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Old 08-21-2019, 03:11 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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1/16 Scale Field Artillery Tractor Part Deux

Patterns printed on regular copy paper and glued to 2 layers of Poster board card.
About 1mm thickness is what is needed.
Except for that bottom panel...its for a different part of the assembly
and needs to be one more layer of postercard (1.5mm).



...
Cut out the holes for dowels first.
I used a regular Hobby Knife for this.
Two sizes of holes...one is 8mm and the other is 6mm (or therabouts).



...
All the parts cut out and ready for assembly.



...
The assembled structure...fairly straightforward.
Note...the top and bottom plates were measured incorrectly.
I had to turn them 90degrees and recut the tabs, so I didn't have to make new parts.
I'll just make the adjustments to the parts on the computer.



...
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Old 08-21-2019, 06:59 PM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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Always fascinating to watch your models take shape.

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Old 08-21-2019, 09:34 PM
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I love watching your designs come together. Even if they are way beyond my skill level.
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Old 08-22-2019, 07:48 AM
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I appreciate the comment Murphy,
but understanding how lazy I am when it comes to building,
explains why I try to find the simplest "beginner's" approach design to every part and assembly .

While these big scale kits (eg Willie, Centurion, Saladin, Gun Tractor) may have a lot of parts to deal with,
the individual assemblies are usually quite simple and basic...
and NOT beyond anyone's skill level.

Having said that, I will admit that this particular model will have a lot of very small parts to cut out and apply.
If you're not handy with the Hobby Knife, you may need some practice.


...
Have you guys figured out what this model is yet?
or is it simply obvious?
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Old 08-22-2019, 09:15 AM
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yukonjohn yukonjohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
Have you guys figured out what this model is yet?
or is it simply obvious?
It's one of those stress relief things - a box with holes through which you pass dowels back and forth while you wait for the next installment of build photos .


Looking forward to watching the design process.


John
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Old 08-22-2019, 10:25 AM
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It's a box.
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Old 08-22-2019, 02:33 PM
missileer missileer is offline
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The markings on each piece lead me to believe that it is a sub-assembly that will not be seen. The holes of different sizes makes me think that a tapered tube (possibly a gun barrel) would pass through it. Therefore, I am guessing that it is a sub-assembly of the towed artillery. In closing, I realize that I am probably completely wrong in my assessment.
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Old 08-22-2019, 07:33 PM
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CharlieC CharlieC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texman View Post
It's a box.

Not bad - so what would a box contain if it were being towed around with a field artillery piece? Kudos if you answered ammunition.


The 25 Pounder was one of the last field guns to carry ready use ammunition in a separate trailer known as a limber. This was a hang over from the olden times where horse drawn artillery pieces had a wheeled box which contained shot and had a seat on top for the gun crew to control the horses.


First image is a WW1 German 7.7cm Feldkanone on the march - the limber is obvious. Second image is a 25 Pounder with limber in a Candian park - I think the limber is reversed probably to stop people tripping over the towing pole.



Regards,


Charlie
Attached Thumbnails
1/16 Scale Field Artillery Tractor Part Deux-ww1_german_feldkanone.jpg   1/16 Scale Field Artillery Tractor Part Deux-25_pounder_with_limber.jpg  
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:30 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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Charlie...that second picture is exactly what I am building! except with different tires.
...



The Limber
a Limber is actually not an "ammunitions carrier".
A "Caisson" is an ammunitions carrier (originally towed behind a Horse Hitch or Wagon).
Limbers were originally the "hitching" point between the Horse Hitch and the towed trailer.
A Limber could tow one or more Caissons which carried the ammunition,
while another team towed the Field Gun using a Horse hitch and Limber.

With the advent of mechanized warfare, Limbers were modified to do double duty, and carry ammunition and supplies.
Although, the connection to older Artillery equipment, as Charlie points out, is obvious.
I'm sure any Limber with space carried supplies long before anyone decided to clarify their uses.

