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Old 08-08-2018, 02:03 PM
MurielS MurielS is offline
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Question Blade Angles -- 30 degrees vs 45 degrees

Hello all,

I recently discovered the NT Cutter line of "art knives" (similar to X-Acto, I guess) and I really like them for the kinds of papercrafts I make.

NT Cutter offers replacement blades of 30 degree and 45 degree angles (see: I'd post links, but apparently not allowed to.)

When is it best to use the 30 degree blade and when to use the 45 degree one? Or alternatively, when/why/where should the 30 degree vs 45 degree blade be used when making papercrafts?
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:53 AM
MurielS MurielS is offline
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LOL. I guess this question either stumped many people or wasn't that interesting to answer?
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Old 08-09-2018, 06:20 AM
cfuruti cfuruti is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurielS View Post
When is it best to use the 30 degree blade and when to use the 45 degree one? Or alternatively, when/why/where should the 30 degree vs 45 degree blade be used when making papercrafts?
I'd guess it depends on personal preference, because the angle at which you comfortably hold the handle depends on the blade's angle.
In my own experience, the 30-degree tip is better for detailed work in tiny parts, tight angles and small arcs; on the other hand, its tip breaks much more easily, therefore I avoid it for thick cardboard formers.
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Old 08-09-2018, 08:48 AM
MurielS MurielS is offline
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Thumbs up

Thanks for the knowledge! This is helpful.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:22 PM
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Lighter Lighter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurielS View Post
LOL. I guess this question either stumped many people or wasn't that interesting to answer?
Or the wrong time of day.

In craft blades - Olfa, Mascot and so forth this is a stiffer blade than the traditional #11. In snap-off blades - Olfa, etc - this is a precision blade.

I use Olfa handles and blades. I keep a 30 degree and a #11 mounted. The 30 to rough in with straight cuts and the #11 for tiny or wavy cuts. The photo below is from a review I did elsewhere. The yellow knife to the left is the 30 degree. Yellow to the right is a #11.

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Last edited by Lighter; 08-09-2018 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:30 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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They make different angles on these blades?

Wouldn't that be for some sort of fixed cutter, like a Mat Cutter?
Where the blade is held in a fixed vertical position?
I can't see it makes much difference with a hand knife tool.

45 degree would be like a chisel.

Unless the angle refers to the shape of the point?
ahh I just got it.
My #11 having a 30 degree point. (long and pointy tip)

yeah, I like the long pointy tip to be more precise.
That stubby 45 degree point is like whats on the snap off cutters.

okay...I get it now. see, ya learn something new every.....never mind

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Last edited by airdave; 08-09-2018 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:18 AM
MurielS MurielS is offline
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I'm finding that it's a little easier for me to use the NT-cutter blades because they are smaller. With the #11 blades (either with the X-Acto or Fiskars handle) I find that the blades sometimes bend too much when used with cardstock and it can make cutting straight lines without a ruler rather difficult.

Thanks for all this info and commenting! Very helpful!
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdave View Post
My #11 having a 30 degree point. (long and pointy tip)
A #11 blade is about 22 degrees.

The NT Cutter blades and knives are 30 and 45 degrees. And much smaller than the blades most of us seem to use. Back in the olden days we would call these "stencil" knives.

I'd forgotten all about them. I've now got one in my Amazon cart. You can never have too many knives!
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:51 AM
MurielS MurielS is offline
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I also love the NT Cutter's swivel knife.

I do have a stencil knife from X-Acto but was never able to successfully use it. Somehow, I always end up just scoring the paper and not cutting through unless I made another pass. I am using cardstock most of the time although having read a blog post from another papercraft maker, I think I'll have my stuff printed on paper that's heavier than regular copy paper but lighter than cardstock for most stuff.
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Old 08-10-2018, 03:35 PM
cfuruti cfuruti is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurielS View Post
...I always end up just scoring the paper and not cutting through unless I made another pass...
Scoring with blades and multi-pass cutting are no sins. In fact, multi-pass is often essential.
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