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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-02-2012, 06:52 PM
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For what it's worth, SAM Publications "The Messerschmitt Bf 109 Part 1" shows two photos of Galland in an Emil. From the photos the following can be confirmed: (1) the "S" badge was as shown on the model. (2) The "Mickey Mouse" marking, not the red griffin, was used. (3) the JG commander's chevron is displayed. (4) the nose is yellow as on the model. (5) The camouflage is of the style shown on the model. The tail assembly does not show in the photos nor do the wingtips. The photos are from the BoB in the Aug-Sep 1940 timeframe.

Lovely build, Gerard. Perhaps Dragos will redo some of his Marek Bf 109 repaints using the new (2012) version in 1:33 by Marek.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:08 PM
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It IS a lovely build! Some of us get all excited by the minutiae, and then we--irritate the rest of you perfectly normal lot. Sorry.

Yes. Y, the "S" is the overall insignia for Jg26, and the griffon--more specifically "Hollenhund"--is the 9. Staffel emblem, so it wouldn't be on Galland's aircraft.
The reason I originally questioned this aircraft is, those tailboom markings are necessarily real exclusive--they're how other pilots identify you in action, and in a battle you need to know who's who so you know where to go & what to do. Your group commander, the squadron commander--different guys will form up for each in different ways. So the ID markings don't shift around.

Colors, though, sometimes shift around.
Like nose colors, in this period and before--there was a period when RLM thought it'd be a good idea to keep the enemy on their toes by changing the color codes of the invading aircraft. So, almost weekly, the command would come down for a particular unit to have white noses, then yellow, or blue or--and finally, the ground crews just staged a massive sit-down strike. Stopped that, cold, pretty much around this late-'40 time frame.
There're subtleties in these paint jobs that real geeks need to know about.

(--And I just erased about forty lines of those subtleties, realizing just in time that maybe YOU lot don't want to be that kind of geek! Ask me, if you like, but I won't presume...)

Bottom line, there's a lot of fun stuff to go search out if you get interested in the RLM paint jobs--not just the what, but the how and why are fascinating.
and then there's just making the darned card model, which is not one whit less noble a pursuit. What a great hobby.

'Duster
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Old 03-03-2012, 12:32 PM
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I have wanted to build a model of a Galland flown aircraft for a long time. I had the pleasure of meeting him in 1977 in Berlin. It was a brief encounter, and I wish I had more time to talk to him, but it was still a thrill for me.
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Old 03-03-2012, 12:55 PM
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Yah, my drafting partner met Galland too--(& BTW if anybody wants a good 109 rubber-powerflyer, PM me! The Wilcke story I told had a modern connection too--Doug Wilkey, stick & tissue flyer, poet, shooter, gourmand, Legionnaire and all around modern Scarlet Pimpernel, was a distant cousin; we drew Wilcke's airplane for him.)

Hm. Maybe we should talk--there are a couple of good candidates for someone up for a Galland repainting job. There's also a book, Michael Ullman's Luftwaffe Colors 1935-1945 (Hikoki, 2002), that would be handy: Ullman collects and parses the original RLM designations for the schemes and paint specs so that the camo pattern could be laid out from prime source. It's out of print, but if it helps I think I can supply the needed data for this aircraft. Contact me at hudsonduster@hotmail.com

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Old 03-04-2012, 01:20 AM
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Thank you all for your kind words!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by birder View Post
Looks good Gerardo, which is your favorite Me 109 you've built would you say?
Well, that's hard... not easy at all. I guess I liked them all... they have this magic knowing that many were outstanding pilots in a country where politics was wrongly gone. I really enjoy building them all. Just as the same as the Mustangs. I just wish to see one of these 109's live, like the Mustangs in the Air Shows (and a FW-190 that I learned is stored in a museum in San Antonio... my next stop).

Duster, all your comments are so very welcome. As you say, this little hobby of ours expands with the knowledge we gain from books and people like you. Thank you!

