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  #11  
Old 07-04-2011, 11:07 AM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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Ruben-- Amazing work so far. Those little joining strips are incredible!

You mustn't worry too much about gaps. The map is not so accurate that seams could join perfectly everywhere. Also, where mountain ridges are (such as the Andes, near you?), you'll be accessing this "white space" to fashion your joint, exaggerating the surface topography to mold peaks and ridges.

As for cutting the map into two or three pieces -- good luck. Never tried it myself. Sounds like it might be a useful trick. And it will give you better access to the developing globe's underside. I found this inside-out view to be enlightening, and might prove useful in designing the various joints and seams.

As for additional joining strips, do indeed think (note the "k", not a "g" in think; you are using "thing" when you obviously mean "think") carefully about where you want them. There are several places (not sure where at the moment) where these would be appropriate -- places that are "colder" than others.

"Dovetail joints" is a very nice term as well. The mid-ocean ridge, the only one wherein I designed the joinery system (the orange flaps), is intended to assemble this way. A bit like interweaving your fingers together. Note that the mid-ocean ridge is the earth's loosest seam.

As for Zathros's comment, the most stable plate, relative to the others, is Africa. But I've never envisioned the assembled map as being able to portray great relative movement of plates, that is, one sliding over another as you often see in those animations of how the continents used to be connected, and where they will be in several hundred million years into the future. This is NOT that globe!
Indeed, I'm an adherent of geomorphologist Paul Lowman's fixed continent theory, wherein the continents are pretty much where they've always been. The "pretty much" qualifier is significant, in that it allows for small-scale shifting and reshaping, but rules out the huge transformations usually depicted when the continents are imagined as thin rafts loosely connected to the mantle. Paul points out that recent results of seismic tomography show that continents are much thicker than we once imagined, with roots extending down on the order of several hundred miles, or almost the thickness of the mantle itself.
Note to Ruben -- this gives you lots of room there on the continental undersides to fashion some intricate paper engineering normal (90 degrees, the up-and-down direction) to the surface. Save the "white" parts of the map!
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  #12  
Old 07-05-2011, 08:42 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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If I’m allowed to make an analogy:

Trying to assemble this model may be like putting together pieces of a broken egg shell that should have some kind of movement.

If they are not supported from behind in some way, this can be a very difficult task.

Two solutions come to my after reading the comments by Zathros and Chuck: 1) the use of different kinds of paper (different thickness) to make some inner “flexible” joints (I was thinking on “V” struts); or 2) the use of some sort of nucleus to which the continents are “fixed” from the underside, allowing their borders to have some freedom of movement.

Earth Tectonics-et12.jpg

It would make it a lot easier to activate the movement of most of the plates (or at least their borders), although the additional work is also bigger.

As soon as I have some time I’ll continue with it
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  #13  
Old 07-06-2011, 07:34 AM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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Inventive thinking, Ruben.
The nucleus idea strikes me as possibly more troublesome, because of supporting the nucleus' weight, than flexible struts.

Here is another image that might prove helpful:

(First time I've tried to post an image on this board so not sure it's on here or not. doesn't show up in preview.
Okay, it shows up as a downloadable image, but not as an image on the screen. Perhaps an administrator can clue me in?)

I'll also post this over at my website. (Later) Nah. Didn't work over there, either. http://rightbasicbuilding.com/page-t...d-maybe/234-2/ Same problem,
Maybe because it's a .pdf and not a .jpg?
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Tectonic Globe Cross-section Post.pdf (35.1 KB, 8 views)

Last edited by rightbasicbuilding; 07-06-2011 at 08:19 AM. Reason: Image doesn't show in post
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  #14  
Old 07-06-2011, 09:46 AM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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postable image?

Let's try this .jpg:
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Earth Tectonics-tectonic-globe-cross-section.jpg  
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  #15  
Old 07-06-2011, 02:00 PM
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Retired_for_now Retired_for_now is offline
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Images

Quote:
Originally Posted by rightbasicbuilding View Post
First time I've tried to post an image on this board so not sure it's on here or not. doesn't show up in preview.
Maybe because it's a .pdf and not a .jpg?
Got it in one ... common image files (jpeg/gif/??) show as thumbnails in the post while pdf files show up as the little icon that you have to click to see. The embedded pdf only works with very small files, however. The image upload window lists the file size limits for the various types down at the bottom.

Amazing stuff ...

Yogi
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  #16  
Old 07-07-2011, 08:41 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Thank you Chuck!

