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  #11  
Old 02-08-2015, 09:22 AM
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TheWebdude TheWebdude is offline
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Many of our forefathers and mothers built models using far more harsh substances than modern hobby enamel and amazingly we are not a planet of mutated aberrations. Some of our parents and grandparents likely made their own cast toys from lead when they were children.

Basically don't cook with it and clean up appropriately when done and you'll be fine.
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  #12  
Old 02-08-2015, 09:38 AM
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airdave airdave is offline
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"I've been doing it for years and it never hurt me."

is the worst advice to pay any attention to.
and the worst advice to offer anyone.

(yes, I've done it too...but its ridiculous)

For example, I have never been pregnant.
And many things are known to been harmful to unborn children.
So, me saying something "it didn't hurt me" is absolutely useless.

Everything has some sort of effect on something
...and all things can hurt someone, somewhere, somehow.

Companies protect themselves by displaying warnings and disclaimers.
But its also the law in some cases when contents are known to have health risks.
And there are legitimate health risks in all things.

I would suggest, as an intelligent being, you pay attention.
Don't blindly use a product without using some common sense and concern.

If, when you open the lid of the paint jar, you notice itchy eyeballs, tingling skin, impaired judgement, the dead rising...
you should put the lid back on the product.

You can also try a simple skin test for allergic reaction.
Put a dab on your forearm and see what happens in a day.
No reaction...no worries.
Get a rash? you might wanna wash it off now.

We've known for decades that solvent based products are dangerous.
You don't want them ingested or in your eyes.
You don't want them in your blood stream.
At least not in significant quantity.
Acrylic paints aren't necessarily any safer. They often use solvents too.
And plastics are extremely toxic to many people.

Biggest rule with any type of paint is ventilation.
Anything airborne is a danger to humans, so combat the danger with adequate ventilation.
That will probably solve all problems that aren't contact related.

Thanks for watching...next week, we eat a Toyota.
[Dave-eye the Science Guy]
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  #13  
Old 02-08-2015, 09:50 AM
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Kevin WS Kevin WS is offline
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Dave - yes, good advice.

My additional rule - if it smells nasty, exercise care!
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  #14  
Old 02-08-2015, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
Thanks for watching...next week, we eat a Toyota.
Mmmm... Foreign food!
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2015, 12:55 PM
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I'm not a doctor, but all I know is I've used Testor's paints since the 1970's, and I'm still alive.
Millions of women (and a few men) use nail polish and they're still alive.
Maybe enamel is a preservative?
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  #16  
Old 12-02-2017, 09:33 PM
Stateria Stateria is offline
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Testors Enamel Paint and lead/toxic?

I just started using this paint. It's getting close to Christmas so I went and I bought a little bottle of it to paint the sides of a mug with. (this was recommended to me by a friend who says they have been doing something like this for years) Well I used the paint on the mug and then had someone tell me that it might not be such a good idea due to the fact that there is a good chance that it may contain lead or is highly toxic. Does anyone know if this contains lead or if I really did mess up by using this type of paint on the mug?
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  #17  
Old 12-04-2017, 05:21 PM
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whulsey whulsey is offline
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If you're in the US, unless its a 30+ year old bottle no lead. Except for some pigments (such as cadmiums) the main toxic materials are the thinners and solvents. Even then if you use care (see Air Dave's comments above) shouldn't be any problem. Being enamels once they're cured shouldn't be a problem even microwaving the cup.
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  #18  
Old 12-04-2017, 05:45 PM
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Airbrushing and spray painting is the biggest cause for concern.
I'm surprised I didn't say more about this (when I commented 2 years ago).

And I think this is what has generated more concern surrounding the use of model paints.

I taught airbrushing for years, and one of the first things I dealt with
was the issues of ventilation, wearing suitable breathing apparatus, and general paint atomization concerns and dangers.

I would say since modelers are really into airbrushing now, you are going to see a lot
more warnings re: paint usage and its dangers.

Anything atomized (sprayed) becomes deadly because inhaling something is far more dangerous than ingesting.
It gets into your blood stream faster, and easier...and it can cause lung damage.

Just filling up your lings with something is bad.
Try breathing in pure water and see what happens.

I primarily used a non-toxic water based Acrylic Airbrush paint for most of my work
and in my instruction/classes...and I always explained that you could drink the paint with no real ill effect...but once you atomize it and breath it in, it can become extremely deadly.

I have a feeling this is where the increased warnings about model paints may come from.
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  #19  
Old 12-04-2017, 06:18 PM
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whulsey whulsey is offline
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Excellent point, Dave. That was the point made in my airbrush class. That acrylics are basically inert, even after they get into the small chambers of the lungs and sit there...filling them up....forever.
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  #20  
Old 12-04-2017, 06:34 PM
will44 will44 is offline
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....was there a MSDS issued for the metal to air density ratio in VN?? Just asking.......
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