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Old 03-11-2019, 10:05 PM
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marc pasquin marc pasquin is offline
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question about paper model softwares

I've been using photoshop for my entry into the hobby since its a program I'm familiar with (been using various versions of it ever since the mid 90s).

I've noticed though a few people mentioning graphic softwares that are made specifically for the purpose of model making and have a few questions for those familiar with them:

- are they targeted mainly at people without access to layer-based softwares or do they offer advantages over programs like photoshop or GIMP ? I assume they are simpler to use but I'm wondering if for example they have automated placement of parts to minimise the number of pages to print.

- are projects based on template (building, plane, etc...) or are they more free-form in orientation ?

- How customisable are they ? for example, can you add your own textures and assets ? If it is possible to add textures and assets of your own, what file types are most commonly used ?

- Finally, do the terms of services of these softwares put limits on what you can do with the models you created ? For example, limits on selling or even distributing for free models that were made using any of their textures or assets.

Thanks for any input.
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Old 03-12-2019, 12:45 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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The only program I can think of, created solely for the paper crafting hobby, is Pepakura.
But it isn't a "creation" software...you don't create 3D or papermodels with it.
Its used mainly for unfolding 3D CAD designs into printable paper models.


If you are familiar with photoshop as your "draw" software, then thats what you should use for your "creation" artwork.
You can also use that for fills, colouring, graphics, textures, etc
As well as Instructions diagrams, model sheets, final model packages...

I already worked in Corel (CorelDraw and Corel PhotoPaint), so thats what I use for my creation and design.

There are many who design in 3D and use CAD based programs like Rhino and Sketchup.

Many only use what they can afford.

Many "old timers" design with paper pencil and scratchbuilding...then convert their drawings to artwork or to vector art in a digital program.
Again, using what they are familiar with, or what they can afford.

I use more than one software for different things...I'm sure most designers do.

Yes...some software limits or restricts usage to commercial and non-commercial applications.
But I'm sure we can argue what parts of paper modeling are commercial or not.
Actually selling something for money doesn't necessarily denote whether something is commercial or not.
Because I do produce some intended for retail products, I use a fully licensed version of Corel Graphics.
Because 90% of my work is with Corel, I don't want any issues in that area.

There are other factors to consider.
Much of it is like piracy...you know the answer (whether you admit it or not) and its up to you to choose the right, fair and moral approach.
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Old 03-12-2019, 02:27 PM
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Papierschnitzel Papierschnitzel is offline
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Not sure what you mean with designed for model making.

I use the free open source software Blender
to create the 3D models. If you want to start learning you might want to wait a little as a major update is about to be released which will be much easier or rather intuitive to use. There also is an add-on which will allow you to cut and unfold the model as needed.

Other good 3D software to start would be Sketchup (also has an unfold add-in) and I hear a lot of good things about Tinkercad (although I haven't used that one).

For painting and layout I use Gimp and Illustrator. I think you can also layout with the free open source software Inkscape.

If you know of other software specifically designed for paper model making (other than pepakura) I would be very keen to learn what exists!

Chris
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Old 03-12-2019, 09:53 PM
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rebravo rebravo is offline
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I just tried the sketchup unfold add-in and it worked on basic 3D shapes. I'm currently using sketchup 2015, so i guess the newer versions will have no problem using the add-in. I'll try more complex shapes and see how the add-in performs.


Thank you Papierschnitzel for the tip!
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Old 03-13-2019, 04:20 PM
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marc pasquin marc pasquin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
The only program I can think of, created solely for the paper crafting hobby, is Pepakura.
But it isn't a "creation" software...you don't create 3D or papermodels with it.
Its used mainly for unfolding 3D CAD designs into printable paper models.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papierschnitzel View Post
Not sure what you mean with designed for model making.
Someone on a wargaming forum mentioned he made buildings using Evan Designs Model Builder and I'm sure I remember reading about another one though the name escape me at the moment (and honestly, could have been something like pepakura).

Because Model Builder isn't free and the whole bundle is 155$, I was wondering whether it would be worthwhile for someone like me considering I already have access to fairly good imaging software (bought the adobe CS6 bundle a few years ago) and am comfortable using them.
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Old 03-13-2019, 04:55 PM
bigpetr bigpetr is offline
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If you have Photoshop than you have everything you need for bitmap texturing. From what I can tell from youtube videos of Model Builder it has nothing that Photoshop can not do.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:04 PM
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maurice maurice is offline
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Perhap it all depends on the range of projects that you want to build.

There are two facets to paper model design.
There's the set of flat 2D shapes that will be cut out, folded and/or rolled and then stuck together to form the 3D shape of the model.
Then there's the matter of the graphics to be applied to those shapes to make it look the way you want.
No one whose taken the trouble to look at the images of your Soldier Settlement Cottage (Soldier Settlement Cottage, Australia ) can have
any doubt about your first rate ability to handle the graphics part in Photoshop.

If as I suspect you are primarily wanting buildings, perhaps Sketchup and it's unfolding add on, might be a good (free) way to go.
I looked at it once a while back and it seemed to quite like doing buildings. Learn how to knock off simple structures in 3D in order to derive the
2D shapes you need and you might well be on your way.
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Old 03-14-2019, 05:40 AM
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Thales Thales is offline
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Nice segue for the book I've been writing on paper model design.... (which isn't done yet)

I use a mix of Blender (for CAD work), inkscape (for layout and line markings), Gimp (for image editing that gets fed back into blender as materials, image processing for instructions), pdfmod (for compiling pages of parts into a single file), and Google Docs (for writing instructions).

The real heavy lifting is done by Blender (with the unfolding plugin) and inkscape. Any basic image manipulator or word processor would work fine for the rest of it.

But there are plenty of other workflows that people use to design models. My needs focus around "not expensive" and "runs on linux" as I am creating brand new things from scratch (usually). If you were just doing a recolor of some existing parts you could likely get away with just using gimp/inkscape/photoshop for that. To create brand new non-trivial parts, you really need to use a 3d modelling application and an unfolder of some variety.
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