The cross-section helps a lot. With it it is a lot easier to understand how the seams are assembled. Work will be incredibly easier now Very useful guide indeed. Looks like I’ll have some fun! Not being ironic, I really enjoy this kind of challenges that demand creativity and require more than just cut&glue. The “pin joints” is something I could have never guessed.

As for the nucleus, I was thinking on a paper sphere, or even better: a paper icosahedron. It would give strength and stability to the interior while keeping it lightweight.

As soon as i figure how to handle this i will continue posting photos
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  #17  
Old 07-08-2011, 09:04 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Since there are no instructions or a specific way to build this model I decided to finally take some risks.

First, I cut the model into several smaller parts. This way I will handle it better.

Earth Tectonics-img_7013.jpg

Then, I cut the yellow, black and purple tabs but not in exactly the same way they are drawn. In the model they are triangular. I cut them as long tabs.

I have no particular reason to choose that, and I don’t really know beforehand if it is a good choice. But again, since nothing is written on stone, possibilities can be explored. If they prove useful they will be kept. If not, they will be discarded and another option tested. Basic scientific method applied to paper modeling

Purple and yellow tabs are not folded. But black tabs are folded backwards. This to make it look more like what the cross-section suggests.

Earth Tectonics-img_7014.jpg Earth Tectonics-img_7015.jpg

As for the ridges that present a side movement relative to each other, I thought that a special joint should be used to allow for a small movement. Straight small tabs like the ones I first used in the Pacific do not work, because they fix two adjacent parts. So a small hinge is needed.

I came with this simple design that, if made at the proper size (small) and with the proper paper (75 gsm copy paper) should work as a kind of hinge, where the two ridges are supported by the rectangular areas, while the triangular supports that meet in the bottom serve as pivots. The small section where the two triangles meet must be small enough as to allow some flexibility, but not as small as to be easily tore by continuous use.

I think 4mm long by 4 mm tall with a 1.5 or 2mm hinge (where the triangles meet) should work.

Earth Tectonics-joints.jpg

This is purely experimental. I have never tried anything like this before in any paper model. It works in my head, but I have not tested it yet in real life. I will have some of this “side hinges” printed this afternoon at different sizes to see what their limits are. If copy paper is too thin probably light cardstock will do the trick.

Interesting challenge indeed
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  #18  
Old 07-18-2011, 09:46 AM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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Ruben,
Sounds like you've got the right approach to putting this together.
You probably already understand why I, after putting the first one together (actually about halfway through the process), realized that a second attempt would be necessary to refine the seams both conceptually and in their as-drawn details. As I worked along I found myself wishing I'd been more farsighted and kept another, uncut map copy to mark up with as-cut seam designs and fine tunings (some shaving here and there of tabs could have been kept track of). Sorry not to have given you this tip earlier. Recommend highly you implement this.

As for your special, small-movement hinge, it seems to me that it will not give pure side-to-side motion but rather impart a not unpleasant or inappropriate rocking, the hinge's extremities rising or falling, much like the playground toy we in the USA call a see-saw or teeter-totter. This might be especially effective seams which follow rivers -- the Amazon and the Irrawaddy (between Bangladesh and Burma) -- and the ocean fracture transecting Cuba. Also the Sahara-Niger seam. Indeed, maybe most all inter-continental seams lacking in volcanoes (the red dots) or black triangles.
Keep an open mind to the possibility that not all of these Special Joints be small. One or two rather larger constructions might serve well for the Amazon and Sahara creases, if the bend in the hinge can be kept from opening too wide.

This special joint design might be effective, too, if you invert it, so that the hinge point sticks UP, as if a little mountain. Perhaps along the Andes and Rockies? The Himalayas?

And now I'm imagining a cousin to this basically v-shaped joint -- a joint in a zee configuration, so that it goes both up AND down. This might be effective where ocean-plate subduction and upthrust mountains occur -- certainly NOT along the Pacific coast of South America, where both sides of the seam must go inward, but possibly the outer (most eastward) arc of the Caribbean, and in Iran.
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  #19  
Old 07-18-2011, 04:01 PM
billyank1864 billyank1864 is offline
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I teach earth science...these could come in handy
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  #20  
Old 07-18-2011, 05:11 PM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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Billyank -- keep us posted on what you do.
I'm guessing you found the link over to my website and more of these foldable maps?
Lots of asteroid maps, but also quite a few of Earth.
Chuck
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