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  #11  
Old 08-22-2016, 12:26 PM
Lighter Lighter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diderick A. den Bakker View Post
For realistic coal, google for 'chicken grit'
Or find a lump of coal and get a hammer.
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  #12  
Old 08-22-2016, 04:02 PM
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Mike Stamper Mike Stamper is offline
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On my Steam roller I bough a bag of cork bits - I got it from a railway model shop. I think the railway people use it for ballast between the rails. I made a false bottom to the coal bin and glued on a layer of cork. I painted this a semi gloss black then added another layer of cork and painted that. you can add as many layer as you want!

Cheers

Mike
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  #13  
Old 08-29-2016, 07:23 AM
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Erik Zwaan Erik Zwaan is offline
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Still working on the tender

Thanks again guys for your reactions and suggestions regarding a more realistic look of the coal! This fueled an idea. At home we used to have a tropical aquarium and the water filter core was filled with active coal. I found a small container with refill coal in our garden shed, which will be quite useful when the time has arrived. Won’t need a hammer to break it, probably crushing between the fingers will do.

Continued with the body of the tender and installed several parts on the front and back side. Some of these parts are more or less box shaped and need to be glued onto each other. Accuracy of fitting can be significantly improved if you laminate the inside of those boxes with thin board (0.5mm thickness or similar). Because of this reinforcement, gluing them together is so much easier and by far more accurate. It takes extra time but the effort pays off.

Despite spraying the model sheets with varnish before starting the work, which makes both print and paper stronger, the print remains very vulnerable and damages easily. Unfortunately some damage occurred to the grey print at the tunnel shaped connecting piece between tender and front coach as you can see in one of the pictures. There’s probably a proper English word for it but I wouldn’t even know the Dutch word….
I’m using Tamiya Sky Grey for touch-ups but this is not exactly the same. In any case, care remains required at all times is the lesson learned here.

At this point in the build the rolling chassis has to be prepared, as per the building instructions. There are still remaining parts to be installed on the body but that will be done later. Most of them are small and vulnerable so it’s good to keep them for last.

The undercarriage is quite a bit of work and definitely not finished yet as you can see. The various holes for the wheel axes can best be made by the sort of puncher as shown in the picture. Very, very useful tool! The formers of the wheels come with the laser cut package. They are a bit too large and need sanding down in order for wheel rims 140c to fit properly. Consequently, this requires trimming of the outside radius of each wheel cover (part 140) by approximately 0.5mm.
One “guinea pig” wheel is ready, and the other 7 are due to follow.

Hopefully I can finish them in the coming week, allowing me to concentrate on the wheel axes, brake rigging and other related details over the weekend. The entire assembly looks relatively complicated and needs a bit of studying in advance.
It’s like the excitement one feels before going on vacation . Interesting model to make, that’s for sure!

Erik
Attached Thumbnails
A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3517.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3519.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3520.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3521.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3522.jpg  

A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3514.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3515.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3523.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3524.jpg  
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  #14  
Old 08-29-2016, 10:01 AM
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Tim Crowe Tim Crowe is offline
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Nice work on the wheels

Tim
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  #15  
Old 08-29-2016, 03:02 PM
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romanmodels romanmodels is online now
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making good progress
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David........... paper modeling give's you a happy high........ currently building . Sherman firefly. Sd.anh.166.

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  #16  
Old 08-30-2016, 12:11 AM
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Marcin Jakubiec Marcin Jakubiec is offline
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So far this model doesn't look very complicated or difficult, but looks very nice.

Was it printed by inkjet printer???

I'd make this model very glossy - just for better effect
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  #17  
Old 08-31-2016, 07:05 AM
ricleite ricleite is offline
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Hello Erik
0,5mm is a lot!!! When I started reading, the idea of printing the rim in thinner paper immediately popped up but 0,5mm is far too much. Would it be possible to print the wheels at 1,01 scale (or whatever) to circumvent the need for trimming the laser cut parts?
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2016, 06:39 AM
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Erik Zwaan Erik Zwaan is offline
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Tender rolling chassis

Hi guys, back with an update and thanks once more for your reactions.

@Marcin Jakubiec: The model was already printed, I didn't download it. I've scanned it and printed a few sheets for use in case needed, but that's a laser print. Color differences exist but not too tremendous.

@ Ricardo: The fitting issue it's not as bad as it seems and was solved easily. The wheels are made up of two circles of which the inner is slightly greater than the outer, with a tapered running tread in between that rests on the rails. The core of the wheel is made up of the laser cut former. The laser cut is slightly too large as the tread (part no. 140c) cannot be closed. It’s just one millimeter too tight so the former needs to be trimmed a little. Using thinner paper won’t help the situation. Because the outer circle (part no 140) has the same diameter as the former, this should also be made slightly smaller. Resulting in a correct wheel, with a small rim around the inner circle that nicely fits within the rails. It's shown in one of the pictures.

It took a few hours to finish the wheels, axles and other suspension related parts. The wheels fit exactly in between the “caves” of the undercarriage, which helps to position them properly.
The four axles were rolled into a tube and butt glued. To shape them properly I pushed in sections of a skewer with a few wraps of thin paper around it to get an exact fit. I won’t advertise it but those corn skewers of KFC are extremely handy for this purpose. I slightly narrowed down the axle diameter to ensure a better fit at the wheels.
At first I thought to make a rolling assembly but as the wheels fit so tightly in the chassis and the fact that the locomotive will not be able to move, there’s no point in doing so.
The easiest way to install the wheel assembly is to glue the wheels pair-wisely into position by aligning the holes through chassis and wheel center, and then push the axle right through and a final check if everything is straight and level.
The axle ends stick out on either side of the chassis, which will be covered by part 139. I’m not sure what these are called but I reckon each contains a spring to act as a shock damper. I still have to finalize other suspension parts and am considering detailing these a bit further.
Next will be the brake section and the scoop-like structure at the bottom side (part 137). In one of the pictures you can already see the laser cut core of the braking bars with brake shoes and other rods/bar connections.
I didn't take a picture of it yet but when you place chassis and body onto each other it definitely starts to look like a tender!
Cheers,
Erik
Attached Thumbnails
A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3527.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3528.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3532.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3533.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3534.jpg  

A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3535.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3531.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3545.jpg   A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-img_3547.jpg  
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  #19  
Old 09-05-2016, 07:37 AM
Diderick A. den Bakker's Avatar
Diderick A. den Bakker Diderick A. den Bakker is offline
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They are called axle boxes. They do indeed allow for a very slight amount of lateral movement in curves.
And it is really a scoop. On long, level stretches a trough was constructed between the rails and filled with water. The scoop was lowered and raised by hand at normal speed - sometimes the watertank overflowed rather dramatically. Have seen a picture somewhere, will try to find it again!
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  #20  
Old 09-05-2016, 07:45 AM
Diderick A. den Bakker's Avatar
Diderick A. den Bakker Diderick A. den Bakker is offline
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Have found some more great pictures of scooping etc - go to David Heys steam diesel photo collection - 13 - TEBAY, LUNE VALLEY & SHAP
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A4 Pacific Sir Nigel Gresley, O-scale-out_west_l.jpg  
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