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  #11  
Old 12-28-2010, 03:07 PM
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Ron40 Ron40 is offline
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Ruben,
The parts needing blue color are on pages 6,8,9,11 &13. I was attempting to
color these parts in my feeble way with windows paint program. The duplicate
parts are for the landing gear, engine cowling and nacelles and the cockpit.
Hand coloring these parts with water color or markers produces uneven
coloring due to paper absorption of the inks. On the seats all are the same
with the exception of the pilot and copilot seats. Hope this is of some help.

Ron
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2010, 07:29 PM
Zathros Zathros is offline
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Great job! Your work is excellent and i will also follow very closely. There is much I need to learn and your gracious explanations are invaluable. Muchisimo Gracias Amigo!!
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  #13  
Old 12-28-2010, 08:24 PM
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ashevilleangler ashevilleangler is offline
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Ruben, Thanks for taking on this very large and difficult project. I also appreciate your detailed but easy to understand explanation of the process. I now realize that even I possess the proper software and potentially the skills to someday do a decent repaint or perhaps even an original design.

Curt
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  #14  
Old 12-29-2010, 09:01 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Pages 1, 2 & 3 are ready.

As expected, lots of time were saved thanks to pages 1&2 being the same drawing, but mirrored.
So it was only a matter of copying the objects and using the mirror tool:
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-12-1-2mirror.jpg


Since all the objects are mirrored, numbers have to be restored to normal by mirroring them again.
The tools for text are slightly different, but serve the same purpose.
Numbers need to be edited anyway because they are different parts:
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-13-2mirrirb.jpg

After comparing the original page, and editing small details (re-place some parts and erase the registry number) page 2 is ready.

Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-14-1-2-final.jpg


Page 3 was also nice to vectorize.
Although there are 89 parts on this page alone, with hundreds of lines, I only had to trace 11 parts with a few lines each, and repeat them.
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-15-3couple.jpg

Sadly, not all the other pages look this easy



This page 3 shows how Mr. Zorn thought about the modelers:
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-16-3score.jpg
You save a lot of time by scoring several parts at once before cutting, and cutting is also a fast process given the placement of the parts.


In this page I found part 114 especially strange:
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-17-strange.jpg
Some details of the piece are not regular as could be expected.
Instead of attempting to “correct” this, I decided to leave it as it is.
In complex pieces like this I prefer to stick to the original lines, instead of re-creating the shape.

What do you think about this details?



Another detail I would like to share, piece 109.

When printing, grey is not a plain color.
It is a set of black dots of different sizes, spaced evenly at certain distance.
The human eye then merges the dots with the white background of the paper, and creates grey.

This pattern of dots interacts with the black lines and shapes of the part.
And distort them.

The (very) little black shape is distorted by the surrounding black dots of the halftone pattern.
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-18-page3blot.jpg
I need your help:
What shape do you think it is?
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-19-109detailb.jpg
I can’t discern whether it is a circle, an oval, or an angular shape.
I drew an undefined random shape, and probably once assembled this black dot is the less important thing in the model.
But if you know what is the correct shape for this black blot please guide me in the right way.

See you next week after the end of year rush!
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  #15  
Old 12-29-2010, 09:21 AM
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Looking great Ruben. I have no idea what the purpose of the the
area you have noted but looking at the original model sheet it
shows up as you have it drawn in the uncolored version ...Ron
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  #16  
Old 12-29-2010, 09:50 AM
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Ron40 Ron40 is offline
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On the reference to part 114 I would go with the original
outline as you have done. Not having built the model yet
it is only my opinion to stick with the original. Maybe Boats
can offer some insight on this....Ron
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  #17  
Old 12-29-2010, 10:53 AM
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Leif Ohlsson Leif Ohlsson is offline
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Ruben,

As far as I can figure out, the little black dot you're asking about in part 109 would be a sort of graphic interpretation of a spark plug. There should be a similar one in the black area on the other side of the part. Do I detect a whitish area there?

Not that you should worry about it now, but the oval shapes which you have drawn in different sizes probably represent cylinder head cooling fins. I think they are one size only in the original. But then again, they should be drawn at 90° to what they are now. If so, this is a fault in the original design (these things do happen...).

