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Old 01-09-2019, 10:56 PM
Shawn M Lynch Shawn M Lynch is offline
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Just getting started.

I chose what seems to be a pretty basic kit, a Soviet UT-1 trainer aircraft in 1/33 scale, so I shouldn't be in to far over my head. But I want to ask some questions so hopefully I can avoid the learning curve mistakes and frustrations.


1. What type and gauge of card stock do you print your kits on..?

2. When printing, what size card stock should I use "legal" or "letter"..? When I tried to print my kit, the sides of the print fit fine, however the top and bottom were chopped. I can "fit" to the size of the card stock (8.5 x 11) but I don't want to shrink the scale. I would prefer all the 1/33 scale kits I build all be to scale with each other.

3. What do you use to scratch build clear canopies and how do you form them..?

4. Also, it looks like some builders scratch build their wheels/tires. Any suggestions..?


Thanks again..!
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Old 01-10-2019, 03:35 AM
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Zakopious Zakopious is offline
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Question 2.
The kits are probably in A4 format.
They are too long for letter size but will fit with room to spare on legal size.
You might be able to do a special order and get A4 cardstock, which will fit just right.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_size#A_series
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Old 01-10-2019, 10:22 AM
Shawn M Lynch Shawn M Lynch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakopious View Post
Question 2.
The kits are probably in A4 format.
They are too long for letter size but will fit with room to spare on legal size.
You might be able to do a special order and get A4 cardstock, which will fit just right.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_size#A_series

Thank you sir.


I found some legal sized 65/67/110 on Amazon and ordered 50 sheets of 67 to get started.
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Old 01-10-2019, 03:18 PM
Burning Beard Burning Beard is offline
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Sounds like you have it sorted out. However, you can always copy the individual pages to a graphics program (I use Corel) and cut and paste them to a 8 1/2 x 11 shape. I do this quite often when repainting or rescaling a model.

Mike
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Old 01-10-2019, 03:35 PM
Shawn M Lynch Shawn M Lynch is offline
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Originally Posted by Burning Beard View Post
Sounds like you have it sorted out. However, you can always copy the individual pages to a graphics program (I use Corel) and cut and paste them to a 8 1/2 x 11 shape. I do this quite often when repainting or rescaling a model.

Mike

Firstly, I like the user name, my wife is a big Clutch fan.


Regarding your suggestion, wouldn't that decrease the scale..?
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Old 01-10-2019, 05:50 PM
Burning Beard Burning Beard is offline
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If you know what the scale is you can resize it as needed. Usually with Corel the pdf will import much larger, so I resize it to the original page size 8.5 x 11 or whatever, making sure to increase the pixels to 300 x 300 (the original import is usually pretty large but it is normally at 72 x 72 pixels) this way I am working with the scale the original was in. I then resize it to my desired scale (this is just a percentage larger or smaller done in the resize window). I might say here that Fiddlers Green has a nice little scale converter which uses excel as a base, you just type in the original scale and it will give you the percentage you need to use. Then you see if it will fit a 8.5 x 11, if it doesn't you will need to cut the pieces apart and arrange them to fit on the page. If you are going to a much larger scale you will obviously need to cut at paste some parts to a new page so your finished model may have more pages than the original.

It sounds confusing but it you keep track of what you are doing it is quite easy. I'm a big fan of Corel because it is a vector program. I believe Gimp is vector also and is a free program. These may require a learning curve but it is worth the time spent.


Quite often you can change the scale, by percentage, in the pdf reader before you print. Foxit Reader (free) allows you to do this and has a preview to show how it will fit. It also shows you how your A4 page will look (without changing scale) on a standard letter size page, you just tell it what size paper you are going to print.

Burning Beard is my black powder shooting handle, I earned it on a cold rainy night. Alcohol, and a lodge fire in a Teepee were involved, lol.

Mike
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