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  #121  
Old 12-29-2018, 08:56 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Fine details Jim.
I am always learning something from sail ship builders.
All that chain in the masts is new to me.
Mike
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  #122  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:41 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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Thanks Mike,
I think that cheaply manufactured chain and wire rope became available sometime after
the American civil war. The Canrad is from 1880 so that stuff was available.
Most ship models are of ships from previous eras so they have hemp rope.
cheers Jim
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  #123  
Old 01-01-2019, 07:40 PM
John Wagenseil John Wagenseil is offline
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Some bomb ketchs and gun boats from the earlier sail period had chain stays where rope stays would have been damaged by the muzzle blast.
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  #124  
Old 01-02-2019, 07:24 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Wagenseil View Post
Some bomb ketchs and gun boats from the earlier sail period had chain stays where rope stays would have been damaged by the muzzle blast.
Interesting. That sounds very practical. I bet the chain was blacksmith hammered though.


In Underhills book he explains that square sail sheets are bent over a pulley and wire
rope will fail because the strands are bent and the sail will move the rope slightly
causing the strands to fail. Like bending a paper clip until it fails.

Chain works here because it is more flexible, IE nothing is in bending.
So chain was used instead of wire rope when they both became cheaply available.
cheers Jim
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  #125  
Old 01-10-2019, 09:20 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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hi all,
Some progress on the Conrad.
Four out of 5 of the foremast stays are in and the jib halyards and down-hauls in place.
The outermost stay does not have a jib on it.
The down-haul and the halyard lines go to the same belaying pin.
It is possible that these 2 lines could be the same rope, pull one and release the other.
Somehow I changed the font. Don't know how. Oh well.
It may appear that there is an extra block on the mast in each halyard.
This block is needed to direct the line to behind the yard so it doesn't foul the sail.
This pretty well clears up the foremast so the mainmast is next.
cheers Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1725.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1726.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1727.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1728.jpg   Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1729.jpg  

Museum ship Joseph Conrad 1:96 scratch build-dscf1730.jpg  
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  #126  
Old 01-11-2019, 09:01 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Those first two images put the hard work on display.
That is beautiful detailed rigging work on the bow mast.
Mike
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  #127  
Old 01-11-2019, 09:19 PM
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birder birder is offline
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Nice work on the rigging! You are doing a fine job on those lines and blocks. Very cool.
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regards Glen
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  #128  
Old 01-13-2019, 04:26 PM
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jimbean jimbean is offline
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Thanks Mike and Glen
The rigging is the best part for me, even though there is a lot of fiddly detail.
cheers Jim
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