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Old 07-25-2019, 04:33 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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Autocar WW1 British Army 30cwt Lorry

I just finished releasing the 1/16 scale Field Artillery Tractor model,
and I plan on producing the Limber (Ammunition) and Gun Trailers for it.
Since I have access to the real things, I will be taking measurements and photos
...but I won't be able to do that for another 2 weeks.


So while I wait for the opportunity to get started on the FAT Limber and Gun Trailers, I want to work on something...
and I thought I would revisit this Autocar Lorry model.

When I designed and built the WW1 Autocar Armoured Car, I followed it up with this
British Army 30cwt Lorry that was originally built on the exact same Autocar Truck chassis.



A fellow in England owns one of these Lorrys...now fully restored...and he provided me
with all the photos I needed of the Chassis during its restoration.
In return, I copied his Truck into a second model using the Autocar chassis.

Anyway, since I had already built the chassis, I didn't need to build another one...
I only needed to test build the upper elements (body, cab, etc) at that time.
That was enough to guaranty it all went together, and to mock up some images of the finished Lorry.



The Body parts have been sitting on the shelf ever since, and I have threatened many times
to build another chassis and finish the Truck.
Now is as good a time as any!

First, print out some parts pages...and spray seal them with Krylon matte clear.
Then score all the fold lines...I am starting with the Frame Rails.
Its important to use a stiff straight-edge for scoring.



I also use that straightedge for cutting out the rails.
I remember how much trouble long straight square tubes can be...
they require careful scoring and cutting, and very careful folding.



These Rails have an overlapping section, so they require creasing and folding...then unfolding for gluing.
I glue the entire length of the Rail, then overlap and fold flat (diamond shape).
Make sure the length of the rail is straight, then un-diamond, and re-diamond the opposing sides.
Do this a few times until the glue has completely grabbed, and you get as straight as possible.



After gluing, I do my best to twist and stretch and keep those tubes as square as possible.
As the glue dries, they will want to do all kinds of things (other than staying straight!)...so you need to keep an eye on them.

After I was sure they were in the best straight shape, I strapped them both together with paper strips.
This way, if one twists, the other will match it.
then put them aside to fully cure.

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Old 07-25-2019, 04:34 PM
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While the Frame Rails are set aside to fully cure (at least 24 hours), I start cutting out the parts
for the various Cross-Members...and I start by cutting out the many inside holes.
There is less chance of tearing, or damaging a part, while it is still in the sheet.



Each Cross-Member has more than one part, so I cut out everything first.
I also edge colour at this time, the individual components.
In this case, I got some new Art Markers...an assortment of greens...with brush tips.
They have nice points to get in tight places, and the brush markers work better than chisels for general edge painting, I think.



Here are the main Frame Cross-Members that will connect the two Main Frame Rails.
Line them up to their marked positions (as per the Frame Rail marks, and the Instruction diagram) and glue in place.

Frame Rails appear to have cured properly, with minimal twisting.
I don't think theres any way to stop the twisting and warping, especially along the length of the Frame (front to rear).
But it won't matter too much once other parts get attached...as long as the frame is flat and not twisted horizontally.



After I got all the Cross-Members installed to the Frame Rails, I set the Frame aside with
some lightweight blocks across the rails, front and rear...to keep everything aligned.
Sorry, no photos of that part.
The goal is to keep the Frame straight and square...no twists or wild warping.

While that is left to be, I started on the smaller Sub-Frame that supports the Engine and Transmission.
Similar construction, two square tube Rails and a couple of Cross-Members.
The Rails are much shorter, so much easier to maintain straightness.
The Cross-Members are a bit more complicated.



It takes patience to assemble the Sub-Frame Cross-Members...there are some fiddly parts.
But it all comes together in the end...and this Sub-Frame will be installed into the Main Frame.

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Old 07-25-2019, 04:34 PM
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Once again, referring to the Instruction diagrams (and the marks on the Frame), install the Sub-Frame to the Main Frame.
I apply a lot of extra glue to make sure its as strong as possible.
Some of the connections are small and narrow, not a lot of contact area between parts.



A couple of Frame details to install...these little brackets are part of the Frame artwork already,
but extra parts are provided, so you can layer to create more 3D effect.



At the rear, I've attached the surface plates to the Frame Rails...and then attached the forward pair of (Rear) Leaf Spring mounts.
Two creased and folded parts, one small rolled tube, and two small discs, make up each Mount.



While the Frame is set aside again, I start on the solid front Axle.
Its only four parts to assemble...but a very tricky assembly.
Its a closed box like assembly...which can be difficult when you get to attaching the final side.
And the top and bottom plates require precise pre-shaping, otherwise its a fight to glue to it all together!



