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Old 01-01-2021, 06:54 PM
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How do I make 1/200 scale ship railings?

About 10 years ago, I used sewing thread to make ship railings in 1/200 scale.
I want to repeat that process, but I can't recall how I did it and everything I have tried recently ends up in a mess.

Can anyone point me to a tutorial or build thread that would have the answer?
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Old 01-01-2021, 07:00 PM
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Found this, it is on a paper ship which is larger than 1/200.
Part VIII: Building V108 - Miscellaneous Bits - Card and Paper Models - Model Ship World™
Quote:
... unless you want to replace the printed railing (41c) with thread railing. I use quilting thread for making thread railings; it has a nice diameter and is far more fuzz-free than ordinary sewing thread. This particular railing will be more than the usual degree of difficulty, because the railing is actually part of a conic section. Use the printed railing as a template and cover it with wax paper. Stiffen the thread somewhat by running it through your fingers with a bit of PVA glue. While the thread still has some tack, you can stick it down onto the wax paper covered template. The wax paper will prevent the stick from being permanent. Start by laying down the curved railings and then glue on some short pieces of straight thread for the stanchions. Let this dry thoroughly before removing the railing from the wax paper. Paint the railing gray - spray gray primer works great. This PVA-glued railing will not be as stiff as the CA-stiffened railings we'll make later, so it can be formed into the necessary conic section shape before gluing it to the platform. I think it's a good idea to be consistent on how you mount your railings; I mount mine with the stanchions inboard. It's a minor detail, but one that might drive you to distraction if you later discover you have some stanchions inboard, but others outboard.
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Old 01-01-2021, 07:20 PM
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Here's the description from later in that same thread

Start by downloading the free railings template at Paper Shipwright. You'll have to go through the whole checkout procedure, but relax - you don't get charged anything for the transaction. The Paper Shipwright template is in 1/250 scale, so you'll need to scale it up for 1/200 by printing at 125% of the original. At that size, you won't be able to print the template on one sheet of paper. What you do absolutely need is both ends of the template; I managed this by printing two copies of the template in landscape mode.

Next you'll need to glue the templates onto some heavy-duty cardboard. I found that a case for liquid fabric softener worked well -- it's very rigid, because of course liquids are heavy. Use spray adhesive to glue down the templates. In this picture you can see that I've spliced the two landscape-mode copies together to make a single template. There's also a thread ladder template, which I won't be demonstrating, but which works in principle exactly like the railings template.

You're now ready to start wrapping thread. I use quilting thread, but regular thread will also work.

The template works like this: At each end are tic marks labelled two rail, three rail, and four rail. These are the marks you will use to align the railing threads. Notice that the two-rail marks actually consist of three marks - the bottom 'rail' is actually used to mount the railing to the model and doesn't count as one of the real-life rails.

On opposite sides of the template are drawn railings with the stanchions spaced at different intervals. The smallest interval is about 5.5 mm. The stanchion locator marks on the model are 6 mm apart. I don't know about you, but I'm not going to nit-pick over 0.5 mm, so I used the 5.5 mm spacing.

Start by wrapping the rails first. Use some tape to secure the thread right on top of the tic marks. Go ahead and use all four sets of two-rail marks - you'll get four lengths of railing as a result.

When the rails are done, cut the thread and secure the end with tape, taking care to ensure the thread stays taut and properly positioned. Next, add the stanchions in the same fashion. You have to kind of train yourself to concentrate only on the stanchion interval you want to use, otherwise you wind up with irregularly spaced stanchions. You can cut off the other stanchion spacing guides if you find them too distracting.

When all the rails and stanchions are wound, it's time to secure the joints by giving the entire railing set a coat of diluted white PVA glue. You can also try medium-cure CA, which will make the railings stiffer. I didn't use CA this time around because my bottle of medium-cure is on the old side and is more like medium-slow, which is too viscous for this job. Before brushing on the glue, I find it helpful to add some tension to the railings by sliding a piece of dowel or strip wood under the rail threads at either end of the template; this will push the rails up and against the stanchions. After the glue dries thoroughly, you can paint the railings in any manner you choose. I use gray spray primer. One thing to take note of here is that any thread will have some fuzz on it. Quilting thread has less fuzz, but it still has it. Spray painting causes build-up on the fuzz, and too many coats can make this build-up unsightly. It helps to pick off as much of the fuzz as you can before and/or after painting.

When the paint is dry, you can remove the finished railings from the template. At this scale and template length, I got about four feet of railing, which should be more than enough to do the model, even if I mess up on some and have to try again.
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Old 01-01-2021, 07:31 PM
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Reducing fuzz on the threads

C Coyle mentions using a bit of glue to settle the fuzz. I have always beeswax with good results. It reduces the fuzz and stiffens the thread a bit. A lot of wooden ship modelers swear by it for rigging.

Micromark sells a set of three 1-oz bars of beeswax for $8.95. One ounce is about the size of a pack of chewing gum, and it will last almost forever.
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Old 01-01-2021, 08:23 PM
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Thank you!
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Old 01-01-2021, 08:54 PM
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Welcome! I won't be having any paper models to contribute, but, hey, at least I can sometimes find things for people.
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Old 01-02-2021, 11:01 AM
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Why not use the many sorts of PE sets for railing ???
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Old 01-02-2021, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnMGD View Post
Why not use the many sorts of PE sets for railing ???
I have a few, and will use them until they run out. I also have some laser-cut sets, mostly ladders and steps, plus some detail sets for specific ships (Prince of Wales, Hornet, Yamato).

But the cost of photo-etch sets from US sellers is high, up to US$70 for a set of simple PE railings. The cost is even higher for 1/100 scale railings because there are fewer railings per set. PE sets from Europe may be priced lower,(depending on the exchange rate, but they can take 2 or 3 months to get here, and the shipping costs are high.

I will use PE and laser-cut details when I can get them and when I can afford them, but it makes sense to me to make my own ordinary railings. And with railings made from thread, I can use ordinary craft glue to mount them, so I don't risk gluing my fingers permanently to my workbench.
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Old 01-04-2021, 08:27 AM
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There’s this: Templates for Railings – Paper Shipwright
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Old 01-04-2021, 12:09 PM
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several of the european model companies sell railings either model specific or generic , take a look at JSC or HMV pages
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