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  #11  
Old 03-26-2021, 06:29 AM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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I'm always glad to look behind the scenes at your construction methodologies, Lex.

Don
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  #12  
Old 03-26-2021, 06:30 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Hello Lex,
It is always interesting to read your description of your hull building technique.
One of the things I like about being a member of a forum like this, is observing the variety of methods builders use. Most are unique, as yours seems to be. I agree with your statement: “I think I can argue that balsa is unprocessed paper... right?”
When I cannot complete something with paper or card, wood is my backup material. After all, paper is made from wood. I like your double hull method. I also build double hulls . . . using card for the first layer . . . and paper for the second. Then (normally) paint.
Anyway, great to see all your photos. Excellent work.
Mike
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  #13  
Old 03-26-2021, 08:11 AM
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Thanks for following this build. There are indeed people who build top quality ships straight from the kit without any modifications, I am actually visiting a friend who did exactly this next week. I hope to learn something from there.

About adhesive paper, yes it is a makeshift thing, I just don't like to glue over large areas. It is not the strongest, but it is not any easier to delaminate than the white card ('cotton card'?) I used for the inner hull itself. I guess it also depends on the exact kind of sticky label paper one uses.

Material-wise, even our competition organisers said they hated the C7 rules, but we still used that for the competition for the lack of a better alternative... I think the general shift in attitude reflected the evolution of society, in particular consumer technology. It used to be that building everything from paper is a thing, a demonstration that you can achieve something that not everyone else had. These days, one can simply walk into a 3D printing service and in a few hours they will have a ship model that's as good if not better than your paper version. The way I see it, the labour part of modelmaking means less and less, and modelmaking is becoming an act of personal expression. In this era it's the message that one want to convey with a build that will set a model apart from another, and this philosophy is making me question how I approach cardmodels. Maybe I, as well as a lot of other cardmodel enthusiasts, am still bound by hidden rules that have since been left behind by the frontiers of modelmaking.

The torpedo tube photos did not attach in the last post. Here's a second attempt
Attached Thumbnails
Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210202_004453.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210206_014716.jpg  
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  #14  
Old 03-26-2021, 08:28 AM
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I need to think about how I present the next part of the build. Many things are built in parallel, few of them complete.

The superstructure can be divided roughly into five sections, these are:

Forward superstructure (bridge / main mast)
Funnel
MG platform
Aft superstructure
Aft mast and crane

One can refer to Foute_Man's ship plan for their rough location. Also, World of Warship's Ibuki model can be viewed in here, a very nice reference

Ibuki - 3D model by maxromash (@max_romash) [2aff298] - Sketchfab

The funnel is almost complete, so I can share the progress in one go. If I am correct, Ibuki had ten boiler rooms. Their funnel is grouped in a 4-2-4 arrangement, the four forward boilers are located directly under the bridge, the bridge is built around the opening on the deck, and the main mast sits across the base of the funnel there. The model unfolds the funnel structure in a very unfriendly way, after multiple complaints by me and the other testbuilder, CV12 decided to modify the design for the published version. I'm stuck with the test version however, and I had to say there are visible issues with my build.

The good news is, the build doesn't stop at the paper part. Japanese funnels have multiple levels of handrails all around it. I used (a lot of) photo-etched handrails to add this level of detail. Each boiler room also has a small steam vent next to the main funnel, these are made with 0.5mm copper wire. Inside each funnel opening, I added layers of paper stripes as rainstops. I managed to find a square grid PE sheet, which made a perfect meshwork on the funnel opening. There is also a ladder along the fore end of the funnel, as well as the accompanying handrail. The construction is spread over almost two months, but right now the funnel is more or less complete.
Attached Thumbnails
Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210203_124916.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210223_203636.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210315_183937.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210326_012627.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210326_012643.jpg  

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  #15  
Old 03-26-2021, 09:15 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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This is a very interesting discussion Lex. Regarding 3D printers: Of course, the model ship that is made by a 3D printer is going to be made of plastic, not paper. So there is a big difference between the two. This is a chance for me to make a minor point about 3D printers in general: They are not really printers. I think the more accurate term for them is “Computer Guided Fabrication Machines/Devices”. It is unfortunate in my opinion that the term “printer” got stuck to them and has become widely used.

I think it is a good idea to make clear to those watching our work, what kind of materials we are using, and how the various parts and assemblies are made (if not handmade). You do an excellent job of that, and I can speak for myself that I always try to keep forum members informed when I don’t use card or paper. Personally, I prefer to be able to make the claim that my work is “handmade”. However, the day may arrive when a Laser Cutter makes it possible for me to extend my paper crafting career out far longer that what otherwise would have been possible.

By the way: Very nice funnels!

