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  #11  
Old 12-07-2018, 06:42 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Before I describe the next two buildings, just a note or two about a website I have mentioned before:

Carrera4Fun.de - Die Webseite fŁr den Carrera UNI 132 und Slotcar Fan

This German site is the motherlode for free, 1/32 scale slot car buildings. Many of the available structures are modern, computer-designed models of actual, vintage buildings and thatís just what I needed for my 1960s layout. Unfortunately, there is no English translation on the site, but that can be worked around with the help of Google Translate. I have always found the site to be difficult to navigate, but if you keep at it, its contents will slowly be revealed. Even if youíre not trying to fill out a slot car layout, there are plenty of interesting buildings that could serve many other purposes. Definitely worth the effort.

First up is the small garage, or as itís otherwise known, Boxe No. 610. It was originally issued by Carrera as, according to the website, a screen-printed, plastic model. The various plastic parts were scanned and used as the basis for the resulting paper model. As I remember, I enlarged the model a bit before I printed it out. Simple to build, the colorful garage has the true 1960s look I was going for. The Porsche sign on the roof and the logo on the wall are my own addition. The Ninco Porsche 356 has been under repair for years, and has taken up permanent residence inside the bay.

The second build is the huge Mšrklin Sprint Race Control Tower and Crosswalk. In England and America, the vintage plastic model was branded as Scalextric, and that is how I have always known it. Originally emblazoned with the word Dunlop on the towerís side, the carrera4fun model repeats this design. I wanted something a bit different, so I substituted the name of another tire manufacturer, Avon, in its place. Iíve always liked the jaunty Avon logo.

Designed to span four lanes of the more slender Scalextric track, I set my model askew over the two lanes of my wider Carrera track. The model is so large that I placed it at the furthest reaches of my layout. If it were up front, it would block the view of the rest of the track.

All the paper parts are backed with mat board to give the model some much-needed strength. Also, I designed my model so that it can be taken apart. The two towers can be pulled away from the crosswalk making the model easier to move for cleaning. The scratchbuilt flags atop the crosswalk were all taken from the internet and are flying from aluminum flagpoles.

Originals of this plastic model are hard to find in good condition, and expensive when you do find one. This large carrera4fun model adds a lot of personality to my layout, at minimum cost.

All for now.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-img_1634.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1809.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1811.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1813.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1815.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1606.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1895.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1891.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1885.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1893.jpg  

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  #12  
Old 12-14-2018, 06:55 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

A couple more scratchbuilt models this week, but this time Iím not copying vintage models from the past, these two buildings are of my own design. The first is a camera platform to elevate some of my 1/32 scale plastic figures above the fray. The design needed to be the narrow building you see in the photographs, as it had to fit into a pretty tight spot.

On the far end of my layout is a large, banked turn that recalls the famous Carousel turn found on the Nurburgring track. The real Carousel is a favorite spot to view a race, as the cars have to slow down for the massive curve and then make their way around what is essentially an automotive amphitheater. My track wound up with a narrow, curved, and empty space between the high-banked turn and the smaller radius turn inside it. This camera platform fills that space nicely.

Made of mat board and sitting on a wooden base, the first floor serves as an office and shelter for track officials. The real reason for the building is the camera platform above the office. Accessed by the painted brass ladder, the lucky plastic people standing atop the platform have the best possible view of the track.

The second scratchbuilt building seen below is the ticket booth. I hope I got the translation right when I put the sign on the roof. This was a much easier design and build than the previous camera platform. Again made from mat board, I incorporated two separate booths under one roof. To add a bit of color, I placed some appropriate flags on top. They are left to right, the State Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate, the National Flag of Germany and the Municipal Flag of NŁrburg. There are a lot of flags on my layout, and unless I bump one out of position, they all flutter in the same direction from a northerly breeze.

As a side note, most of the more than one hundred plastic figures are re-pops from old 1960s Monogram molds. Others are classic Scalextric people along with a few modern Chinese figures.

All for now,

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-img_1554.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1802.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1803.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1807.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1806.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1539.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1866.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1868.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1864.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1870.jpg  

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  #13  
Old 12-21-2018, 10:22 AM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Iím going to take a step away from the architecture theme of this thread and show a few of the paper vehicles Iíve built for my slot car layout. First up are the three racecar transporters available at:

Home of „āę„Éľ„ÉČ„ĀģŚÖĶťöä

To find the three transporters, locate the F1 1961-1965 listing at the top of the page, and scroll down to the bottom.

