layer kapton or mylar insulation to provide thermal control in space.

Since there's no air, which absorbs and scatters sunlight, as well as providing a means for heat to transfer and move around (objects immersed in the atmosphere will heat up in sunlight and then give up that heat by warming the air around them, which rises by convection and carries the heat away, moderating their temperature. NONE of those things occur in space... There's no atmosphere to absorb or scatter the harsh blazing sunlight, there's no atmosphere to warm up around parts that have gotten hot in the sun, absorbing some of the heat from them and carrying it away. Even if there is air on the back side of the hull or bulkhead, without gravity (or in microgravity, more correctly) there is no convection-- warm air does not rise and cool air does not descend because in "free fall" there's no "up or down"... so the air will form a thin, increasingly warm layer right up against the surface the air is touching (in perfectly calm air, anyway, unless there's a fan or circulator blowing and forcing the air to move and mix). Even radiators, which on Earth work as heat exchangers, drawing heat from a working fluid into the metal coils/fins and then dissipating that heat to the atmosphere via airflow, don't work in this "classical" sense in space-- radiators only work by literally "radiating" the heat away as infrared energy dissipated into space, a far less "efficient" process (from a cooling volume standpoint).

Then you have the effect of nearby objects or planetary bodies-- which radiate large amounts of heat back into space on the night side and reflect some back into space on the day side. So now you have TWO sources of heat nearby-- solar radiation, and the radiated heat energy from the "nearby" planet or moon. By coating the spacecraft in layers of shiny gold or silver multi-layer insulation like kapton or mylar, the incoming heat radiation can be "mostly" reflected away back into space, rather than being absorbed and heating up the spacecraft unnecessarily, heat which then usually must be removed by a working fluid (coolant) circulated around and passed through a radiator which then emits that heat as radiation back into empty space.

Of course, you want the spacecraft to absorb SOME heat, as in darkness (and distance from planetary bodies), cut off from these sources of heat, the structures tend to radiate their heat out into empty space and therefore get extremely cold, especially since there is no "moderating atmosphere" to retain or circulate warmth even in darkness. SO, that's why some early satellites and equipment that was not "actively" cooled had alternating black and white stripes on it (like Explorer 1)... the black absorbs heat, the white reflects it and radiates it away, keeping things in "equilibrium".

That is why they paint or adhere covering layers to spacecraft... and it makes sense that the Enterprise or Star Destroyers would similarly be "coated" in some form or fashion, even if it's not what we would think of as "paint" today... And in all likelihood these spacecraft would have been built in pressurize-able drydocks in space, not in the open vacuum of space itself... The Enterprise was supposed to have been constructed on Earth and then launched into space, at least as components that may have been joined together in orbit, at least that's what the backstory has indicated over the years. The Enterprise D from The Next Generation was constructed on Mars. Star Destroyers, we don't know as much about, but in some of the literature (probably non-canonical) it's been intimated they're constructed in various shipyards, such as on Coruscant or the Corellian shipyards...

Later! OL J R
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2018, 03:08 AM
PhantomCruiser PhantomCruiser is offline
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I can't remember which of the "expanded universe" books it was. But didn't General Iblis wind up with a Star Destroyer? He wanted a new look to it, as a way to personalize it, and was miffed that the only paint available in sufficiant quantity was ISD White. So, white it stayed.
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