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  #31  
Old 01-04-2021, 10:04 AM
RdK RdK is offline
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Cool ...Surprising visitor...

Hi there!

@Dough: Thanks! When will you start your HMS Victory?

@Mike: Thanks! It is nice to tell stories now that we have to live with many restrictions and hobbies getting limited, all too often to indoors. The story around the Galleon Neptune develops from some of the comments here and from how the model is getting along...So here's another chapter...
Also I managed to upload a short video about the idea of the flickering. At that time the model did not have the hull yet, but it shows what I meant with four different flickering lines... :

Neptune-LED-Candles-version1 on Vimeo

The problem now is that the LEDs I use are very small and not as bright as I'd hoped for. So while trying to get the sides done, I tested with some first templates (Pic.1) how it shines through the gun ports and you can barely see it. I then started to glue the aluminum foil onto the gun deck, which improves the visibility a bit, but I think I still have to add some foil to the main frame in the back of the decks, which will be a bit of annoying fiddling...

@Ab: Thanks! But if, then it should be me who is envious. You are the only one apart from me I know who uses this method to build hulls with only one layer of card and no filler! And compared to me you made already so many hulls and they all look so much better than mine! And I thank you for advertising this method on all the ship model forums! I hope people will try it out. Mike for instance, you could try it with your Neptune build.
Also, I kind of used a filler, the half-dried white glue (at least it was still useful for something...) to mainly correct for the mistake I did with the very moist wood-glue that caused the "ripple"-effect to appear. Lesson learned!



...Febrero anno domini 1669...

"Hmph! Why did he toss those Ordenanzas down the cliff when he still needs them..."
...murmured the young Antonio Gaztańeta, while climbing down the cliff to search for the book that Seńor Radék del Sól de la Santa Crúz de Brazíl threw so elegantly towards the turquis blue sea, only to realize moments later that the work is not done yet, thus sending the boy down to the beach. With a hangover so strong that even Dionysus could be proud of (for the boy was just getting 15 and was not used to drinking a lot of the sweet grape-juice), he carefully climbed down and after a while found the book washed back ashore, soaked with salty water through and through! While holding at a distance with two fingers and slowly lifting the wet, now useless book-shaped piece of rag, his eyes barely able to focus at the close object, he noticed something in the far distance on the horizon...

"Ay caramba! Un barco holandés!!" He uttered and run up quickly to tell the news to his master about the arrival of a dutch merchant ship (Pic. 2).
As it turned out, it was the arrival of a West Indies ship, for after Netherlands had to give up their possessions in Brazil and Olinda through the Treaty of The Hague in 1661, they yet continued their trade with Portugal. On board was an old friend of seńor Radék del Sól, a dutch naturalist of great fame in the Dutch Republic by the name Frans Janszoon Post (Pic. 3).

"I admire the beautiful shape of the hull of your ship, Radék. Indeed I am almost envious, may God forgive...Tell me, please some of the stories you went through, it has been a long time!"

"Hah! There is nothing to be envious of! But I accept your compliments. Let me tell you the secret to a good hull...It lies in applying, what a brilliant scholar by the name Issac Newton, from England - God forbid! -"

"God forbid!" ...replied the eagerly listening dutch friend, when Radék continued:

"..What he discovered in his 'Quaestiones quaedam philosophicae' about the mechanics and calculating the round shapes of bodies! May he one day hopefully publish this..this...infinitesimal calculus, for lack of a better word! It will revolutionize the way we all look at numbers!"

Days past while the two friends discussed Radék's escape from Santa Lucía to Olinda, the raids of the Pirate Bartholomew Redd and Henry Morgan on the coasts, the loss of Radék's famous rum, while enjoying some classy dutch beer from the popular Amsterdam brewery De Hooiberg, established since 1592 and discussed the many wonders that Frans already saw during his first trip to Brazil, while it was still under Dutch control. He then went on to continue his tour to study and paint the beautiful sceneries of the former Nieuw-Holland, painting Olinda and even including the shipyard of Radék del Sól in one of his paintings! (pictures 4 & 5). History never acknowledged the second trip of Frans Post to Brazil and considered his later paintings of it as imaginations from the first trip and exaggerations in colors, for they themselves, maybe being envious - God forbid! - have never seen the beauty of the colorful tropics...
Attached Thumbnails
Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn047.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_dutch_west_india_at_olinda.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_frans_post.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_frans_post_view_of_the_ruins_of_olinda_brazil.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_frans_post_-_gezicht_op_olinda.jpg  

__________________
On the Ocean: Koga Elbląska, Mayflower
On the Rollfield: Horten GO-229
In the Shipyard: Neptune, LaRenommee
In the Garage: PANHARD AML20

Last edited by RdK; 01-04-2021 at 10:15 AM.
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  #32  
Old 01-04-2021, 11:51 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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You are an excellent writer Senhor Radék del Sól, and, while sipping some of your famous Rum, I have enjoyed reading about your adventures.
Thank you for the painting showing us the location of your shipyard. I hope it is safe from the raids of Pirate Bartholomew Redd - -God Forbid!
Also . . . I viewed your short video of the Flickering LED Candles. Wonderful idea! Impressive project.

