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  #101  
Old 09-03-2018, 05:49 PM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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The rigging and the chain work looks real nice.
I never realized chain was used as rigging.
Mike
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  #102  
Old 09-04-2018, 05:47 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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Thanks Mike.
I don't know when cheap manufactured chain became available, maybe around the civil war.
The Charles Morgan (1830) has chain on the spanker gaff but who knows if she was
built that way, she has been modified a lot.
Many of the clippers had chain topsail and top-gallant sheets.
The Conrad (1880) has wire rope for most of the standing rigging.
It seems that wire rope replaced chain around the 1890-1900 period.
Lighter, stronger and easier to work with I guess.
cheers Jim
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  #103  
Old 09-07-2018, 07:46 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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Scratch modeling is interesting, you come up with seemingly impossible situations.
Moving on to the foremast. The top is made mostly from steel angle, which means it is very spindly.
It would be way too flexible to rig if made from paper and wood wouldn't look right.
See photos 1-3. I copied them from Andersons "Masting and Rigging" book.
I hope I haven't violated any copyrights.


My conclusion is that the metal parts have to be made out of metal.
Photo 4 is a CAD drawing I made of the fore, main and mizzen tops.
The outer arcs will be wood, the rest open. I got some 0.005 and 0.010 brass sheets.
This brass can be cut with scissors so this is almost like paper modeling.


The last 3 pics are my first attempt. The bent metal angles are flat brass glued together,
top bottom and edge. The central wood will be mostly cut away.
Thats all for tonight. cheers Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1644.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1645.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1646.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1647.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1648.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1649.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1651.jpg  
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  #104  
Old 09-13-2018, 12:46 PM
elliott elliott is offline
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Hi Jim. Looks like you have stumbled in to a potential bee's nest. Is bending the metal giving you problems? If I read correctly, the masts themselves were made out of angle iron? If you are anticipating makng long straight folds in metal to duplicate this, might I suggest using a modeler's metal brake to do the folding. Don't know offhand where to get one - MicroMark springs to mind of course as does Model Shipways. Other than that I imagine that Google is your friend. I do think you are on the right track though.
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  #105  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:43 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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hi Elliott,
I guess I wasn't clear. I meant that metal parts that would look ugly in other than metal
have to be made of metal. The mast for instance is a rolled cylinder presumable riveted
or maybe welded. I am happy to make it out of a dowel.


The top is mostly made out of metal angle. I have been using 0.005 and 0.010 thick
brass which bends easily and can be cut with scissors. A friendly material, like paper.
Also I bought some 1/32" angle which is 3" on scale, used under the top.


The mast head is shown before and after painting. The test piece dowel models the
top mast for fitting. I am pretty sure that the Conrad has timber above the lower masts.
The 5 small holes in the top are fair-leads for ropes.

cheers Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1652.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1653.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1654.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1655.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1656.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1657.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1658.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1659.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1660.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1661.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1662.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1663.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1664.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1666.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1667.jpg  

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  #106  
Old 09-14-2018, 12:34 AM
elliott elliott is offline
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No, you were clear Jim; I misunderstood. The pictures you supplied made your meaning clear. I think your mast work is going to look super.
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  #107  
Old 09-14-2018, 08:20 AM
RdK RdK is offline
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Hi Jim!

That is a very beautiful model and it is interesting to see how you solve the little details. I look forward to seeing more of this! It reminds me a bit of the sail ships anchored here in Helsinki, although most are smaller and wooden. One day I will make a tour to picture, plan and build one of these from scratch myself .

-Radek
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  #108  
Old 09-15-2018, 08:48 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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thanks Elliott and RDK.
Here is the almost completed mast with/without the topmast dowel.
It still lacks some blocks for the running rigging and an anchor for the chain supporting
the fore yard. These can wait.
cheers Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1668.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1669.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1670.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1672.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1674.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1675.jpg  
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  #109  
Old Yesterday, 08:25 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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hi friends,
The foremast is essentially complete. The upper top came out better than I expected.
It is built more or less the same as a real late 1880's ship, that is out of metal.
The metal channel can be bought in 1/32 inch size and scales to 3 inch.
The fore mast and fore topmast caps are made from sheet brass in 0.010 and 0.005
thickness. Both can be cut with scissors much like paper. The rest is wire.
I still have to add the topgallant and top shrouds.
cheers Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1682.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1681.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1680.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1679.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1678.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1677.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1676.jpg  
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  #110  
Old Yesterday, 10:26 PM
elliott elliott is offline
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Nice pics and very nice work there Jim. By the time you finish the ship you'll be a fully qualified metalsmith!
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