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  #291  
Old 02-05-2019, 11:47 PM
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This is really fascinating Don. I'm sure I speak for all the fans of your write ups in saying thanks for going the extra mile with this one.

BTW last count 246 downloads of our PBY my friend.
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  #292  
Old 02-07-2019, 04:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Boose View Post
This post provides some additional information about the markings of Garry’s model of PBY-5, Bureau of Aeronautics Number (BuNo) 2291, and about the fate of the aircraft not included in my original write up (http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/aviation/41534-us-navy-usmc-between-wars-1-100-a-27.html#post662179).

In 1937, the Navy reorganized its aviation units, renumbered fleet squadrons, and revised the marking system for aircraft. On 1 July 1939, patrol aircraft were reorganized and patrol squadrons were renumbered so that within each patrol wing (PatWing), the first number of a squadron would reflect the wing number and the second number the patrol squadron (VP) within the wing. For example, the first squadron of PatWing One, was renumbered from VP-7 to VP-1; the second squadron became VP-12, and so on. VP-14 retained its number as the fourth squadron of PatWing One. The 1937 marking system was retained and applied as follows:

PatWing One aircraft were identified by a single vertical stripe on the rudder and a single span-wise stripe on the elevators; PatWing Two by double stripes; PatWing Three by a horizontal stripe on the rudder and a fore-and-aft stripe on each elevator; PatWing Four by double horizontal and fore-and-aft stripes; PatWing Five by solid colored rudder and elevators; PatWing Six by a checkered pattern on the rudder and elevators; and PatWing Seven by double vertical and span-wise stripes.

Individual squadrons within the patrol wings were identified by colors: first, Insignia Red; second, White; third, True Blue; fourth, Black; fifth, Willow Green; and sixth, Lemon Yellow.

Like fleet aviation units, pre-war patrol squadrons were organized into six three-plane sections that were identified within squadrons by colored engine cowls. The lead aircraft of each section (Aircraft 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, and 16) had the entire cowl in the section color; the second aircraft (2, 5, 8, 11, 14, and 17) had the top half of the cowl painted in the section color; and the third aircraft (3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18) had the bottom half of the cowl painted in the section color. The sequence of colors was the same as for the tail markings: first – Insignia Red; second – White; third – True Blue; fourth – Black; fifth – Willow Green; and sixth – Lemon Yellow.

With this in mind, we can identify Garry’s model by the markings: single vertical rudder stripe and single span-wise elevator stripes identify it as a PatWing One aircraft. That the stripes are black identifies it as an aircraft of VP-14 (fourth squadron of the wing). The number (11) and the black top halves of the engine cowls identify it as the second aircraft of the fourth section.

Some of these markings are visible in the color image from the VP-NAVY website, available at https://www.vpnavy.com/pby/vp14pby_29jun99.jpg

All these markings disappeared when the aircraft were repainted in 1941, and the logical system of squadron assignments disappeared as units were moved around to various wings that same year (for example, BuNo 2291 changed from being 14-P-11 in VP-14 to 22-P-7 in VP-22.

I also have some additional information about the loss of BuNo 2291 at Ambon on 15 January 1942.

The pilot of the aircraft at the time it was shot up was Lieutenant Jack Donohu, USN. The Japanese attackers were the 1st Chūtai (nine-aircraft unit) of the 3rd Kōkūtai (Naval Air Group), which had redeployed from Davao on Mindanao in the Philippines to Manado on the north coast of Celebes (now Sulawesi) on 11 January 1942. The attacking squadron was commanded by Lieutenant T. Kurosawa, who in October 1943 took command of the newly established 381st Kōkūtai. His image, below, is from Hata and Izawa p. 184.

Markings Sources:

Thomas E. Doll, Berkley R. Jackson, and William A. Riley, Navy Air Colors: United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard Camouflage and Markings, Vol. 1 1911-1945, Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal, 1983.

John M. Elliott, The Official Monogram US Navy & Marine Corps Aircraft Color Guide, Vol. 1, 1911-1939, Boylston, MA: Monogram Aviation Publications, 1987.

William T. Larkins, U.S. Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, Concord, CA: Aviation History Publications, 1961. Image of 1134 on page 280.

Fate of BuNo 2291 Sources:

Ikuhiko Hata and Yasuho Izawa, Japanese Naval Aces and Fighter Units in World War II, translated by Don Cyril Gorham, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1989, pp. 124,182

Christopher Shores and Brian Cull with Yasuho Izawa, Bloody Shambles, Volume One, The Drift to War to the Fall of Singapore, London: Grub Street, 1992, p. 218

Tom Womack, The Dutch Naval Air Force against Japan; The Defense of the Netherlands East Indies, 1941–1941, Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 2006, pp. 90-92.
Another excellent resource regarding the adventures and fates of the VP squadrons in the Phillipines during the dark days of the Pacific war is “In the HaNds of Fate” by Dwight Messemer, published by the Naval Institute press.
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  #293  
Old 02-07-2019, 04:56 PM
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Thanks, Wyvern. Definitely looks worth reading. I have not read this book yet, but based on your recommendation, I have ordered it.