Along with some rather cartoonish pre-wing F1 paper cars, this site, also known as Ichiyamaís Paper Cards, offers some realistic 1/30 scale Bugatti Type 35s and a selection of accurate, 1/30 scale paper models of mini and micro cars of the past. The three transporters are a bonus and I was happy to find them.

The Team Lotus vehicle is typical of the custom made car transporters of the 1950s and 1960s. Seeing as you couldnít just drive your F1 car to the track, these transporters were the logical evolution from the trailers and flatbed trucks that were used prior to their introduction. More than just a hollowed out bus, these custom designed vehicles served not only as transportation for the thoroughbred racecars but also as a mobile shop and office. It was nice for the crews to have an enclosed place of their own to retreat to when on the road visiting the various tracks.

Printed out on my inkjet printer onto 110 lb. cardstock, all three transporters are heavily reinforced with mat board. The Lotus is designed to have a tailgate that lowers for loading the cars, but to insure strength, I built my Lotus with the tailgate sealed in place.

The Owen Racing Organization transporter is also known as the Leyland Royal Tiger Worldmaster LRT as well as the BRM Transporter. Inflated titles aside, the Owen transporter is a similar tailgate vehicle, but it was designed with a more angular look. Both the Lotus and Owen models include printed interiors that are meant to be installed inside the models, but again, my Owen is all sealed up in the name of strength. Iíve have these trucks in my collection for over eight years, and they are all holding up fine.

The final transporter is the most famous, the red Fiat 642 RN2. Built to carry three Ferrari racecars in the open, the original vehicle still exists today. Discovered as a barn find in 1988 and taken in hand, it was fully restored and now makes the rounds of Europeís famed tracks. Some of my photographs show my model Fiat carrying three Ferraris. Sadly, the cars appear to be somewhat oversized when placed on the transporter. Even though I printed out all three transporters as large as I could, they donít quite measure up to 1/32 scale. But, as they reside on the far side of the track, they are close enough.

After I finished the bodies of the trucks, I thought the wheels and tires of all three models were lacking, so I found some better examples on the net and used them in place of the originals. The three vehicles really add some color and history to the layout.

Finally, I built a pair of postwar CitroŽn trucks, a 2CV and an H van. I donít remember where I got them, but I scaled them to 1/32 to fit in with the rest of my layout.

All for now,

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-img_1639.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1831.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1840.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1839.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1841.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1830.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1834.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1833.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1843.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1838.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1835.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1842.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1837.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1846.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1850.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1872.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1881.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1880.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1877.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1878.jpg  

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  #14  
Old 12-21-2018, 11:26 AM
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Vermin_King Vermin_King is offline
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I imagine your track is really looking good about now
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  #15  
Old 12-22-2018, 05:55 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

And hi, VK, and thanks for following the thread. Attached find a photograph of the whole layout from a coupe of years ago. The left side looks a bit bare, but there are plans afoot to rectify the situation.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
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Slot Car Buildings-0913.jpg  
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  #16  
Old 12-28-2018, 07:35 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Just a couple of smalls this week, both of which are available from Carrera4fun.

Carrera4Fun.de - Die Webseite fŁr den Carrera UNI 132 und Slotcar Fan

The 55 gallon fuel and oil drums were a fun project for me. These were the first things I created on the computer by importing company logos and placing them onto the basic oil drum graphics provided by Carrera4fun. You can see that I went a little mad with my newfound know-how.

The drums on the roof of the pits building have already been discussed, and hereĎs another photograph of them. I also made some drums to fit into the bed of my diecast 1/32 Mack Bulldog flatbed truck. In keeping with the lack of safety concerns at the old Nurburgring track, Iíve also scattered some drums around the layout in dangerous places.

None of the drums are modeled on an actual prototype, they were just cobbled together using easily found logos placed in the center of the drums with appropriate corporate colors making up the rest of the drumís paint. The stacks are glued together to make moving and cleaning easier. There are nearly 40 drums on the layout.

As a side note, I printed out the racecarís makes and numbers that appear in the red, plastic Scalextric event board. Now the signs match actual cars on the layout. Hey, those signs are models too, right?

Also from Carrera4fun is the winnerís podium. The simple paper part looks like itís made from brick and is big enough to hold the winner and a couple of losers. The figures on the podium are ridiculously expensive Preiser figures, but they are beautifully done and Iím happy to have them. The podium is actually facing backwards, as the off side has the numbers for first, second and third place on number boards below the platforms. The black numbers are not properly centered in the white boards, so I chose not to display them. The black and white checkerboard piece of card under the mediaís feet is 1/12 scale dollhouse flooring.

