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Old 01-16-2021, 08:22 AM
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scon10 scon10 is offline
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Super Constellation tip tank

I was impressed with the method that YankeeKilo had used to make the Armstrong Whitley (see his thread on this forum), so I decided to try his method on what I consider a difficult subject, the tip tank of the Super Constellation 1049 Super G.
Pic 1 shows the real tank and you can see why the shape is so complex, it is a laminar flow shape, with the maximum diameter at around half the length and flowing lines to the nose.


I printed this photo and traced the outline as accurately as possible, resulting in pic 2.
Now, following YK's method, I pasted the silhouette on cardboard, and made a second print cut it in half and use that cross section as the holder for the formers to separate the segments of the tank model. I decided on 6 segments, see the redlines A to E on pic 3. These red lines also serve to measure the diameter of the bulkheads of the segments, which I drew on cardboard and cut out.
Attached Thumbnails
Super Constellation tip tank-0-tip-tank-shape.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-0-side-view-photo.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-1-shape.jpg  
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  #2  
Old 01-16-2021, 09:34 AM
yankeekilo yankeekilo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scon10 View Post
i was impressed with the method that yankeekilo had used to make the armstrong whitley (see his thread on this forum), so i decided to try his method on what i consider a difficult subject, the tip tank of the super constellation 1049 super g.
Pic 1 shows the real tank and you can see why the shape is so complex, it is a laminar flow shape, with the maximum diameter at around half the length and flowing lines to the nose.


I printed this photo and traced the outline as accurately as possible, resulting in pic 2.
Now, following yk's method, i pasted the silhouette on cardboard, and made a second print cut it in half and use that cross section as the holder for the formers to separate the segments of the tank model. I decided on 6 segments, see the redlines a to e on pic 3. These red lines also serve to measure the diameter of the bulkheads of the segments, which i drew on cardboard and cut out.
magnificent!! Ill be following !! Good luck!!
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Old 01-16-2021, 11:12 AM
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Draco Draco is offline
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Yes, this method can be used with a lot of very complex surfaces in a very easy way, if you don't have the time or dedication to learn complex 3d programs.
Just cut the squeleton at the right scale, cover it with "guestimated" paper parts, draw over the part the right dimensions, scan, print the right ones and make the last test to be sure that the result is hight quality and without seams.
Attached Thumbnails
Super Constellation tip tank-stranraer-167-.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-stranraer-36-.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-stranraer-48-.jpg  
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Old 01-16-2021, 01:20 PM
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mbauer mbauer is offline
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Laminar Airfoils

Quote:
Originally Posted by scon10 View Post
Pic 1 shows the real tank and you can see why the shape is so complex, it is a laminar flow shape, with the maximum diameter at around half the length and flowing lines to the nose.


I printed this photo and traced the outline as accurately as possible, resulting in pic 2.
I decided on 6 segments, see the redlines A to E on pic 3. These red lines also serve to measure the diameter of the bulkheads of the segments, which I drew on cardboard and cut out.
Just want to add that the shape of the tank as shown is not laminar, closer to a symmetrical shape of 40%. If the Connie had laminar flow tanks, the angle of the photo is why it doesn't look laminar.

The third photo is much closer to laminar.

Problem with laminar is it needs to be exact to work correctly.

Bug build up on leading edge of wing? Not laminar anymore.

Rivet heads sticking up or slight indentation around them, not laminar anymore.

Attaching a photo of two Laminar plotted airfoils using the green photo #2 you show. Top Airfoil is a symmetrical 15%@ the 40% location.
Super Constellation tip tank-airfoil-not-laminar1.jpg

You can see the 50% plotted one on the bottom of the attached screenshot.

The blue photo #3 is much closer to a laminar 50%. Great Job!

Really love the Connie. Will be watching with interest!

If you're interested I can supply a jpeg screenshot of the laminar for use. Actually thinking of doing some uploading of all the airfoils I've plotted to the download section as jpg or can do pdf as well.

Mike
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Last edited by mbauer; 01-16-2021 at 02:05 PM. Reason: mention upload airfoils
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  #5  
Old 01-16-2021, 03:17 PM
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scon10 scon10 is offline
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Mbauer, you're right, of course. What I meant, is that most external fuel tanks have their max thickness at around a quarter of their length, and are curved over their length. The Super Constellation's are not, that is what makes them special. Very few SC models have this right, in my view.
Just to be clear, I am only trying out YKs method on the tanks, I have build in previous threads some SC models using special techniques, see under statistics on my avatar.
I am now working on the bulkheads, on which I will trace the shape of the segments. I hope it will work all right. Will show you tomorrow.
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Old 01-17-2021, 04:30 AM
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aki aki is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scon10 View Post
I am now working on the bulkheads, on which I will trace the shape of the segments. I hope it will work all right. Will show you tomorrow.
Scon10, I'm looking forward to seeing the next up! Here're just FYI.
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Super Constellation tip tank-wtt-01.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-wtt-02.jpg  
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  #7  
Old 01-17-2021, 07:16 AM
tigertony100 tigertony100 is offline
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Well, if that tank is going to be already built on paper like the one shown in the photo, then it will be an epic construction. We look forward to progress and the final result.Regards, Tony.
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Old 01-17-2021, 01:43 PM
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scon10 scon10 is offline
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Next step is to make the ground plan with the vertical half shape, which I shall call the longeron, and attach the bulkheads to it.
The tank has a circular cross section, so the bulkheads are circles. As you can see, I numbered the bulkheads A to E, see pic 1. The center section is cilindrical, so there are two bulkheads A.
I made slits in the longeron and all the bulkheads and glued them at the appropriate places on the bulkhead, see pic 2.
With little strips of cardboard to position the assembly of longeron and bulkheads on the base, I put the whole together, pic 3.

You will notice, that the base is glued to an oversized base card board. That is because I intend to hold the tracing paper clamped to this base with clothes pins, see pic 4.
YK, how did you did that on the Whitley?

With the tracing paper in place, you can see the edges of the bulkheads and the logeron through the tracing paper, and with a pencil, I carefully followed the outlines and marked them on the tracing paper.

I found out, that you must make sure, that the longeron and bulkheads be truely perpendicular to each other. So let's see what comes out of this action.
Attached Thumbnails
Super Constellation tip tank-2-base-former.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-3-half-tank-bulkheads.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-4-half-tank-bulkheads-front-.jpg   Super Constellation tip tank-5-tracing-paper-one-segment.jpg  
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  #9  
Old 01-17-2021, 02:05 PM
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mbauer mbauer is offline
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Wow, looking good!

See how you've modified the clothes pins, have you taken them apart and reversed any of the springs to change how they clamp? A couple of threads in the tip sections on how to do.

Mike
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  #10  
Old 01-17-2021, 03:12 PM
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scon10 scon10 is offline
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No, I just sawed off the rounded beaks to make the sharp v-shaped beaks. That's all.
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