Patrol Wing Ten and its squadrons certainly lived through a lot during those months.

Don
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  #294  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:08 PM
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They certainly did. Reading this book, along with “The Fleet the Gods Forgot”, is a real eye-opener into the first months of the war against Japan, and why the Doolittle Raid and Coral Sea were so necessary for American morale.

Wyvern
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  #295  
Old 02-10-2019, 08:27 AM
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Available here:

https://play.google.com/store/books/...d=-V49BAAAQBAJ
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  #296  
Old 03-03-2019, 06:58 AM
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New Model

Nobi's B-52 has absorbed a lot of my modelling time (not a complaint!) so it's been a while since Don and myself have posted anything on here. Anyway let's hope this one makes up for any shortfall. Don will be along soon with his usual comprehensive description of the full size.
Attached Thumbnails
US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9201.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9195.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9196.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9197.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9198.jpg  

US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9199.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-img_9203.jpg  
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  #297  
Old 03-03-2019, 07:01 AM
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Information on Grumman F4F-3 BuNo 1850

This paper model by Garry Gillard is of U.S. Navy Grumman F4F-3 Bureau of Aeronautics Number (BuNo) 1850 as it appeared when assigned to Fighting Squadron 41 (VF-41 – “The Red Rippers”) aboard USS Ranger (CV-4) between December 1940 and April 1941, when it was piloted by Lieutenant Charles "Windy" Shields who (flying a different F4F) was credited with downing four French aircraft during Operation TORCH, the November 1942 invasion of North Africa.

The F4F was the fourth carrier fighter designed by Grumman for the U.S. Navy, following the FF-1 (Grumman Design G-5) of 1933 (see Garry’s model at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/639860-post122.html); the F2F-1 (Grumman Design G-8) of 1935; and the F3F series (F3F-1 [G-11] of 1936 and F3F-2 and F3F-3 [G-19] of 1936 to 1939). The initial proposal, XF4F-1 (G-16) was a biplane that was never built: the contract was cancelled in 1936, and Grumman submitted Design G-18 for the monoplane XF4F-2. Grumman lost the production contract to the Brewster F2A (later named “Buffalo”), but submitted an improved version (G-36) as the XF4F-3, which in its final form was produced as the F4F-3.

Grumman began delivering F4F-3s to the Navy and Marine Corps in August 1940. The first squadrons to receive the new fighters were Fighting Squadron 41 (VF-41) of USS Ranger and VF-71 of USS Wasp. These two carriers had flight decks too short to launch torpedo planes, so their air groups originally included two scout squadrons and no torpedo squadron. In late 1941, one of the scout squadrons in each air group was converted to a fighter squadron. In the case of Ranger’s Air Group 4, VF-4 was renumbered as VF-41 and Scout Squadron VS-4 was renumbered as VF-42 and equipped with fighters.

The Bruno Scissors & Planes model that Garry based his F4F-3 on depicts this aircraft at the Grumman factory in December 1940 as the aircraft was being prepared for delivery. At that time, the Navy had not yet decided which of the Ranger fighter squadrons was to receive the first F4F-3s, so the aircraft was numbered 4 -F-4 with a space after the initial "4" to leave room for a "1" or "2.” See image 1, below. By the time BuNo 1850 was delivered, it had been renumbered 41-F-4.

Garry’s model is in the pre-war natural metal and yellow upper wing surfaces color scheme. The Willow Green tail identifies the aircraft as belonging to Air Group Four (USS Ranger, CV-4). The “41-F-4” fuselage markings and the white cowling and fuselage band identify it as the lead aircraft of Section Two of VF-41. There are also black-outlined white formation chevrons on the wings (these helped the three-aircraft sections maintain formation in the air). The star forward of the cockpit is the Neutrality Patrol marking instituted in September 1939. The VF-41 “Red Rippers” squadron emblem is just under the cockpit. In March and April 1941, VF-41’s aircraft were repainted in overall Neutrality Gray, and in October 1941, all shipboard aircraft were repainted in Blue Gray and Light Gray camouflage.

In January 1942, VF-42 was reassigned to USS Yorktown, which was then deploying to the Pacific, and served with Yorktown through the momentous events of early 1942: the initial carrier raids against Japanese-held islands, the Battle of the Coral Sea, and the Battle of Midway, where Yorktown was sunk.

Ranger and VF-41 served in the Atlantic throughout the war, but BuNo 1850 was converted to long-range photo-reconnaissance configuration (F4F-3P) sometime around May 1942 and assigned to the newly established Marine Observation Squadron 251 (VMO-251). VMO-251 was deployed to the South Pacific, initially at Tontouta, New Caledonia; then to Espiritu Santo from where the squadron participated in the Guadalcanal campaign. BuNo 1850 crashed at sea on 17 November 1942, killing the pilot, Second Lieutenant K.L. Reusser, USMC.

