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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2011, 02:05 PM
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Standing by to see how you work with that foam...never understood clearly how or why that technique was used on hulls but I can get a good sense on how that might be very useful in working the extremely curved areas of a sub hull like you are doing here. What do you use to remove the foam to it's present state, and how do you approach this without removing some of the card formers in the process? I think it would be interesting to those of us not familiar with this technique to hear how this is done, if you could.

Happy New Year!!

Cheers!
Jim
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Old 12-31-2011, 02:29 PM
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Hello Jim

When I used the foam for the first time (on a different model), skeleton has deformed. it happened, because I used the foam incorrectly. Previously I applied foam in the upper side first and then on the lower side of the submarine. Now I was applying it in a ''spiral''. I hope you know what I mean If you don't, I can always draw you a graph. I removed the foam with long, sharp kitchen knife, next I used emery paper to even the surface. Before working with foam I secured card formers, by dripping them with super glue, so they were much more resistant to cutting; of course, you still have to be very careful while removing the foam. Now, the main body is very strong, I can imagine how tough it is going to be after applying a plaster
All the foam and plaster applying make the build much more time consuming, but it's work it, as it's impossible to get the ''cow's ribs effect''.

Happy New Year!

Adam
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2011, 02:47 PM
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Thank you very much, Adam, your description is very clear...I appreciate the reason for using CA on the formers to give you a stronger basis for this technique. In some way this is similar to a double planking method on a wooden ship build, except you use foam rather than a first layer of rough planking...of course using foam on a complex curved form such as the submarine hull makes more sense given the surfaces you are working with. We also used a very thin plaster like coating which was then sanded smooth when dry, eliminating cracks and imperfections before applying the final surface, whether it be another layer of wooden planking or cooper plates.

I look forward to seeing your futher updates to see how you work the foam further with the plaster surface coat to create a smooth surface...do you then apply a finish coat of paint or do you then use the hull plating from the kit?

I like the visual by using the term "cow's ribs" ... we have seen this on real ships, caused by the buffeting effect of the sea against the steel hull plating, but I have to admit I have never seen this on the sides of submarines.

Thank you again for taking the time to explain this technique, I do appreciate it very much!

Cheers!
Jim
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:41 AM
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Adam,
See what we're doing is an impressive work! Thanks for having exposed so clearly this technique!

Marco
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:45 PM
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Thanks for all nice words

Main body is filled and abraded. I did not abraded it perfectly as I will put original paper coating on it. Before I'll do it, I have to make silos and rockets.
That's how it looks at the moment.

Regards,
Adam
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2012, 02:04 PM
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Very, very nice! Rapidly taking on the smooth shape of a submarine!

Cheers!
Jim
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2012, 05:16 PM
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Thumbs up

Hiob: I am watching with interest!!
Jim
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:49 PM
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Excellent work so far. I loved the photos of the expanding foam covering! But it looks like you have overcome your mixed media approach to filling up all that space.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2012, 12:21 PM
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Thank you for nice comments

I'm glad that so many of you are watching this build.

Jay, I'm trying to use many different materials to improve models' quality and toughness. I know it's not a ''standard'' paper-only model, but Kursk isn't just any paper model, because of it's size I had to move many times in my life, and I know how it affects paper models :/ Also I started to attend model shows, so it's also important for me to make sure they will come back home in one piece.

Best regards,
Adam
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Old 01-06-2012, 02:28 PM
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Hiob: the concept of "Mixed-media modelling" poses no moral problem for me!! I am enjoying your progress on "Kursk" and have already learned many things from your techniques!

Happy New Year from
Your Canadian friend,
Jim
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