Saudaçőes,
Miguel De Nevado Norte

Last edited by Michael Mash; 01-04-2021 at 12:11 PM. Reason: Added comment.
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  #33  
Old 01-10-2021, 06:14 AM
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JCK JCK is offline
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That´s a big challange! But you can handle it!
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  #34  
Old 01-10-2021, 08:16 AM
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firdajan2 firdajan2 is offline
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You should write a book, Mr. Radék del Sól
I hope you´ll put one more layer of planking. It looks to be a quite big model.

Jan
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  #35  
Old 01-10-2021, 12:35 PM
bussolino bussolino is offline
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RdK hello.

congratulations on your construction.
with permission I go on board to better see the construction works.

I have always wanted to build a galleon of the "manila galleons" type.
but information is rare.

who knows maybe after the French vessel I will also look for a ship that strikes the imagination.

I wish you a good job and happy I launch ship at the right time.
salutoni marco
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  #36  
Old 01-20-2021, 11:54 AM
RdK RdK is offline
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Red face Timber Troubles...

Hi there!

@ JCK: Big challenge and I hope I can handle it. Just a matter of time and patience…

@ Miguel De Nevado Norte and Jan: No book writing for me. First I have to finish my ship model projects… And Jan: There will be no further planking, only the self adhesive foil. There is simply no need for another layer of planking, the hull is fair as it is now. The model will be some 50-60cm long. Despite the scale of 1:100…

@ bussolino: I glued the main deck on the frames so yes, it is now possible to go on deck… :D Welcome! And making a model without plans is really fun as you can dive very deep into the history of ship building, just ask Mike!
Strongly recommended!



I hoped to make this post about the planking of the ready hull, but I have encountered a few troubles on the way to the upper hull… Although I am keenly waiting for that part of the build (my favorite part), it has to wait still a bit.

One issue, due to my inexperience with a solder device, is that some of the contacts in the extension of my LED strip got loose and I had to open the gun deck, get access to the loose contact and re-solder it again (pic. 1).

Another problem is that there is still so much to do before I can glue all the decks in place and then the sides of the hull and I find myself constantly changing some of the already glued parts… One good example was the drilling of the gun ports for the chasers in the bow forecastle, as mentioned in the last post. Also I had to cut and trim the parts of the frames that are exactly where the gun ports will be. I had to use quite some strong pliers for that. The scalpel was too thin...So I take it a bit slower and try to think more before gluing pieces in place…

And in addition, while looking at some pictures of the Neptune I noticed that, because it is just a prop (theatrical property), the forecastle is only half a man-size tall and there are stairs going down “half-a-deck” into the forecastle (pic. 2), which then in turn displaces the guns inside in such a way that they have to look quite into the sky, in order to fit outside the round gun-ports (pic. 3), which in turn should be aligned with the other gun ports of the main deck (all the upper most round gun ports of the ship). (Puh.. quite a long sentence, I hope you get what I mean… )
So I decided to raise it a bit, while still mimic the real ship design of the entrances as close as possible, while making the whole structure taller. I had to re-think and change the design of the two entrances to the forecastle, leaving it with only one step down, next to the stairs that lead to the lower deck as you can see with my little shipwright standing in or near the entrance. (pics. 4 to 6). After that I could finally glue the main deck in place. This is important so I can work on the hull sides and see where the deck starts and the inner parts of the sides become visible.

Another issue is the fitting before/underneath the quarter deck. The ship has a steering wheel (pic. 7), which is quite early for this period (1670CE), but not entirely impossible, more on that in a later post. The point is that I won’t be able to fit it there once the quarter deck is glued in place.
There are also stairs behind the mizzen mast leading up to the quarter deck, which I have to make, as well as the walls of the side structure and other things.

