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Old 02-11-2013, 12:32 AM
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mbauer mbauer is offline
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1st Person Gets Free Model of This Rocket

First Person to Correctly answer all of the questions about this rocket series wins a free PDF of it!
1st Person Gets Free Model of This Rocket-pict-1.jpg

1) Name?
2) Design Speed? Mach=
3) Design Altitude? Miles=
4) Rocket #B-3 was the first to do what?
5) Rocket #B-5 was the first to do what? (Hint: date was February 24, 1949)
6) Rocket #B-8 was the first to do what? (Hint: date was July 23, 1950)
7) Rocket #B-7 was the first to do what? (hint: date was July 29, 1950)

PDF is 1/32 scale stomp rocket version. Don't have any instructions yet, but this only took 2-hours to make this alpha build.

Very interesting rocket, lots of "firsts" to do things....

Last hint: Yes, it has a V2 on the bottom!

Post answers as a reply to this thread.

Mike
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:10 AM
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Bumps
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:15 AM
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1) Name?Bumper
2) Design Speed? Mach=4.29585
3) Design Altitude? Miles=244
4) Rocket #B-3 was the first to do what? The second stage used a liquid propellant with a 32 second burn.
5) Rocket #B-5 was the first to do what? (Hint: date was February 24, 1949)
It attained a speed of 5,150 miles per hour and an altitude of approximately 250 miles making it the greatest velocity and the highest altitude ever reached by a man-made object.
6) Rocket #B-8 was the first to do what? (Hint: date was July 23, 1950)
First Launch From Cape Canaveral.
7) Rocket #B-7 was the first to do what? (hint: date was July 29, 1950)
Bumper 7 attained a speed of Mach 9, the highest sustained speed that had ever been reached in the Earth's atmosphere.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:10 AM
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1) Name? General Electric RTV-G-4/RV-A-4 Bumper
2) Design Speed? 5260 km/h (3270 mph)
3) Design Altitude? 393 km (244 miles)
4) Rocket #B-3 was the first to do what? Reached a maximum altitude of 150.3 km (93.4 miles) even though the WAC stage failed.
5) Rocket #B-5 was the first to do what? Correct separation of stages at 32.2 km (20.0 mi) - the upper stage then reached an altitude of 393 km (244 miles) - then a a new record for any man-made object.
6) Rocket #B-8 was the first to do what? First Rocket Launch ever from Cape Canaveral. First launch of a RTV-G-4.
7) Rocket #B-7 was the first to do what? Upper stage ignited properly - achieved a speed of 5260 km/h (3270 mph) - again a record.

-------------------------------------------------------

The difference is in Number 4!
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:43 AM
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Incidentally - I just did this for fun, not for the PDF!

Inky, is more deserving - he even has the appropriate Avatar!
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:02 AM
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Most definitely it's Inky, I should have pointed out that I was just stiring for fun not for love of rockets.
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:23 PM
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Ah Looker - did not notice you posted a link until now!

So Mike, which are the correct answers you had in mind?
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:59 PM
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Well, INKY got all of them, looker was close, except for the question on the B-8.

Inky got them all! The question on the B-3 he mentioned 2nd stage was liquid. Although it exploded when ignited, it was the very first multistage liquid rocket.

I'll PM to get his email to send the PDF set to.

Very interesting rocket for a 1940's design. Set several records, always wondered what the first launch from Cape Canaveral was, reading the ROTW book asnwered the question for me.

Thought this would be fun to see how many knew...

Thanks for the link looker, and for your post as well Kevin!

Mike
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Last edited by mbauer; 02-11-2013 at 04:25 PM.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin WS View Post

Inky, is more deserving - he even has the appropriate Avatar!
I spent allot of time out at White Sands launching rockets, had seen pics of the Bumper and knew right off what it was but never knew it's history, I learned allot from this.
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Old 02-12-2013, 12:27 AM
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Interesting history relating to the V-2 and early rocketry.

Amazing in the early days how people did not make an issue over everything disintegrating, blowing up, falling apart etc. Given the state of technology, in itself the issues were not surprising, but the acceptance of it all is.

Perhaps the lack of an intrusive sensationalist Press had much to do with this!

And when the technology was ironed out - it then worked so well.

In the 1979 De Havilland Vampires (a plane that first flew in 1943 and went into service in the late 1940's) were still in active service and I had many opportunities to examine these.

For a jet they were really basic - the body was made of plywood, with some aluminium around the engine bay! Still also had valves in part of the plane, as well as some weird wiring using massive gauge wire. But they zoomed around and were used for ground strikes.

I also remember the first landing on the moon. Think of the basic technology then. Terrifying, but it all worked!
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