Images:

1. Grumman F4F-3 BuNo 1850 at the Grumman factory in Bethpage, Long Island, New York, in December 1940 as it was being prepared for delivery to the USS Ranger Air Group. At that time, Grumman didn't know whether the aircraft would be delivered to VF-41 or VF-42, so the aircraft is numbered 4 -F-4, with a space after the initial "4" to leave room for a "1" or "2.” By the time 1850 was delivered, it had been renumbered 41-F-4. Source: Larkins, U.S. Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, 284.

2. A painting of Grumman F4F-3 BuNo 1850 during its December 1940 to March 1941 service with Air Group 4 aboard USS Ranger (CV-4). Source: Matthew Laird Acred, Asisbiz, available at https://www.asisbiz.com/il2/Wildcat/VF41/pages/Grumman-F4F-3-Wildcat-VF-41-Black-41F4-BuNo-1850-pilot-Charlie-Shields-CV-4-USS-Ranger-1940-0A.html, used with permission.

3. A Grumman F4F-3P of Marine Observation Squadron 251 (VMO-251) at Espiritu Santo during the Guadalcanal Campaign in 1942. BuNo 1850 would likely have appeared in similar markings at the time it crashed in November 1942. Source: Marine Corps Aviation Reconnaissance Association, Marine Observation Squadron VMO-251) History, available at http://www.mcara.us/VMO-251.html

Sources:

Aerodata International, “Grumman F4F Wildcat,” U.S. Navy Carrier Fighters of World War II, Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1987.

Air Group 4: Casablanca to Tokyo, “Fighting 4 (VF-4),” available at http://www.airgroup4.com/fighting.htm

Joe Baugher, “US Navy and US Marine Corps BuNos, Second Series (0001 to 5029),” available at http://www.joebaugher.com/navy_serials/secondseries1.html

Dana Bell, F4F Wildcat, Aircraft Pictorial #4, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2012.

Douglas E. Campbell, BuNos! Disposition of World War II USN, USMC and USCG Aircraft, Washington, DC: Syneca Research Group, 2012.

Thomas E. Doll, Berkley R. Jackson, and William A. Riley, Navy Air Colors: United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard Camouflage and Markings, Vol. 1 1911-1945, Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal, 1983.

John M. Elliott, The Official Monogram US Navy & Marine Corps Aircraft Color Guide, Vol. 2, 1940-1949, Boylston, MA: Monogram Aviation Publications, 1989.

Peter Freeman, Wings of the Fleet: US Navy & Marine Corps Aviation 1919-1941, On Target Special, Ardington, Oxfordshire, UK: The Aviation Workshop Publications Ltd., 2010, p. 91.

Frank L. Green, The Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat, Profile No. 53, Leatherhead, Surrey, UK: Profile Publications, 1965.

William Green and Gordon Swanborough, “Grumman F4F Wildcat,” U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Fighters, WW2 Aircraft Fact Files, New York: Arco Publishing Company, 1977, pp. 3-45.

Bert Kinzey, F4F Wildcat in Detail, Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, 2000.

William T. Larkins, U.S. Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, Concord, CA: Aviation History Publications, 1961.

Don Linn, F4F Wildcat in Action, Aircraft Number 84, Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1988.
John B. Lundstrom, The First Team: Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway, Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1984.

---, The First Team and the Guadalcanal Campaign: Naval Fighter Combat from August to November 1942, Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1994.

Marine Corps Aviation Reconnaissance Association, Marine Observation Squadron VMO-251 History, available at http://www.mcara.us/VMO-251.html

Mitch Mayborn and others, Grumman Guidebook, American Aircraft Series, Book 4, Dallas, TX: Flying Enterprise Publications, 1976.

Gordon Swanborough and Peter M Bowers, “Grumman F4F Wildcat,” United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1968, pp. 204-209.
Attached Thumbnails
US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-1-grumman-f4f-3-buno1850-4-f-4-dec40_larkins_p284.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-2-grumman-f4f-3-wildcat-buno1850_41-f-4_acred.jpg   US Navy and USMC Between The Wars in 1/100-3-f4f-3p_vmo-251_espiritu_santo_1942_mcara-vmo251.jpg  
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  #298  
Old 03-03-2019, 07:31 AM
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awesome work Garry! awesome research Don!
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  #299  
Old 03-03-2019, 08:46 AM
YOAVHOZMI YOAVHOZMI is offline
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very good work

YOAV
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  #300  
Old 03-03-2019, 11:02 AM
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Don,

There's one thing I've always wondered about the F4F-3 VF-41 pre-war markings. They're the only scheme I've ever seen where the section stripes were on the lower wing surfaces as well as the upper.
Do you (or anyone) have any documentation why the squadron's aircraft were painted with those markings?

Thanx!

Les (The Voices of Authority)
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