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  #31  
Old 01-30-2018, 07:36 PM
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beckychestney beckychestney is offline
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Originally Posted by luke strawwalker View Post
The engineers from Morton Thiokol who designed and built the boosters, recommended scrubbing the launch due to low temperatures, citing the demonstrated fact that the previous coldest launch of the shuttle boosters at a temperature of 53 degrees showed severe O-ring erosion, and they were overruled... more than that, the very NASA managers they were making their recommendation to did their best to denigrate and intimidate them, saying, "My God, Thiokol! When are we supposed to launch? Next June?"
Later! OL J R
Yes, that's Roger Boisjoly's testimony
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  #32  
Old 01-30-2018, 08:18 PM
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Awesome pics Dave! I especially love the pics of the TV screen! They remind me of the days when I would record the audio only of Star Trek in the 80's. Your pics sure beat the few crappy 110 and 126 prints I have left:







This one below is the ONLY photo I have that was taken at the Lewis Visitor's Center:



It showed a concept tilt rotor landing at a small airport. Unfortunately what's not in the photo were the small white cone shaped speakers on coiled phone wires that once you pressed the button on the display, played back info into your ear. Those were iconic and were at most displays.
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  #33  
Old 01-31-2018, 09:33 PM
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luke strawwalker luke strawwalker is offline
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Originally Posted by PhantomCruiser View Post
There is a term for that we use (and are guilty of) here in the nuclear power industry, "Institutional Arrogance". Our managers here got a letter last year from the NRC informing them that there was a "chilled work environment" here, meaning that the line workers were reluctant to bring up safety issues for fear of reprisal.

Of course managers explain their way out of trouble and roll the problem back onto the maintenance workers...

It's all fun and games until something bad happens.
YUP!!! I could tell you some stories from when I worked at the South Texas Nuclear Project... LOL

Later! OL J R
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  #34  
Old 01-31-2018, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by airdave View Post
Thats a National geographic supplement.
I knew I recognized it.
We've been collecting Nat Geos for decades...most are gone now,
but I have a huge box full of the Maps and Poster supplements saved.

Sure enough, I have this one from 1973.
I don't think its ever been unfolded! Looks mint shape.
What am I going to do with it?

There was also a really cool Mars map/poster from 73 (shown in the photo).
Its neat to see how much newer information has been acquired over the years.
The reverse side has a painting...an Artist's interpretation of the Martian surface.
Obviously long before we had landed anything on the surface.

Oh yeah, that Astronaut poster has the Apollo photo of Earth on the reverse as Mark Hansen suggested.

This is a very cool thread...brings back memories for me too.
Nothing as exciting as some of the stories so far...
but I visited Cape Canaveral in 1982....or was it "Kennedy Space Center"?
Just took the normal Visitors tour and saw whatever was there at the time.
No Space Shuttle unfortunately...I remember it had taken off a few days before we got there.

But I did get to to see the display Saturn V which I heard is now rusting away in storage.

I bought some souvenirs. I'll see what i can dig up.

I have some photos from that trip...although they have strangely discoloured over the years.
I'll scan the prints and post them in my photo gallery.
(Somewhere I have the original negatives, but I don't think its worth the trouble to hunt for them.
I'll just scan the 5"x7" prints and clean them up a bit)
I've got a couple of the NatGeo lunar and Mars maps in poster frames in my office... (which is now storage at the moment). They look great hanging framed on the wall...

Later! OL J R
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  #35  
Old 01-31-2018, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by beckychestney View Post
Yes, that's Roger Boisjoly's testimony
Yep, I've read several different accounts of the Challenger disaster.

Currently I'm about halfway through Book 4 of Boris Chertok's seminal history of the Soviet space program, from his personal files and memories, called "Rockets and People". It's an outstanding series of books, uber-detailed (almost to the point of tediousness, if one isn't into extreme detail) but it's very revealing about the differences of how their program and ours worked.

Later! OL J R
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  #36  
Old 02-02-2018, 11:31 AM
markcable markcable is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luke strawwalker View Post
Yep, I've read several different accounts of the Challenger disaster.

Currently I'm about halfway through Book 4 of Boris Chertok's seminal history of the Soviet space program, from his personal files and memories, called "Rockets and People". It's an outstanding series of books, uber-detailed (almost to the point of tediousness, if one isn't into extreme detail) but it's very revealing about the differences of how their program and ours worked.

Later! OL J R
Chertok's book is pretty fascinating. Really interesting to see the space race from the other side.
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  #37  
Old 02-04-2018, 10:48 PM
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Chertok's book is pretty fascinating. Really interesting to see the space race from the other side.
Yes it is...

Later! OL J R
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  #38  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:05 AM
Algebraist Algebraist is offline
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I have been reading this thread from the start. Obviously there have been a lot of posts about the sad deaths of people killed in the space programme (17 people have died during a space flight and 13 have died during spaceflight testing or training, and another number of people killed due to accidents in developing hardware) which is of course sobering and it is quite right all of these people are remembered.

But Becky's thread is also about hope, optimism and inspiration. So in that vein....

Quote:
Originally Posted by beckychestney View Post

... So. Do you remember a specific time or a special event related to NASA or any space program (no matter where on earth it operates out of) that inspired you to learn?....
Absolutely.

