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Old 02-20-2010, 05:15 AM
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MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild

Well, as I was saying before we were so rudely interupted by some malicious software bug, I am building the Dutch tropical liner mv Oranje, 1938, for the Amsterdam-Djakarta (Batavia before 1949) run, see two pics how she appeared then. It is a scratchbuild in scale 1 : 180 so the length of the model is 111 cm ( 43 ") .
The bulkheads are now in place, see third pic. The skin for the hull will be more or less in the shape of strips and sheets, as in the original ship, so the bulheads, which give only vertical support, will need to be complemented with horizontal elements, longerons. These will be made of little wooden beams, 2 x 2 mm. I marked out their postions (3 and 4 in lengthwise) see pic 4 and cut out the square slits in the bulkheads with a Dremel hobbymachine, pic 5. When that is done, I can glue the longerons in place.
Next time more.
Ahoy
Attached Thumbnails
MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-oramje-panama-canal.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-oranje-technical-certification-tests-1939.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-bulkheads-overview.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-4-marking-positions-longerons.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-4-fraising-longeron-slits.jpg  

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Old 02-20-2010, 11:14 AM
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I am so glad to see you back with this most wonderful build. As stated before, most excellent work.:DRick
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Old 02-20-2010, 11:57 AM
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Thank you for posting these images. This is a very special build and I am glad to be able to watch it again.

Don
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Old 02-21-2010, 05:31 AM
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Before attaching the longerons, I need to place the aft deck, so that I will have a reference to follow the sheer of the hull as a visible clue for checking the correct postion of the longeron leading to the aft deck.

To represent the teakwooden deck, I am using small wooden strips that my hobbyshop supplies, glue them to paper and then cut out the deck with the planking. See pic 3 for the effect of such a wooden deck (the model here is the ms Tjiwangi, of the Royal Java & China Steamship Company, of 1953. It was the first large passenger ship built in the Netherlands after the WW2).

Pic 1 shows the aft deck planked, sanded smooth and ready for varnishing and attached in place, pic 2. Pics 4 and 5 show the deck in place and with the deckhouse attached. This deckhouse contained the 3rd class lounge and deckspace. On the deck below was a dining hall and accomodations for a total of 150 passengers. After the war, in the 1950s, the 3rd clas was discontinued and the facilities rebuilt for the 2nd class passengers.
Attached Thumbnails
MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-5-aft-deck-planked-being-sanded.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-5-aft-deck-being-glued-pressed-position.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-5-effect-using-small-strips-wood-deckplanking.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-5-aft-deck-3rd-class-varnished-place-ready-deckhouse.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-5-aft-deck-3rd-class-deckhouse-place.jpg  

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Old 02-21-2010, 11:11 AM
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Looks good with the combination of actual wood planking and paper/card.

Those are interesting, sampan-like, lifeboats.

Don
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:55 AM
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So, now is the time to install the longerons. This is mainly a proces "by-the-eye", I hold a longeron beam against the bulkheads in a manner that resembles the correct sheer and when it pleases me, I mark its postion and fraise the bays where the longeron will fit. The pictures 1 to 3 show the effect for the 3 and 4 longerons I have attached. You can almost see the actual shape of the hull already!

So, looking at the hull, it seems to me, that the shape of the stern with the aft deck seems smooth and flowing enough, so it's time to open the bar, in the last pic.

I'll come back later, but first I need to plank the foredeck and lower foredeck (what is the English name for such a deck?)
Attached Thumbnails
MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-6-longerons-place.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-6-longerons-bow.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-6-longerons-aft.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-6-bar-3rd-class-open.jpg  
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Old 02-24-2010, 05:38 AM
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You make good use of the combination of wood, paper, and card.

The first photo really shows the intersting hull shape. I wonder if you would be willing to repost the lost information about the reasons for that hull shape?

Don
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:01 AM
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Don, with regard to the hull shape, the Neth. Steamship Cy (SMN) wanted a three week service one way (AMS-Batavia is around 15 000 km) which translates in a minimum speed of around 16 kts average. With a (future) running mate from the Rotterdam Lloyd ( the later Willem Ruys), this would lead to a 1 1/2 week service to the East Indies. So to build a motorship capable of that average speed, they needed a maximum speed of around 25 or 26 kts. The only way to achieve that for a 20 000 tonner was to install 3 huge Sulzer diesel engines with 12 500 hp. Including the auxilliary diesels, total installed power was 46 500 hp. See pic 1, notice the worker standing to the left side of the one of the auxilliary engines, on the left to get a feeling for the size of these engines.

This meant the hull would be very wide, which is good for stability. However, the fees for the Suez canal were calculated on the basis of the width of the main deck, and this factor together with a wish to avoid inner cabins for this tropical liner, the designers therefore opted to narrow the main deck as much as feasible. This lead to this special inward curving hull.
The max speed of the Oranje proved to be 26,5 kts (49 km/hr!) on test runs, making it the fastest motorship in the world at the time.
So far for the technical backgrounds for today, for the boring work on planking the decks goes on and on, see pic 2. When that is done, I'll be back with more progress.
Where possible, I'll also include some more technical information on this ship, if you forum members are interested in such tid-bits.
Greetings.
Attached Thumbnails
MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-7-sulzer-diesel-engines-oranje.jpg   MV Oranje of the Netherlands Steamship Company in scratchbuild-7-endless-sticking-strips-decks.jpg  
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:31 AM
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Love those big diesels!

Reducing the deck width was a solution tried earlier in the 20th century with the Turret (decked) Ships produced by Doxfords in Sunderland. Thankfully the application to the Oranje is less extreme and more attractive!

David
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Old 02-25-2010, 07:27 AM
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Thanks for reposting this information, along with the photo of the Sulzer Diesel engines and you technique of planking.

It is interesting the way that "non-functional" factors, such as limitation treaties and fees have affected ship design over the years. I am reminded of the shelter deck vessel with "tonnage openings" in the shelter deck so that it would be exempt from being included in the ship's tonnage measurement.

Don
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