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  #11  
Old 06-24-2020, 04:28 PM
gregbal gregbal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumb Dog View Post
For those interesting in more discussion and photographs for the steam powered model above, see: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/mode...ed-t60539.html

The discussion also includes another photo of a second large build, showing a very different hull form.

Best of luck,

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
I appreciate your linking to the Tapatalk discussion! Though I mentioned it a couple times, it completely slipped my mind to put in a link.
Cheers 🍻
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  #12  
Old 06-25-2020, 04:47 AM
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SmashedGlass SmashedGlass is offline
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This looks very interesting *grabs bag of popcorn and takes a seat*
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  #13  
Old 06-29-2020, 12:09 PM
gregbal gregbal is offline
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First, I'd like to publicly acknowledge a hearty debt of gratitude to the fellow forum-member [not sure whether or not he wishes to be identified] for graciously sending me a copy of the Marine Modelling International article which I'd been searching for. Turns out the 'R. Lefevre,' who I cited as the architect of the plan views I found, was Ren Lefvre, a noted (and obviously very accomplished) European model-builder who scratch-built the subject model as well as writing the article itself. That model -- a 1/12.5 scale remote control craft which is actually steam-powered by a tiny double boiler, like the original -- is the incredible inspiration for my own rather pallid build.

Having the well-illustrated article at hand allowed me to re-tool several errors already committed, and will no doubt head off a host of others. My warm thanks to the generous soul who kindly passed it along.

I doff my horned Viking helmet to you, sir.

Back to the build....

Since the cabin areas are an integral part of the structure I'm working up, it seemed prudent (and at the same time more fun) to finish and install them before final framework construction, to make sure everything ends up as straight and well-aligned as possible. In addition to the forward well area already shown above, I finished the similarly-appointed (but trickier-shaped) aft one, and attached it to its forward frame. (The rear still 'floats' for any necessary adjustments after hull-skinning and decking.)



Next up was the oval bridge cupola. For the phone-booth-sized cupola itself, I drew up and printed a simple line-outline shape (based on my 'scaled' plan-views) to test the spacing and fit. It turned out about 95%. The second version got color and some texturing and rivet details.



The slightly domed roof was -- somewhat shockingly -- right the first time around.



And the finished basic structure...standing next to its pale prototype...with assorted details yet to be applied.



And the more-or less finished article, test-slid into place on the frame. Note that the large slot and side gouges will be covered over by upper works later on.







A side note, on the color.
Models, illustrations and period-paintings show a rather wide range of hues for the 'naval buff' so-favored by late-19th and early 20th Century navies and vessels. I selected a more tan-shaded color sample online that looked best to me, and used it as the basis for my own 'artwork' while creating my parts.
When it came time for printing, however, my sturdy old HP printer balked...and coughed up a much pinker tone. Despite ongoing (and occasionally rather technically-inventive) 'discussions,' the printer refused to budge. In the end, I decided -- since it's theoretically a 'test-build' anyway -- what the heck...it was 'close enough.'
Then it turned out (no big surprise, really) that the machine is probably smarter than I am. The pinkish-tone 'buff' it settled on turns out to be essentially the exact hue of Testors' old 'square bottle' 1170 Light Tan model enamel...a rather misbegotten pinkish-tan color not much good for anything else...but making the always-necessary touch-ups and painting of odds and ends a much simpler affair than it otherwise might have been, with what is traditionally a rather-notoriously difficult-to-match color range.
I stand corrected.
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  #14  
Old 06-29-2020, 12:50 PM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Nice work with the oval bridge cupola.
That is a tough assembly to do in paper/card.
It has a "Jules Verne" appearance to it.
It contributes a lot to the character of this wonderful old torpedo boat.
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  #15  
Old 06-29-2020, 02:49 PM
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southwestforests southwestforests is offline
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That's a neat looking boat.
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Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere, not detail.
later, F Scott W
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  #16  
Old 06-29-2020, 06:33 PM
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southwestforests southwestforests is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbal View Post
A side note, on the color.
Models, illustrations and period-paintings show a rather wide range of hues for the 'naval buff' so-favored by late-19th and early 20th Century navies and vessels. I selected a more tan-shaded color sample online that looked best to me, and used it as the basis for my own 'artwork' while creating my parts.
When it came time for printing, however, my sturdy old HP printer balked...and coughed up a much pinker tone. Despite ongoing (and occasionally rather technically-inventive) 'discussions,' the printer refused to budge. In the end, I decided -- since it's theoretically a 'test-build' anyway -- what the heck...it was 'close enough.'
Then it turned out (no big surprise, really) that the machine is probably smarter than I am. The pinkish-tone 'buff' it settled on turns out to be essentially the exact hue of Testors' old 'square bottle' 1170 Light Tan model enamel...a rather misbegotten pinkish-tan color not much good for anything else...but making the always-necessary touch-ups and painting of odds and ends a much simpler affair than it otherwise might have been, with what is traditionally a rather-notoriously difficult-to-match color range.
Oh that's funny!
Never underestimate the potential for entertaining ironies within the hobby!

Oh, and,
All Hail The Mighty Quarterfloz!

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Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere, not detail.
later, F Scott W
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  #17  
Old 06-30-2020, 05:21 AM
PAPER FAN PAPER FAN is offline
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Wow, stroke of luck on the color match. I find even "correct" colors don't match that well. Boat is going to be as amazing as unique when done.
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  #18  
Old 07-03-2020, 04:08 AM
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JP64 JP64 is offline
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Because I've built 2 models of USS Maine, I'm following this thread about this little "wasp" with high interest and curiosity.

Your model is becoming a very well done building, indeed..

Have a nice modeling !

ciao
Jp
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  #19  
Old 07-03-2020, 08:08 AM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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This is such a good-looking craft, the turn-of-the-last century era was so interesting for marine architecture, your construction is so well done, and the conversation is so interesting, that this has become one of my favorite threads.

Don
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  #20  
Old 07-03-2020, 10:10 AM
gregbal gregbal is offline
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Thanks Don and JP for your words of encouragement!

After much puzzling as to the best way to proceed, I've started a cautious approach to hull skinning. Though I'm reasonably sure I'll be able to use single larger pieces for the more gentle compound curve areas of the hull -- in fact I've laid out and test-fitted a band that is about 3/4 of the length of the uppermost hull sides -- it seems clear that the stern architecture will be the 'make or break' test for build 1.0.

Starting with the lowest point on the stern, and meaning to work forward and upward, I'm starting with plain-paper templates for small plating sections, then transferring those lines to 65 lb white stock for the actual parts. I've also added some extra bracing here and there to stiffen the frame, and added 'bumpers' to the thin rib sections at the most dramatic curve-transition areas to try to minimize rib show-through.
Once laid out, the plating sections receive subtle (I hope) plating detail with black ink, then get 'rolled' against a foam pad along every axis with a dowel to impart some three-dimensional curve potential.



Adhesive is regular Tacky-Glue for working time, 'quick-tacked' where necessary with CA at critical points.

Here's the first stbd. section on, with the next section waiting to go. For the most troublesome curve areas I'm adding extra tabs at anchor-points to slip behind already-attached parts, to give some flex and leverage to help follow those trying shapes.



The ship's drawings I'm working with show a small projecting keel, which I intend to detail-out afterward, integral with the crescent-shaped rear frame supporting the rudder. It seemed the easiest way to handle things.
I've also printed and laminated the rear deck section after fiddling with templates to check fit against the camber and such. It seemed having that rear deck section in place would be helpful to build and shape the aft-most stern area against for the proper contours. We'll see.

Thanks again to all for your interest and support.
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