Thatís about it for the paper models on my slot car layout. Thereís one more for next week.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-img_1902.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1684.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1668.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1855.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1853.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1728.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1913.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1910.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1919.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1916.jpg  

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  #17  
Old 12-29-2018, 01:02 AM
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Kevin WS Kevin WS is offline
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TD - all very nice!

Some great work there, and it seems like you have stumbled onto a winning formula with all the card buildings and accessories.

Now, how about some photos of the general layout?
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  #18  
Old 12-29-2018, 12:31 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

And hi, Kevin WS, and thanks for your comments and interest. Here are a few photographs of of the layout as requested. The paper buildings and smaller models play an important part in the overall look, and as most of them were free from the internet, they saved quite a bit of money, too.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-img_0897.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1713.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1708.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1588.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1724.jpg  

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  #19  
Old 12-29-2018, 02:42 PM
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Kevin WS Kevin WS is offline
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TB - thank you for the pics.

Tremendous - really really a great job there.

A real labour of love, but best of all it also looks like a real period piece!
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  #20  
Old 01-05-2019, 12:40 PM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

For years, I wanted a copy of the original, plastic Scalextric Control Centre, whose box can be seen in the first photograph below. But wherever I looked, the classic model was too scarce or too expensive for a guy on a paper model budget, if you know what I mean. So, there was nothing left to do but break out the hobby knife and scratchbuild one of my own. After my mat board Control Centre was completed and installed at the Start/Finish line, it was only then that I realized that the finished model was far too big. At three stories high and occupying an oversized footprint, I resolved to move it to the back of the layout, where both it and I would be happier. But what to do with the empty space?

As there were no classic-plastic models that would fill the bill, I decided to design and scratchbuild a new structure to occupy the spot. I took design cues from the original Control Centre, such as the zig-zag railings and control tower aerie. If my plans worked out, my two story building wouldnít obstruct the view of the layout and the footprint would be considerably smaller.

I call my finished building the Officialís Start House, as it sits comfortably on the layoutís Start/Finish line. Along with the Control Centreís distinctive railings and angled windows, I also included some mullioned portholes and flower boxes to further connect my design to the Scalextric model. I thought some walkways and a flat roof for a camera crew would look good, but the real purpose of the building was to provide the flagman with a small, overhanging balcony from which he could wave his green and checkered flags to start and end the race.

I was happy with the final appearance of the Start House, and a lot of its look is due to the material I used in its constructionÖmat board.

Iíve used picture framerís mat board for years as a backing material for thin cardstock, with a good example being one of the recently seen racecar transporters. A large, 10 inch model like the Team Lotus transporter, built without some interior stiffening, would quickly turn into a sloppy, wavy mess.

Mat board is also a perfect material to use in architectural models such as the Start House. The board comes in many colors and textures, and because it is designed to remain stable in most humidity and lighting conditions, it resists warping and fading. While it isnít easy to cut with a hobby knife, it can be done with a bit of effort and concentration. For example, the numerous right triangles in the railings were a chore to cut out, but I think the final result was worth the struggle.

Also, mat board has a peculiar trait. It can be delaminated. In other words, the colored paper coating on the boardís surface can be stripped away from the rest of the material and can be used as regular colored cardstock. For example, the red window surrounds and the green caps on the railing posts on the Start House are all made of paper stripped from the surface of mat board. There is no paint or ink on the model.

Sometimes when the paper is stripped away, there is only a small amount of fuzz on its backside and the paper is ready for use. Other times, there is quite a bit of paper fuzz residue and this can be scrapped away using a curved #10 or #22 blade in your hobby knife. This may take some time and effort, but you can wind up with colored and textured paper unavailable from any other source, such as the black, marbled paper seen on the plinth and coaming of the Start House.

You can find mat board at the big-box craft and hobby stores, but they really only stock basic, colored board with no texture. For more exotic board, Iíll visit picture framing stores and ask if I can look through their collection of cut-outs, the waste material that is removed to accommodate the artwork being framed. Picture framing produces a lot of waste mat board.

Well, thatís it for the paper models on my 1960s themed slot car layout. If it werenít for my scratchbuilt paper models and the freely available paper structures from Carrera4fun and other internet sources, I would have had to build a layout with a desert theme.

All for now,

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Slot Car Buildings-scalextric-k-703.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1597.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1534.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1742.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1751.jpg  

Slot Car Buildings-img_1744.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1749.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1796.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1799.jpg   Slot Car Buildings-img_1795.jpg  

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