And regarding what you said about whose plane was this particular one, I also found a very close similarities with Gerhardt Schöpfel (an easy name to remember, as is my namesake) but Gerhardt's wasn't yellow nose... or at least that's what I found on Histoire & Collections book "Messerschmitt Me109 Volume I From 1936 to 1942", and which shows in page 61 Schöpfel's plane, all the same as this model, but without the yellow nose. So, I went on, and found that is 90% similar ot the one shown in this web site:

Adlerhorst-Hangar

Oh, and instead of the swastika, it shows the gray diamond Duster mentioned.



Oh, and Halinski has the Adolf Galland 109 in their 1999 edition (1/99), Messerschmitt Bf-109E-4 / N, machine W.Nr. 5819, flown by Adolf Galland, commander of JG-26, August 1940.



But regardless, I really liked this model.
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2012, 01:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashrunner View Post
I have wanted to build a model of a Galland flown aircraft for a long time. I had the pleasure of meeting him in 1977 in Berlin. It was a brief encounter, and I wish I had more time to talk to him, but it was still a thrill for me.
Gee... you were lucky by meeting him, my friend!!
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2012, 08:54 AM
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Yup, both can depict Schöpfel's (I can't make an umlaut on my Yankee keyboard!!) plane, yellow nose or no. Those bright marks became necessary for tactical identification--camo isn't as important when you're airborne in hostile territory, you want to have quick IFF recognition. See my long harangue about nose paint above, and recall that the BoB air support all were painted with tactical blazes.

The two-volume H&C set on Bf109s (not "ME!" grrrr...) borrows heavily on others' work, but is pretty nicely presented as a detailed overview of the aircraft; vol. I's got a great breakdown of codes and markings that you don't see every day.
But, if you're real dedicated about geeky minutiae, you want to cross-confirm what you find in books (particularly when published in different countries, with different copyright sensibilities).
And you want to be very suspicious about anything you turn up on the 'Net, for the same reason. There're a couple of Russian and East European sites that are great quick first references, but the data is often in error, sometimes from gaps in language and understanding and sometimes from that copyright issue.

I can only document the deliberate blanking-out of the swastika in III. JG 53 during the period cited; this black diamond is more likely a product of our modern sensitivity.

Hey, I'm hijacking Gerardo's nice thread here and I should apologize. We can take it to its own topic if anybody wants.

I'm very glad to see Galland's BoB ride in a Halinski kit.

'Duster
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2012, 09:33 AM
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I have alluded elsewhere on this forum to having a relative who had served in the Luftwaffe during WW2. It was very politely hinted that I might find it appropriate to name him. I have taken many days to think on this. It is a topic about which I have understandable and forgivable sensitivities.
However: I'm also not ashamed of my relative's record and skills.

General Adolf Galland is a 4th or 5th cousin of mine on my mother's side of the family.
I found that out by accident one day, when I was dragged along to visit a then very elderly relative, my mother's aunty. I was 8 or 9 years old at the time. It turns out that this relative's Maiden Name was Galland, and she was a cousin of General Galland.

Over the decades since, I have kept quiet about the connection, mainly because there are those in my country who lack the tolerance that exists elsewhere.

This thread, in it's discussion of General Galland has finally prompted me to "speak up" as it were, being that others here have an equally weighty connection with him.

Kind and Respectful Regards my friends, Uyraell.
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Old 03-04-2012, 10:11 AM
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My friend & colleague Rocky Russo liked to say, "Machines are the ultimate innocents: they aren't aware of the use they're intended for." He said this a lot in response to comments about displaying German aircraft, in the circles we flew in.

It applies, to varying extents, to the men and woman who participate in these conflicts.

Humans sometimes have no choice in their course; some may choose based on belief or impulse or circumstance. Sometimes they may come to question or regret those choices. Sometimes the choice is judged by history, often judged mainly by the prevailing side of the issue.

I celebrate the human courage and spirit of those who go to war, regardless of whatever values we may place on cause and effect. Horrific things have happened and will continue to do so, but each life occurs on a level apart from our perceptions of the events: a birth is the moment of supreme hope and each death is that hope's inevitable end. We celebrate those lives.
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Old 03-04-2012, 10:54 AM
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Very well said and most aptly expressed, Hudsonduster.
My Thanks to you.

Kind and Respectful Regards, Uyraell.
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