PaperModelers.com

Go Back   PaperModelers.com > > >

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 06-02-2017, 01:25 AM
Paper Kosmonaut's Avatar
Paper Kosmonaut Paper Kosmonaut is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Grunn, NL
Posts: 2,595
Total Downloaded: 244.54 MB
The only thing I know they say about laser printed paper model sheets is that the toner is a layer on top of the paper surface. When bent into shape, it might chip or flake after a while due to surface tensions. Inkjet ink is kind of absorbed into the paper and just discolours after a while. No better options there, I think, although a layer of UV-spray might help with that.
Perhaps you also can spray laser printed stuff with a flexible layer to prevent chips falling off.

The wooden sticks for struts are a perfect solution, I would say. No one says you cannot use other stuff in paper models.

Tiny tubes like the F-1 plumbing is easy to roll around the thinnest metal knitting needles and even brass rods or sewing pins. I used thin paper and rolled parts longer than necessary, cutting them to length while on the rod. "elbows" in the piping were cut from the length in an angle. Rolling them around the same rod also guaranteed the same size. I deviated from the model kit and just looked a photos of the engines for reference when I made the F-1 plumbing. Edge glued the pipes together. The curvatures were a little angular here and there but that is what you get with paper.
(The thinnest pipelines over the engine bell were just metal wires in my model, I must admit.) Link to my F1 build thread
__________________
PK's Blog - Dij t dut mout t waiten!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-02-2017, 07:06 AM
sreinmann sreinmann is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Columbia, MD
Posts: 187
Total Downloaded: 157.24 MB
Hope I catch you before your trip to the store. Try to look for lolly-pop sticks, which in my store is found in the bakery section. These are solid-rolled paper cylinders about .35cm to .4cm in diameter. I've been slicing them lengthwise and unrolling to get smaller diameters. They are also handy to shave with the knife and sanded to a point for struts and such. Just a suggestion.
Attached Thumbnails
Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3645.jpg   Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3644.jpg  
__________________
Happy Crafting - Scot
On the Bench: Voyager 1:25
Under Design: Chandra 1:48
On the Back Burner: Hubble 1:48
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-02-2017, 11:37 AM
SAustin16's Avatar
SAustin16 SAustin16 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 357
Total Downloaded: 36.67 MB
Excellent build Mechanic.

Great suggestion SReinman...those lollipop sticks look superb.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-02-2017, 02:24 PM
spacecraftcreator spacecraftcreator is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 114
Total Downloaded: 4.17 GB
Same from me here on the build job as it looks great...I as well will be looking for those sticks at my grocers.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-02-2017, 11:06 PM
Mechanic's Avatar
Mechanic Mechanic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Midvale, Utah
Posts: 375
Total Downloaded: 75.68 MB
Quote:
Originally Posted by sreinmann View Post
Hope I catch you before your trip to the store. Try to look for lolly-pop sticks, which in my store is found in the bakery section. These are solid-rolled paper cylinders about .35cm to .4cm in diameter. I've been slicing them lengthwise and unrolling to get smaller diameters. They are also handy to shave with the knife and sanded to a point for struts and such. Just a suggestion.
And an excellent one. I have used q-tips the same way but for this project they weren't long enough. I suspect the lolly pop sticks would fit the bill, I'll definitely look for some.

Thanks for the comments, no pic tonight but I did get two of the inner shrouds glued on, giving the ship a diameter over 12". It is starting to get bulky and with the fins on it should have a width of about 18". I' m itchin' to get the engines on but Im following the instruction steps.
__________________
I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves. Carl Sagan
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
  #16  
Old 06-04-2017, 01:13 PM
Mechanic's Avatar
Mechanic Mechanic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Midvale, Utah
Posts: 375
Total Downloaded: 75.68 MB
Inner skins of the engine shrouds. It's really starting to hit me just how big this thing is. I've had to find a space to put while I'm not working on it.
Attached Thumbnails
Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3337.jpg  
__________________
I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves. Carl Sagan
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-18-2017, 10:46 AM
Mechanic's Avatar
Mechanic Mechanic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Midvale, Utah
Posts: 375
Total Downloaded: 75.68 MB
Thrust Structure complete and on to finish the 1st stage. And, a pic of my build-buddy keeping my toes warm.
Attached Thumbnails
Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3343.jpg   Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3344.jpg  
__________________
I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves. Carl Sagan
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-02-2017, 03:26 PM
Mechanic's Avatar
Mechanic Mechanic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Midvale, Utah
Posts: 375
Total Downloaded: 75.68 MB
First stage completed, warts and all. I had a little learning curve attaching the first ring to the thrust structure, but the rest of the rings went without issue until the last ring. It was a smidge larger than the rest of the rings for some reason. I suspect the construction style had a bit to do with it, the lower rings have a sort of 'picture frame' assembly and the last ring is straight double layers (at the time of mounting). That, and the last ring hadn't fully dried. Warping and shrinking from glue has been a significant aspect of the build.

I thought it would be neat to compare it to the old Alan Rose Saturn. I didn't realize just how much yellowing had occurred over the years. . .
Attached Thumbnails
Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3353.jpg   Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3354.jpg   Greelt's (& company) Saturn V-img_3351.jpg  
__________________
I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves. Carl Sagan
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-04-2017, 07:30 AM
SAustin16's Avatar
SAustin16 SAustin16 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 357
Total Downloaded: 36.67 MB
That is some serious hardware...you are doing a great job.

It still amazes me that the S-1C propels that entire stack to 5000 mph and 38 miles high in 150 seconds. I'm old enough to remember seeing brand new Saturn V's gleaming in the Florida sun ready for launch. That was a truly inspiring time to be a kid.

Keep up the outstanding work.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-04-2017, 12:11 PM
Mechanic's Avatar
Mechanic Mechanic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Midvale, Utah
Posts: 375
Total Downloaded: 75.68 MB
The good news so far is the interstage ring has a good fit to the first stage. The not so good is as I've been working on the support ribs inside the instructions don't match the parts, I did a little research and found Greelt's original release has been changed, with many parts not on the sheets and the remaining parts modified. It looks as though half the "T" style joints have been eliminated and changed to "+" joints. Does anyone know the proper sequence and arrangement?

The more I think about it, I -think- I've almost worked it out but I'm not all the way there. For the time being I'll just work on the ullage rocket fairings.
__________________
I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves. Carl Sagan
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 8.33%
Parts of this site powered by vBulletin Mods & Addons from DragonByte Technologies Ltd. (Details)
Copyright © 2007-17, Paper Modelers.com