Also, since I have no plans and the whole ship so far is not exactly symmetric , I need to check each gun port in its relative position to the lower gun decks and where the gun carriages will be placed there. For that I had to construct a sample gun (pic. 8), which I took from my plans for the model of the galleon ‘Nuestra Seńora de la Concepción y de las Ánimas’ (1687–1705) (pic. 9). More on the cannon itself in a later post.

I then “dry-fitted” each carriage position with the gun and marked the differences in height of certain gun carriages (pics. 10, 11). Some are 5.5mm high, others are 6.5mm and one even 7mm high on the starboard side. I made the carriages from a 2mm card with a 1mm bottom, colored brown with a paint marker and glued in place (pics. 12, 13). The cut-out gun ports from the side hull-modules (made from 1mm frozen pizza box) are saved for later, when I will make the gun port lids (pic.14).

So for now I am working on small deck fittings, stairs and the walls so I can glue all decks in place and continue the work on the side modules.

So much for now!

-RdK



…Febrero Anno Domini 1669…

The progress of the Neptune turned out to be of a challenge for Radék de la Sol del Santa Crúz de Brazil… Some challenges were the almost unbearably high temperatures during this time of the year, but Radék del Sol knew that the rainy season is yet to come! So he needed to speed up the cutting down of the required mahogany timbers…

…Upon arriving at the forest he noticed a strange sound as if bells were ringing from a church.

“That cannot be, it is not Sunday, yet..” he thought and soon discovered that the workers had trouble with cutting down the trees, as the sabicu tree, which was required for the frames was “a very rigid wood that demanded great effort to work”. It became later known as the sapucaia from the Lecythidaceae nut-tree family with beautiful flowers (pic. 15) and a funny named nut fruit, called ‘Monkey Pot’.
Mr. Miller Shawn wrote later in his work about “Fruitless Trees: Portuguese Conservation and Brazil's Colonial Timber.” (2000, Stanford University Press, Stanford) that it 'was used by Portuguese shipwrights in Brazil for keels, frames, and other large timbers and was so hard that axes were known to ring like bells during felling, if they did not break outright'.

“Master Seńor Radék del Sol, we are soon run out of axes, and iron is not easy to get by in the Indies…” complained the lumberman master.

“Then I order you to concentrate on the ‘capá and maría mahogany’ trees instead, which I prefer for the ongoing planking work.” Replied Radék del Sol del Santa Crúz.

And so the work in the shipyard could continue slowly but steady with the lower hull and the gun ports (pic. 16). But meanwhile Radék de la Sol del Santa Crúz de Brazil started to plan a short trip to the Habana astilleros, as he received a letter from another famous shipwright in the Americas, named Miguél De Nevado Norte regarding new iron works and constructions of very heavy cannons…

..."
Attached Thumbnails
Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn049.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_castillo_outside.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_castillo_inside.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn051.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn052.jpg  

Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn053.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn050.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn054.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn055.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn056.jpg  

Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn057.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn058.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn059.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn060.jpg   Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_sapucaia_tree_flower.jpg  

Spanish pirate galleon "Neptune" 1:100 (scratch build)-sgn_construction.jpg  
__________________
On the Ocean: Koga Elbląska, Mayflower
On the Rollfield: Horten GO-229
In the Shipyard: Neptune, LaRenommee
In the Garage: PANHARD AML20

Last edited by RdK; 01-20-2021 at 12:50 PM. Reason: correcting spelling mistakes
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  #37  
Old 01-20-2021, 02:20 PM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Bueno Senhor Radék del Sól del Santa Crúz de Brazil,
I read with great alarm the difficulties you encountered with your new “Flickering Lights” technology. God help us. But your skills are legendary, so the delay is temporary, no doubt.

Also . . . . It is comforting to myself, and others as well, that you take much care in the location of the various pieces of heavy armament. Your adventures would be indeed most hazardous without them. The axes ringing like bells in the forest are a good sign: God willing . . . your ship’s frame and timbers will be sound and strong against the forces of the sea.

Por supuesto! We anticipate your arrival to discuss the new iron works and constructions of very heavy cannons. Our metalúrgico . . . Senhor Dominic De La Armas De Hierro, is occupied with work for his new metal formulas. And you will be happy to know there is an ample supply of your famous Rum along with dancers and entertainers for the occasion. God Speed.

Fortunately the huracán season is finished . . . so you need not fear those hazards. Your voyage should proceed without incident as long as you navigate away from the reef north and east of Habana astilleros. If you are caught there . . . . even frames made with wood from the sabicu tree will not be enough to save your ship and crew. God Forbid!

Siempre tu viejo aliado,
Miguél De Nevado Norte
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