PaperModelers.com

Go Back   PaperModelers.com > >

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-19-2018, 08:15 PM
VinceM's Avatar
VinceM VinceM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 568
Total Downloaded: 101.51 MB
Question Testor's Airbrush: Any experience?

I have a high probability of getting a Testor's Amazing Air Airbrush set for Christmas. High probability because my wife is pretty literal: She wants to know exactly what you want, preferrably with model/part numbers and specific colors, and that's what she buys. And I asked for an airbrush. I want to use it for ship hulls and camo patterns.

So: does anyone have experience using one of these on paper models? Almost all of my paint is Testors Enamel, Testors Acrylics, or Apple Barrel Acrylics. I know what comes with the airbrush kit is acrylic, but how well does enamel work in it? And how long does an air can last? Any advice?
__________________
Recent builds: SS Edmund Fitzgerald 1/538, Millenium Falcon
In the shipyard: RMS Queen Mary 2, USS Missouri
Future builds: IJN Akagi, SS United States, HMVS Cerberus, and lots more!
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
  #2  
Old 11-19-2018, 08:24 PM
sgoti's Avatar
sgoti sgoti is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,442
Total Downloaded: 244.53 MB
First thing: Ditch the air can and get an air compressor. Doesn't have to be a dedicated airbrush compressor (although those are small and *quiet*), it can be a larger one for tools.

Growing up, my father was a carpenter, I used his big Craftsman compressor (with appropriate regulator and moisture trap) to run my Badger 200(?).

I have no direct experience with this type of airbrush (external mix), but quite frankly my gut feeling is stay away. This is one step up from a rattle-can (you can change/add paint), but you don't have the control of internal mix airbrushes (especially double-action).

Waiting for airdave's input...
__________________
Glenn
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-19-2018, 08:42 PM
VinceM's Avatar
VinceM VinceM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 568
Total Downloaded: 101.51 MB
I was wondering if an aquarium air pump would put out enough air, what PSI do these things use? I have two air compressors in my garage, but they are both quite noisy.

I'm leaning towards the inexpensive Testors unit because I really don't anticipate using it more than a couple of times a year. And I like that you can screw the bottles directly on it and limit the cleanup. My only experience is with industrial spray guns at work and those are a pain in the butt to clean. I know model airbrushes aren't that complicated, so I'm trying to keep it cheap and simple.
__________________
Recent builds: SS Edmund Fitzgerald 1/538, Millenium Falcon
In the shipyard: RMS Queen Mary 2, USS Missouri
Future builds: IJN Akagi, SS United States, HMVS Cerberus, and lots more!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-19-2018, 10:34 PM
airdave's Avatar
airdave airdave is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 12,749
Total Downloaded: 115.17 MB
No...an aquarium pump will not do.

For external mix airbrushes, the small air cans are quite suitable.
They're cheap, portable, and quiet.
But you can easily go through a lot of them if you get carried away with the airbrushing.

Generally, scale model airbrushing is light work.
You aren't going to spray a lot.
And you aren't going to spray for very long.

Once you get the hang of setting the spray on the airbrush,
its just a quick blast of paint in the right direction or through a stencil or masking.

As Sgoti indicated...double action, internal mix airbrushes are the big step up
and offer more control for artists.
They also require a better compressed air source and a lot more training.

There are much better single action external mix airbrushes.
I don't know how good the Testors model is.
It looks to be a "cheap" tool.
But it was designed to do something...maybe not a lot...but something.
If you don't expect too much, you won't be disappointed.

I have applied paint via airbrush to paper models.
You need to go slow...apply as little paint as possible with each spray or pass of the airbrush.
It is very easy to wet the surface, wet the paper, and ruin your model.
You also want to use lightweight, thin paints and inks that will atomize easily and dry quickly.
If atomized properly, the paint literally dries before it even hits the surface.

You'll find the airbrush handy for adding subtle shading and surface effect.
If your model has been puttied, primered, etc... the airbrush can be used for just about any type of painting on it.
__________________
MY DESIGNS & FREE STUFF: Dave's Card Creations
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-19-2018, 11:28 PM
jaffro's Avatar
jaffro jaffro is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia.
Posts: 939
Total Downloaded: 16.52 MB
I've recently upgraded from painting with spraycans to using an airbrush, I paint all my models.

Definitely ditch the air can idea and go for a small compressor, as Dave mentioned, they're compact, quiet and reasonably cheap. I paid around $50 AU for one that came with a half decent airbrush. Neither have let me down. For the work you want to do, a single action should be fine but dual action gives you more control if you want to do more detailed work.

I did an airbrush course years ago, from memory, they require around 20 to 30 PSI. I could be wrong, it's been a while.