Oh, while the Frame sits to the side, I am still concerned about twisting and warping, so I make sure
it has help to stay in the correct shape. In this case, my Jack Stands come in handy (since the frame can't lay
flat on the table) and I applied some light weight in the center to keep it from curving and twisting.

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Old 07-26-2019, 03:03 AM
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Kevin WS Kevin WS is offline
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Pleased to see Dave that you have unfinished models too lying around!
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Old 07-26-2019, 04:04 AM
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I love the jack stands! I always build little structures to hold models while I work on them, but those jack stands are Next Level.
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Old 07-26-2019, 04:45 AM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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Outstanding tutorial on the construction of this historic, ugly, and lovable vehicle.

Don
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Old 07-26-2019, 05:54 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Very instructional Dave. Great choice to build.
An old Lory like this makes perfect subject matter for paper/card modeling.
Also looking forward to the trailers for the Field Artillery Tractor.
Mike
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:04 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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A little more work last night...

Front Axle all together...this is the fixed axle (no turn).
I have provided an Axle with the King Pin (swivel) section as a separate insert.
If you fit a pin (wooden dowel, toothpick?) you can make steerable wheel hubs.

The Brake Drum parts will glue to the backside of the Wheels.



...
Since it is the fixed Axle, I can go ahead and glue the Brake Drums to the Axle ends.

Until the Springs are assembled, the Axle is set aside.

Note...I just realized I assembled the Axle upside down. You can tell by the side artwork.
The highlighted and shadowed indent are upside down!
Since no-one else will ever see this, so I will proceed...but it was a silly mistake (as a result of rushing).




...
Preparing the Rear Axle parts...
prescoring and getting the Differential housing parts ready for some tricky shaping and gluing.

But first, a central axle tube is required.
There are two tubes to be rolled: the main outer green tube, and a longer plain white inside tube.
The inside tube extends at either end to fit into the rear Wheel brake drums.

Since rolling tubes can be tricky, the inner tube is deliberately sized the same as a common 1/4" wooden craft dowel.
So, instead of rolling that inside tube, I wrapped the green outer layer around a wooden dowel to create the main axle tube.



...
This is the trickiest part of the Differential Housing...
the central strip glues to the top of the Differential Housing
and the sides extend down either side to make the connections to the Axle tube.
The axle tube passes through the Differential Housing first and is centered.
The extended parts are wrapped around the axle tube and glued.
Since the tube is round, the holes need to be pre-shaped round (using a dowel).



...
Add the driveshaft inlet housing...as well as the lower casting vanes...
and the Rear Axle is done...awaiting the Rear Springs.

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Old 07-28-2019, 05:49 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Somewhere along the way (I can't seem to find it now), you described the use of "Krylon" spray to stabilize the printing. What was the full name of that product, and do you spray it on heavily or lightly?
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:48 AM
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airdave airdave is offline
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I use krylon products mostly, but there are other good sealers.
Krylon makes a full line of sealers, fixatives and clear-coats...but they aren't cheap.

Michaels Craft Stores carries the full line (only not all at once lol)
and they regularly distribute 40-50% off coupons in their weekly flyers, on their website and on the back of any receipt.

Any Art supply will carry the full line of Krylon products.

One of their products that I like is their Preserve-It Photo Fixative.
Its a sealer specifically for inkjet photos.

But I am suspicious that many specific products are the same thing,
with different labels/packaging.

I use both of their Low-Odor Clear and Matte Finish, as well as UV resistant Clear.
One has absolutely no smell for indoor use, the others stink like normal but dry in an instant.
Plus they have other Clearcoats, and thick Glazes.

https://www.krylon.com/products/pres...er-protectant/
https://www.krylon.com/products/low-odor-clear-finish/
https://www.krylon.com/products/matte-finish/
https://www.krylon.com/products/uvre...clear-coating/
https://www.krylon.com/products/trip...l-clear-glaze/

Problems with pre-sealing printed pages:
-sometimes leaves a powdery dull surface
-water-based glue won`t stick as well over heavier clearcoat surface
-makes pages curl badly (to combat this, try sealing both sides)

.........................
Home Hardware sells a nice clearcoat (I get it real cheap) that I have used on finished models.
It dries quick, and if you are careful about how quick and how much you spray,
you can put on a light sheen that won't damage the inkjet and protect the surface.
It also deepens and strengthens the colour whichI really like.
I tried it on my Centurion Tank, which was grayed out from age and crappy printing (originally)
and now its dark and green and vibrant.

Once a base coat is established, you can start spraying thicker coats
if you are trying to get a thicker gloss finish.

One of the problems with sealers and clearcoats applied before you build,
is they can affect how well the glue bonds.
The matte finish sprays don't seem to cause too much trouble,
but a proper gloss coat clearcoat will be a problem.
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Autocar WW1 British Army 30cwt Lorry-1730103-0.jpg  
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