Best Regards,
Mike

Last edited by Michael Mash; 03-26-2021 at 09:51 AM. Reason: Revise spelling
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  #16  
Old 03-26-2021, 09:49 AM
PAPER FAN PAPER FAN is offline
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The term printer is because the machines literally print in two dimesional space, over and over. The drivers are all based on traditional printers, at least they started out that way. The computer simply slices the 3D image into layered 2D plots and prints them out.
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  #17  
Old 03-26-2021, 09:50 AM
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Thanks Michael and Paperfan, I'm very interested to keep this discussion going. I am not pointing fingers to 3D printers in particular. (Later I will use 3D printed parts myself :P) The key part of my confusion was, why we make cardmodels at all, if all we are doing is mechanically carrying out work that could be done to more or less the same quality by machines. It is after the same kind of soul-search that plastic models have moved on to exploring weathering and diorama, things that truly make each model unique. I'm wondering whether that day is coming to cardmodels as well.

Back to the model itself. Ibuki retained the standard dual 127mm long-range AA gun on most Japanese ships. These are less than stellar anti-air weapons but Japan was more or less stuck with them. Ibuki had four of these, two on either side of the funnel. In World of Warships, these guns did receive a new type of semi-enclosed turret (barbette?). As to exactly how historical this is, is, well, subject to debate.

The guns are relatively simple. The breech section is simplified, but I added the baskets where the loaders stood. Other details inside the turret are left out - because they don't affect the overall silhouette of the turret. I will take a different approach to details on the smaller calibre weapons, as will be seen later. The barrels are simply 1:350 brass barrels, I'm too bad ad rolling them myself.
Attached Thumbnails
Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210220_102627.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210219_155132.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210219_160236.jpg   Japanese Heavy Cruiser Ibuki 1945 [1:400]-img_20210320_001712.jpg  
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  #18  
Old 03-26-2021, 10:25 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lex View Post
Thanks Michael and Paperfan, I'm very interested to keep this discussion going. I am not pointing fingers to 3D printers in particular. (Later I will use 3D printed parts myself :P) The key part of my confusion was, why we make cardmodels at all, if all we are doing is mechanically carrying out work that could be done to more or less the same quality by machines. It is after the same kind of soul-search that plastic models have moved on to exploring weathering and diorama, things that truly make each model unique. I'm wondering whether that day is coming to cardmodels as well.

Well Lex . . . . . I wonder as well.
I bet each builder here would have a slightly different point of view on the subject.

Early in the 19th century, carpenters were making handmade furniture. Then with the use of machines, companies began to build furniture better, faster and cheaper. So many of the small carpentry shops went out of business. People soon realized all the factory made furniture looked the same. Some craftspeople started a new movement called the “Arts And Crafts” movement. They wanted to keep the old skills of handmade furniture alive, and not let them die out. So the two ways of making furniture existed side-by-side. The mass produced furniture supplied the need for the “utilitarian” objects needed in everyday life. While the handmade furniture supplied the need for objects of “inspiration”. Perhaps this applies to all the areas of arts & crafts (painting, pottery, carpentry, glasswork, etc) as well as to PaperCrafting?
Mike
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  #19  
Old 04-04-2021, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Michael Mash View Post
Well Lex . . . . . I wonder as well.
I bet each builder here would have a slightly different point of view on the subject.

Early in the 19th century, carpenters were making handmade furniture. Then with the use of machines, companies began to build furniture better, faster and cheaper. So many of the small carpentry shops went out of business. People soon realized all the factory made furniture looked the same. Some craftspeople started a new movement called the “Arts And Crafts” movement. They wanted to keep the old skills of handmade furniture alive, and not let them die out. So the two ways of making furniture existed side-by-side. The mass produced furniture supplied the need for the “utilitarian” objects needed in everyday life. While the handmade furniture supplied the need for objects of “inspiration”. Perhaps this applies to all the areas of arts & crafts (painting, pottery, carpentry, glasswork, etc) as well as to PaperCrafting?
Mike
Very interesting thoughts ....
For the original thread: very precise, creative construction! The graceful lines of the ship are very nicely reproduced by the model. And the modeling work is impeccable.
To the other thread: Really Mike, as many modelers, so many opinions.. I personally do not oppose other materials when necessary for the end result. Mike makes a railing out of paper, I can only make it out of thread. Others buy the etched set ... For me, creativity and inspiration are always ahead of precise construction.I always want to add something to the model that will make it unique.

Sorry for the bad English, I hope the point is clear.

Regards, Joe
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  #20  
Old 04-04-2021, 03:10 PM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Hello Joe,
A fordító nagyon jól működik.
(The translator works very well)
Mike
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