A small correction since I noticed - the two topmost fold lines are drawn as a "Fold up" lines, while they should be "Fold down", as you have drawn it on the part itself. Also, as far as I can figure out, the vertical fold line should be "Fold down", whatever way the original is drawn. That is the only way I can make sense of the folding of this part. Step 83 in the instructions carries a reasonably good illustration of how part 109 is folded. All folds are 90° I think.

As for part 114, I will definitely cut it out as regular, as you expected to start with, whatever shape the original is drawn. See illustration at step 84 in the instructions. Nothing but a regular pattern makes any sense, I think.

Leif

Last edited by Leif Ohlsson; 12-29-2010 at 11:03 AM.
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  #18  
Old 12-29-2010, 11:53 AM
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BILL AMOS BILL AMOS is offline
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i commend you on your talent and hard work..and i thank you for sharing with us..i hope you get a job soon thanks bill amos
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  #19  
Old 12-29-2010, 12:29 PM
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whulsey whulsey is offline
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First good luck in you job search. Second, wow, thank you so much. Will be following your progress with great anticipation.
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  #20  
Old 12-29-2010, 05:56 PM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leif Ohlsson View Post
Ruben,

As far as I can figure out, the little black dot you're asking about in part 109 would be a sort of graphic interpretation of a spark plug. There should be a similar one in the black area on the other side of the part. Do I detect a whitish area there?

Not that you should worry about it now, but the oval shapes which you have drawn in different sizes probably represent cylinder head cooling fins. I think they are one size only in the original. But then again, they should be drawn at 90° to what they are now. If so, this is a fault in the original design (these things do happen...).

A small correction since I noticed - the two topmost fold lines are drawn as a "Fold up" lines, while they should be "Fold down", as you have drawn it on the part itself. Also, as far as I can figure out, the vertical fold line should be "Fold down", whatever way the original is drawn. That is the only way I can make sense of the folding of this part. Step 83 in the instructions carries a reasonably good illustration of how part 109 is folded. All folds are 90° I think.

As for part 114, I will definitely cut it out as regular, as you expected to start with, whatever shape the original is drawn. See illustration at step 84 in the instructions. Nothing but a regular pattern makes any sense, I think.

Leif

Leif, thanks for your observations. They truly help me a lot.

It was fool from me not to see the instructions.
They are clear enough to see that the folding lines
were indeed wrong in my version and how some parts work.

And yes, once some contrast and brightness is applied,
a white dot appears amidst the black area on the other side.
Most probably, as you said, a spark plug.

I'm not sure about the cooling fins.
So I decided to make two versions:
one as the original model presents them, and one at 90ş.
The second version will probably be available as an add-on option.
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-20-109a.jpg


I also redraw 114, to make it more regular.
The difference is minimal, but I think it really works.
Re-colouring the Ford Trimotor by Peter Zorn-21-114b.jpg


A few minutes ago I was looking for visual references
to confirm the correct design of this parts, and found
a couple of nice photos that I would like to share:

One from Airliners, that shows an abandoned tri-motor.
The engines can be seen without cowlings,
showing part 114 in all its nakedness.
Photos: Ford 5-AT-C Trimotor Aircraft Pictures | Airliners.net


And another nice picture that made me laugh, from a restoration project:



I really love that sentence!!!
The photo is found at:
Ford Tri-Motor List


Now..... I also found a couple of links
that will be useful as reference for details of the parts,
and that any person building this model will find more than useful:

Photos of the original N9683 that Peter Zorn out in paper:
(Russian text, but several nice photos)
?????? ???? - ???????????? ??????????????? ????? ? ?????????? ?.3:Ford Tri-Motor(????????? ????????)

Photos of another beautiful tri-motor:
(also Russian, but wonderful images)
igor113 - ????? 2010 ?.20:Ford Tri-Motor ?.1: ?? ??????????? ???????

A restoration of a tri-motor in 2002:
HOV-AIRE, Inc

And yet another restoration:
Rebuilding the Ford Tri-Motor Planes N1077 and N7584

And....
a link to an RC forum where a person is making
a Ford Tri-motor from scratch....
using wood and corrugated metal sheets as main structural materials
Scratchbuilding a 1/32 1927 Ford AT-4 Trimotor - ARC Air Discussion Forums


Now is almost time for dinner.
See you!
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