For me it was the manned flights of the Apollo programme in particular views like this



I was (I think) the perfect impressionable age to get caught up by the manned programme to the moon.

In the UK, TV coverage was pretty limited (there were only 3 channels back then, BBC1, BBC2 and ITV)which broadcast for a few hours each day. For the Apollo missions special programmes were put on. I recall we watched the BBC and their programme were mostly 3 people in a studio, Patrick Moore an astronomer, James Burke, (a linguist) to explain all the technical stuff and Cliff Michelmore as host. (Only a few minutes of those broadcast programmes remain the rest apparently wiped or lost). The only TV pictures were those from NASA of the Saturn V on the pad at launch, Mission Control room at Huston (like above) or TV broadcasts from the Apollo spacecrafts.

Sometimes newspapers would have really nice cut away pictures of these fantastic moon machines or diagrams explaining the mission.

I was lucky in my father was able to explain some of the things to me. He had been in the RAF (UK air force) for a decade and was something technical in ground crew. He used to go to air craft crashes, spent quite a bit of time attached to USAF bases and once told me about installing a liquid oxygen making plant.

So I wanted to go to the moon (who didn't/doesn't) but he was able to explain that it takes a huge number of people doing all sorts of jobs to make that happen and right at the heart of every problem that had to be solved was a maths problem that had to be solved first. "That room is full of maths PhD's" he would tell me (the room being the one in the picture above). So I wanted to be a maths PhD (whatever that was) because it sounded great to solve how to go to the moon and beyond!

Anyway I just kept doing stuff your average child does, namely, playing with toys. Together we watching man land on the moon at 4.00am Monday morning 21st July 1969 and then I went to school that day. We watched all the Apollo moon landings and of course Apollo 13 as well as the moment the last person stepped off the moon. Apollo was cancelled and it was incredible just how quickly it was forgotten in the UK. Certainly from a media point of view.

All the time through school I kept trying to be good at maths, thinking maybe one day I would work for NASA and they would go back to the moon and Mars. The space shuttle came but not the return to the moon or going to Mars.

After school I went on to do a degree in maths. It turned out I was quite good a maths and went on to get a PhD in maths. Funny enough the sort of maths that is used for space exploration is not what I found the most exciting. I found an area called algebra the most interesting and to this day I am still an "Algebraist". I remember getting my PhD and phoning my father (he did not know what a PhD really was) but he remembered telling me about them during the Apollo missions. He died not long after.

Epilogue: I had always wanted to see a Saturn V in real life though never thought it would happen. However in the mid 1990's I was lucky enough to go to Florida for a holiday and visited KSC. Had a great time but the Saturn V was no longer on display for the public to see. Sigh. I thought I would never get to see it now.

Then in 2005 I was lucky enough to go to WDW and also to KSC again. This time the Saturn V was on display in its own building. If you haven't seen it and get a chance to I would encourage you to go. It was brilliant the way you were introduced to it, I wont say how, except nothing, and I mean nothing, can prepare you for seeing this magnificent machine in the flesh the way it was arranged. When I stood there and saw it with my wife and children beside me, it was as if time had stopped for a few moments as so many happy moments flashed through my mind, from the days of Apollo with my father right up to that moment of a great holiday with my family. Apollo/Saturn V inspired me to do maths and doing the maths eventually enabled me to see Apollo/Saturn V. Funny how things turn out.
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  #39  
Old 02-13-2018, 07:35 AM
PhantomCruiser PhantomCruiser is offline
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Yes I was so glad KSC finally restored the Saturn V, and I agree that introduction is very well presented. Did you see the (never to fly) Apollo 18 LEM hanging above the dining area? If you ever get to Huntsville, they've cleaned up their Saturn V too. So of the three remaining Saturn V rockets, I've seen two of them (I've got to get to Houston sometime).

My mother said I was sitting in the living room floor as a baby watching Neil and Buzz walk on the moon. I do remember Shepard "playing golf", ASTP and Skylab. And of course, I hope everyone my age remembers the Enterprise rolling out for her the big Orbiter reveal.

I'll freely admit that I'm a romantic when it comes to spaceflight and (hopefully) future space travel. My heart soars when they get it right: SpaceX first ever booster landing, first landing on the droneship, Discovery as she made the Shuttle fleet's "Return to Flight" (twice). Hubble! Hubble Deep Field (1 and 2), Phoenix lander, the Mars rovers (all of them), ISS under construction (and every time it flies overhead and I can see it). And I'm saddened when it goes wrong: I saw on replay Challanger, I watched live as Columbia died, read about Apollo 1, and the Nedelen Disaster.

Both lists go on and on, but I can hope that mankind will continue the search for knowledge, among our celestial neighbors and eventually maybe beyond.
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  #40  
Old 02-13-2018, 08:47 PM
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beckychestney beckychestney is offline
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Well said! Great stories!

I'm not sure if I can pull it off, but most of our photography back then was done with Super 8. Including a mess of footage from tours of KSC. If I can figure out how I'll post some of the best stuff to YouTube. But keep your fingers crossed, I'm not even sure if the bulb in the projector is good. But one thing I know for sure is that I liked to turn the camera sideways and get a "looking up at it" shot of the Saturn V stack!
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