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  #111  
Old 07-16-2017, 03:13 PM
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Again Michael this has come out really nice....!
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The SD40 is 51 now (phew) !!!!!!! (We are all getting older by the day!).
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  #112  
Old 07-16-2017, 05:39 PM
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Ab, now that I've finally connected your screen name to your full name, I'll be digging through your build logs here! I enjoyed your Journal article very much. Also, I guess Paul Fontenoy does a lot of work with you as he's always mentioning you when I talk to him.

Very inspiring work!

Clare
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  #113  
Old 07-17-2017, 03:36 AM
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Thank you Michael and Kevin WS.
Catopower: I looked at your site. Fabulous. You will be a great name on this forum.
When you see Paul again, say hello. He was to show me around in America during the last Guild Meeting for which I was invited to speak, but I was not abled not come because of problems with my spine. Maybe another time...
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  #114  
Old 07-17-2017, 07:27 AM
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I'm glad to know about your site, Clare, and have bookmarked it.

Don
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  #115  
Old 10-09-2017, 08:07 AM
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It has been a while since my last post on this subject, but finally my son found the time to make new pictures. They go hereby. In the mean time I spent my days making a Statenjacht, about which I will report in another thread, and I am still struggling with the build of a herring buys. Not that it is a hard model to make, but there are some nasty questions I could not answer for a long time, but finally I think I have found proof for part of the answer.
Anyway, here is the hooker, drying its sails on a summer evening somewhere in one of the inlets of the Holland or Zeeland coast.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_2_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_7_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_11_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_14_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_21_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_34_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_36_lr.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-9.hoeker_de_zeilen_drogende.jpg
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another 17th century Dutch workhorse-hoeker_33_lr.jpg  
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  #116  
Old 10-09-2017, 09:36 AM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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It is a beautiful model of that blunt-bowed workhorse, and the image of the vessel drying its sails offshore is absolutely wonderful.

Don
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  #117  
Old 10-09-2017, 09:55 AM
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Amazing!

Tomek
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  #118  
Old 11-26-2017, 06:12 AM
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abhovi abhovi is offline
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It has been a while since I last contributed to this site but Seahorses beautiful posts reminded me of it. The reason for not posting for a while is simple: the project I was working on was not making any real progress.

My subject this time, after the fisherman type -the hooker- was the other iconic Dutch fishing boat of the 17th century: the herring buss. It was a relatively small vessel (this one is 72 feet long) and I used an original 18th century lines plan.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-vg7898-kopie.jpg

It is possible to use it because the difference in hull shapes between the 17th and 18th busses can be ignored. Herring was one of the most important ingredients in the Dutch kitchen in those days and there must have been thousands of busses, to satisfy the market. Herring was also an important exportproduct.

I started this project in a rather ignorant way, not expecting any problems. In the beginning that seemed the right prediction, because the building of the hull offered no problems. The technique was the same as in the other projects I published here. The main problem however appeared to be the rigging.

First something about the method of fishing. To catch herring a long series of straight nets were hung in the water, like a long curtain. The idea was that small fish passed through the loop-holes, but the bigger ones got stuck and could not free themselves because of its gills.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-800px-heringsfleet-1-.jpg

Once the ship arrived at the fishing grounds somewhere on the North Sea two of its three masts were lowered and placed in gaffs on the railings to make room for the job on deck. Only the aft mast stayed upright and provided the necessary pull to keep the nets tight. This stage was even depicted on a Delfts tile.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-de-nederlandse-haringvloot-schilderij-van-cornelis-beelt-1640-1702.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan.jpg

When the nets were pulled back in with the help of the capstan one man in front took in the rope with its floaters, while others at a roll in the bulwark grabbed the nets. The fish was removed from the net with a quick move, like one does with the blankets when making a bed. The fish was cured and stowed in small barrels with a lot of salt.
Because all this work was done on deck it was necessary to remove the two masts. And that was one of my problems: how did they do it? How did they manage to get two heavy masts out of their steps in the hold and place them in their gaffs on deck of a small moving ship? The masts must have weighed hundreds of kilos. From what I heard it must have been a risky exercise because people got killed doing it. Probably therefore the rig of the buss changed to the one like of the hooker in the 18th century. Literature did not help me out.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-scan-kopie-2.jpg

It took me long to figure out how the job was done. An etching by Reinier Nooms helped me out.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-schermafbeelding-2017-11-12-om-14.34.28.jpg

First the main mast was lowered therefore a plank in the deck was removed, so that the foot of the mast appeared on deck level. With tackles on the fore mast and the yard the foot was lifted and placed in its gaff. Then the foremast was lowered. It tilted above deck level, as can be seen on Nooms's etching.

Is that important for a model? Yes, because without this knowledge the arrangement of the deck could not be made. It is my firm conviction that no other method of research old ships works better than modelmaking and paper is a quick and easy material to do it.
However, the deck was only one of my many problems. How about the rigging? How did they remove all those ropes before they could even think of storing the masts? That was the point where I got stuck so I turned to other projects, but from its place on the shelf the model kept looking at me in a reproachable way.

First I could not decide in which stage I wanted to depict the ship: on its way to the fishing grounds or while actually fishing. These two stages showed two completely different looking ships. In the end I decided to do the sailing variant, for which I had some good examples, drawn by a 17th century artist Van der Laan. I needed those, because the rigging of this ships differed so much from what we usually see on three-masted ships that every bit of progress was the result of a long period of doubt.
Here you can see some examples of how the ship looked while sailing and how I translated that into the rigging of the model.

another 17th century Dutch workhorse-rp-p-1912-369.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-bi-1915-0107-10.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-schermafbeelding-2017-07-27-om-07.35.35.jpg
another 17th century Dutch workhorse-48ddb745-1e71-4666-ba9a-e262c8b84602.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-2a900c4d-49c7-4425-bde8-4706b4df6224.jpganother 17th century Dutch workhorse-29c12db2-d7df-4e3a-aa74-e8d5585746a6.jpg another 17th century Dutch workhorse-2ff2b0a4-0790-46a0-8675-8405711c264c.jpg

I promise to send better pictures when the model is finished, perhaps with a new Photo-Painting by my son.
I know this is not a maritime site, so I apologize for my long and dreary story, but at least I use paper to do my research, so please be tolerant and allow me this impertinance.

By the way, Doris, queen of the ship section of this forum, where art thou?
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  #119  
Old 11-26-2017, 06:53 AM
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Outstanding!!
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  #120  
Old 11-26-2017, 10:40 AM
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No apology needed. This is what always makes your posts so interesting...the research and how-to.

As usual, another great model in the making.

Fred
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