Interestingly, adding a Limber to a towing vehicle has the effect of correcting inline stability of a heavy Trailer...
basically helps to correct uncontrolled steering and fishtailing.
The Limber also reduces the vertical movement of the hitch and tongue at the trailer, keeping it more level during transport.
It can also help absorb and reduce the shock at the hitch from push and pull.

A great example of a Limber's effect can be seen in a Horse drawn Funeral Cart.
In this case the Limber replaces any type of driving cart, to be the hitching point between the Horse team and the Casket trailer.
This "limber" might also be a Caisson, which are often used in funeral processions.
The Limber helps keep the casket Cart more in line with the Horse Hitch, and more importantly, stabilizes the casket to a more level and stable ride.
If the Cart were connected directly to the Horse Hitch, the cart would bounce and jerk and be very unstable.



...
The Field Artillery Tractor towed an 18pounder British Artillery Gun as shown in the photo above
...later, a 25pounder Gun (roughly 3.5" calibre)...with an Ammunitions Limber installed.
Although my Ford FAT is an earlier version, and may have originally towed an 18pdr gun,
most vehicles would have been updated during the War when better equipment became available.
I am fitting my model with a more common 25pdr Howitzer and therefore, a later design of Limber.

The Limber can carry 32 rounds of Ammunition in 16 separate trays in two compartments on either side of the Limber.

I seriously considered whether or not to build a Limber with working doors, interior compartments, and ammunition trays.
But this would seriously complicate the design and make this a more involved component than the Tractor itself!
And then there is still the Field Gun to think about.
Even simplified, the Gun will have a lot more parts and be a lot more complicated to assembly.
I am anticipating a lot of time to get that designed.

So, I decided to go with a simpler approach...the box former interior, and closed rear doors.
But there are plenty of other details to focus on.

...
as was pointed out...those holes will receive dowels.
The central dowel is the long central shaft/tube that passes right through the Limber
and has the hitching points at either end.

I have created a full paper part, with a lead-in section, if you want to roll a paper tube.
Unfortunately it will still require more tubes, or a dowel inside for strength.



So, my suggestion is: cut off the lead-in section...and using a 7.5mm dowel (a standard craft dowel size)
wrap it with the paper part...to create an 8mm tube.





After the paper wrap is secure, burnish the seam to smooth it out.
Then cut off the excess dowel and smooth the ends if necessary.
Caps will be coming later for the ends, so theres no need to colour.

Then you need to make sure the hole in the Former assembly is big enough to receive the part.
I have a number of dowels (different sizes) wrapped with sand paper, to sand and clean up holes like this.

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Old 08-24-2019, 07:16 AM
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Continuing on...

I had forgot to cut out the smaller side holes in the Former assembly...photoshopped into the last photo...
So I used an electric drill to punch them through and then sanded them to the correct size.
These will be for an "axle" dowel...you can see it in the next photo.
It will be some sort of support for the two wheels on the Limber, I'll explain later.

So, now I prepare the "skin" for the Limber.
Going back to my idea of simplifying the assembly, I came up with a one piece cover
ready to receive a lot of surface details and add-ons.

Score, cut and fold...cut out the holes for the dowels...and prepare the four corner joiners.



...
The bottom panel will be an additional part.

The "skin" fits nicely. Even the dowel holes line up!
Its a very snug fit. Nice!

Once the Former assembly is in place, I use a paintbrush to slide some glue into each side panel and lock the skin in place.



...
Bottom panel is prepared the same way and it will attach by way of four edge tabs.
But this is real easy, since only one the tabs (rear) goes under the "skin".
The other tabs are exterior panels that glue flat to the outside of the skin.

The bottom panel is very slightly oversize to allow the tabs to wrap around the Limber box.
Lining it all up is real easy!
Just make sure the "axle" holes are lined up.



...
Once the bottom panel is installed I do some touch-up edge colouring.
Then the completed box is set aside to cure.

The easy part is done!...now its a lot of layered surface details and very small parts.
Its still surprising how many parts are so small at 1/16 scale!




...
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Last edited by airdave; 08-24-2019 at 08:00 AM.
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