PaperModelers.com

Go Back   PaperModelers.com > > >

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 07-09-2016, 04:21 AM
Dick Dick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 161
Total Downloaded: 7.57 MB
Thank you for another interesting episode of the sailing ships history.
Begroetingen,
Dick
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-09-2016, 06:36 AM
eatcrow2's Avatar
eatcrow2 eatcrow2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Posts: 2,070
Total Downloaded: 494.79 MB
Another jewel in your collection!! Beautiful modeling..
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-10-2016, 07:48 AM
firdajan2's Avatar
firdajan2 firdajan2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 245
Total Downloaded: 0
Hi Ab,

thank you very much for another very interesting build - and for the another lesson in Dutch´s shipbuilding.
I´m waiting for more .

Jan
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-11-2016, 12:40 AM
abhovi's Avatar
abhovi abhovi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Alkmaar, the Netherlands
Posts: 333
Total Downloaded: 48.95 MB
Thank you all for your kind words (although I guess eatcrow2's comment was rightfully meant for Tomek's model). I am going through a bit of a building dip at the moment, but new plans begin to take shape. It all takes some time at my age...
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-03-2016, 11:55 AM
abhovi's Avatar
abhovi abhovi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Alkmaar, the Netherlands
Posts: 333
Total Downloaded: 48.95 MB
There are some more ship types I programmed to do some time ago, so I will continue with some more small 17th century craft.

The first one is a 'kaag'. It is a flatbottomed clinker built vessel, which is interesting for me, as I never did a clinker built model before. The model is reconstructed after a specification contract in the book by the Amsterdam lord mayor Nicolaes Witsen (1641-1717). The size of this vessel is 42 feet, which means in the 1 : 77 scale I work in, a total length of 17 centimeters.

Like the smalschip (narrow ship) I built before this one, the type was used as a lighter, to bring and take freight to and from bigger ships lying on the roadsteads of the isles of Texel and Terschelling, in order to transport it to Amsterdam. The merchantmen were often too big to cross the shallow waters of the 'Zuyderzee', the inlet of the North Sea Amsterdam is situated at. This is a small kaag. There were bigger ones, approximately the size of the smalschip: up to 70 feet. It was sailed by a skipper and his hand. The rig is a spritsail, like the smalschip.

Building is pretty straightforward. A cardboard skeleton, vertically covered with paper, filler was applied and the hull was sanded and planked with paper strips with a layer of self adhesive imprinted plastic. This time I did not forget to cover the plastic with primer to prevent the paint to peel off.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01868-medium-.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-schermafbeelding-2016-08-03-om-19.43.35.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01878-medium-.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01874-medium-.jpg

See you next time.
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
  #26  
Old 08-04-2016, 01:53 AM
abhovi's Avatar
abhovi abhovi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Alkmaar, the Netherlands
Posts: 333
Total Downloaded: 48.95 MB
Of course I forgot to show the looks of a -kaag-. Hereby the drawing Witsen presents in his book and another one by the painter Ludolf Backhuyzen. Witsen also states measurements from a specification contract for a 42-feet long kaag. Such contracts were written by lawyers as proof of the agreement between a commissioner and a shipbuilder. They are a very important source for reconstruction 17th century ships. The text says:

`Long between stem and stern 47 feet, wide 12 feet 6 inches, depth 4 feet 2 inches: the stem high 9 feet, the top wide 1 foot, rake 5 1/2 feet: the stern high 7 feet 8 inches, rakes 3 feet, inside thick 7 inches, outside 5 inches, the top wide 1 foot, the bottom wide 8 foot 5 1/2 inches, thick 4 inches, the floors thick 3 1/2 inches, one foot between them, the futtocks wide 1 foot, thick 4, wide 5 inches.` and so on.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan-1.jpeg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan-kopie.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-04-2016, 03:29 AM
Seahorse's Avatar
Seahorse Seahorse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Nisko
Posts: 121
Total Downloaded: 0
It's going to be another beautiful sailing ship:-)

Tomek
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-04-2016, 06:48 AM
eatcrow2's Avatar
eatcrow2 eatcrow2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Posts: 2,070
Total Downloaded: 494.79 MB
Looking forward to following this!! Love your choices of subjects..
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08-08-2016, 03:58 AM
abhovi's Avatar
abhovi abhovi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Alkmaar, the Netherlands
Posts: 333
Total Downloaded: 48.95 MB
I have not been quite complete in describing the purpose of the kaag. Indeed it was a freighter, but a very special one. As easily can be seen, comparing it with the smalschip I described earlier in this thread, the kaag’s loading capacity was much less than the smalschip’s. Therefore the vessel was especially used for the transport of people. Sailors who had signed for a trip on board of a large vessel, lying off the coast of Texel and Terschelling, were brought there (and after having survived taken back to Amsterdam) by kaags.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan.jpg
Etching by Jan Porcellis

Moreover there was a most effective public transport in Holland in the 17th century, which connected the cities by using water as a highway. Almost every two hours (even at night) kaags left from special quaysides to every city in the province, from where other ships took over to reach locations further on. Depending on the sort of water they sailed, the types differed from simple tow barges, which were towed by a horse, to sailing kaags for crossing lakes and even to narrow and wide ships for crossing the Zuiderzee, thus connecting Holland to Frisia and Groningen up north.
The ferry kaags were slightly adapted by using canvas as covers for the hold, in which people sheltered from the wind and the rain, and a slightly more raking stempost.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan-2.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan-1.jpg
Etchings by Reinier Nooms

The model has progressed up to the point where the rigging starts. The steersman’s stand is lowered beneath deck height as a result of the small dimensions of the vessel. There is a tiny compartment for the crew just behind the covered hold and luggage could be stored beneath the hatch in the fore deck.
The rigging was a spritsail with a staysail in front, like the smalschip.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01880.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01883.jpg
The model so far.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01879.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01881.jpganother 17th century Dutch workhorse-dsc01882.jpg
The kaag together with other vessels in the same scale. The smalschip is much bigger. The ship in the background is an 18th century 150 feet long East Indiaman. We can really compare sizes now and see the logic of working in the same scale
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08-08-2016, 08:27 AM
tatasam's Avatar
tatasam tatasam is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Poland
Posts: 1,309
Total Downloaded: 81.41 MB
Thumbs up

Beautiful modeling !

Henryk
Reply With Quote
Login to remove ads
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 8.70%
Parts of this site powered by vBulletin Mods & Addons from DragonByte Technologies Ltd. (Details)
Copyright © 2007-17, Paper Modelers.com