If you want to go cheap, my advice would be not to go too cheap, I'd also reccomend one with a built in gravity feed as opposed to the removeable suction feed bottles.

I recently purchased an ultra cheap one on ebay just to see if it was any good, short answer, it's not.

If you're not going to use it often, they key is to clean it properly before storing it, same as a regular spray gun but on a smaller scale, pull everything apart etc. If you're using water based paints they're super easy to keep clean though and there's no need to dismantle it if you're using it often.

I use Vallejo airbrush paints, with and without primer... as mentioned, if you use a primer first, a paper model can take a fair bit of punishment from water based paints, sometimes I don't use a primer, in which case it's best to use light coats and give them time to dry before applying a second coat. Airbrushes spray a much lighter coat than spraycans and proper spray guns, you can get away with a fair bit before you start to hurt the model as long as you're careful.
__________________
Recently Completed: Modelik Scud

Currently Building: Millennium Falcon, Studio Scale, High Detail
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
  #6  
Old 11-20-2018, 06:19 AM
Ponytail Ponytail is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 508
Total Downloaded: 2.23 GB
Hello Vince,

On YouTube are several reviews on this set. Have you watched them?

It's a very simple airbrush one can can compare with using a spraycan, but with some more control. For bigger areas usable. For the little ones it will need a lot of masking…

But if you have no experience with airbrushing you can give this set a try. To learn how to mix the paint, claning and the basic movements. Maybe you'll go to the better airbrushes, if needed, in a few weeks, but then you know what you want!

Aircans are expensive but handy. You'll find out soon if a compressor is needed.
BTW I used an inflated car-tyre for many years...


Main thin about airbrushing is getting experience! Just do it and do it over and over and you'll get results even with this 'cheap' set!
__________________
Greetings from Holland

Willem E.
(AKA Ponytail)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-20-2018, 07:06 AM
SCEtoAUX's Avatar
SCEtoAUX SCEtoAUX is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,786
Total Downloaded: 399.01 MB
Get one of those 5 gallon portable air tanks, fill it with one of the air compressors in the garage, and use the portable air tank to supply air to the Testors Amazing Airbrush.
__________________
~Doug~
AC020303 EAMUS CATULI! Audere est Facere 19**-20** R.I.P. it up, Tear it up, Have a Ball
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-20-2018, 08:40 AM
airdave's Avatar
airdave airdave is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 12,749
Total Downloaded: 115.17 MB
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCEtoAUX View Post
Get one of those 5 gallon portable air tanks, fill it with one of the air compressors in the garage, and use the portable air tank to supply air to the Testors Amazing Airbrush.
But even with a portable air tank, you'll need a moisture trap and a pressure regulator.
I always used to teach that whatever air supply you used, spend the most of your money on a decent air regulator and moisture trap.
But I was teaching fine artists and custom car painters.

Compressed air can be high in water content...last thing you want to spray at a paper model.

Any pressurized air source delivers high pressure at first (more than you need)
and less as you drain the pressure (less than you need).
A regulator delivers the required pressured constantly and prolongs your air supply.

Those little air cans actually have a small release valve that can work like a regulator
and are small enough to have high initial pressure to maintain a constant rate flow for a longer period of time.
When going to a larger air tank, the pressure rate is much lower and the tank drains a lot quicker.

Definitely do not ditch the air can...use it to practice with the airbrush.
If you have success and want more, you can start to think about other airbrushes, other air supplies, etc.
__________________
MY DESIGNS & FREE STUFF: Dave's Card Creations
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-20-2018, 01:19 PM
ser400 ser400 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Eh!
Posts: 20
Total Downloaded: 112.83 MB
Not knocking Testors, but you will have a very broad spray pattern with that type of airbrush (external mix). It will be good for overall coverage but very limited in any detail painting you may want to do. You mention cammo patterns, not sure you will be able to do these free-hand with this airbrush. If you are in the US and have a Michaels or a Hobby Lobby near to you get one of their 50% off coupons and get an Iwata Neo. (I do not own any Iwata stock!) It's a much better all-round airbrush. Just my opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-20-2018, 05:13 PM
Ares55's Avatar
Ares55 Ares55 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Live in Quito. I am a emigrant
Posts: 68
Total Downloaded: 657.60 MB
Hi. Some time ago, my first airbrush was a Testor. As indicated, it is good to paint with little detail. If you are looking for a lot of detail and control it is not very good. My current airbrush is a Vega double action, excellent equipment. The Testor has some small internal hoses that eventually break and are very difficult to fix. Everything will depend on how much use you are going to give. regards
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 8.70%
Parts of this site powered by vBulletin Mods & Addons from DragonByte Technologies Ltd. (Details)
Copyright © 2007-17, Paper Modelers.com