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Old 04-13-2012, 03:36 PM
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Advice wanted: how to do riggings on very small ships

Hello,
I am trying to build a replacement bretonnian corsair for the out of print man o' war game. Attached is a picture of where I am in the design.
In the picture the ship to the right is the original playing piece, I need more of them.
The one in the middle is my second attempt and the first one to look presentable.
The one in the left is my latest build (3rd modifications, I have a 4th designed waiting to be built).
I have attached the template for the 2nd and 3rd prototype. The intent of the changes between the 2 is to make the ship easier to assemble as the look of the hull was good. I also improved a bit the painting by using gradients.
The 4th is mostly like the 3rd except that it is in one piece only instead of 3.

Here is my question. I have started as you can see on the left most ship to add some cordage to the ship's front mast. I plan to do it to the rear too but I am wondering what should be the best method. Currently I am tying the thread to the mast and gluing it. Then gluing to the side of the hull. I fear that it will not be strong enough to withstand playing with.
I have thought of 3 other methods:
1) tie the bottom of the thread to a separate piece of card or wood and glue it to the inside of the side of the hull
2) pierce the side of the hull and thread the thread through it (like sawing) and not
3) similar to 2 but pierce bellow the deck and go all the way through the hull and back the other side

Thanks for any other advices you may have as I am new to paper modeling
best regards
Terrinecold
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Advice wanted: how to do riggings on very small ships-img_0367.jpg  
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Last edited by terrinecold; 04-13-2012 at 03:41 PM. Reason: making the topic of the thread clearer
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Old 04-13-2012, 03:52 PM
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How about using eyelets like these? Caldercraft Fittings Brass Etched Eyelet 0.3mm (250), Model Boat Fittings, Model ship fittings

Thread the eylets first then make a small hole in the appropriate bit of your ship and glue the eylet into the hole with superglue. Then tie off the cord to the right length and glue for strength.

Tip. Use a dab of superglue on the end of the thread and let it dry. This makes a stiff end which is easier to thread through the eyelets.

Just a thought.
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Old 04-13-2012, 04:46 PM
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When I rig a WWI plane, or some such aircraft, I use a .004 transparent thread.
I use a small pin or micro drill to make a hole in the wing, then thread it through
and pull it taught, using a gel type CA (super glue) with an accelerator to hold it in place.

The same could be done for your ships. Before assembly of hull make your holes,
then tie/thread the thread through the first hole. After assembly, you can then pull
it towards the mast, glue it there, and then bring it down and insert it into the the
next hole in the hull, securing it there. Then, using a smoldering match/toothpick, or,
what I use, a soldering iron, just barely get close to the thread and it will tighten up.
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sporticus View Post
How about using eyelets like these? Caldercraft Fittings Brass Etched Eyelet 0.3mm (250), Model Boat Fittings, Model ship fittings

Thread the eylets first then make a small hole in the appropriate bit of your ship and glue the eylet into the hole with superglue. Then tie off the cord to the right length and glue for strength.

Tip. Use a dab of superglue on the end of the thread and let it dry. This makes a stiff end which is easier to thread through the eyelets.

Just a thought.
Good idea I'll buy some to try. I need to see them next to the ship to see if they are not too big.
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texman View Post
When I rig a WWI plane, or some such aircraft, I use a .004 transparent thread.
I use a small pin or micro drill to make a hole in the wing, then thread it through
and pull it taught, using a gel type CA (super glue) with an accelerator to hold it in place.

The same could be done for your ships. Before assembly of hull make your holes,
then tie/thread the thread through the first hole. After assembly, you can then pull
it towards the mast, glue it there, and then bring it down and insert it into the the
next hole in the hull, securing it there. Then, using a smoldering match/toothpick, or,
what I use, a soldering iron, just barely get close to the thread and it will tighten up.
That sounds like the idea I had about piercing he hull. It is easier to try than the eyelets (no need to wait for them to arrive). I am not sure bout what you mean when ou say "it will tighten up" what does " it " stands or in this case.
Also what is .004 transparent thread are those meadures in inches?
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Old 04-14-2012, 02:06 AM
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For the .004 thread turns out my wife has some
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Old 04-14-2012, 06:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrinecold View Post
That sounds like the idea I had about piercing he hull. It is easier to try than the eyelets (no need to wait for them to arrive). I am not sure bout what you mean when ou say "it will tighten up" what does " it " stands or in this case.
Also what is .004 transparent thread are those meadures in inches?
It in that case "it" is the transparent thread. When the thread is installed there will probably be some slack in the thread. The heat source mentioned will cause the thread to shrink a little, thereby making it taut. Kind of like what happens to heat shrink tubing for electrical wires. Pay heed to the warning about getting close to the transparent thread. Too close and the thread will be burned through.
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Old 04-14-2012, 06:58 AM
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Thanks for the clarification, I did live for a while in the US but english is not my first language and I got confused.
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:00 AM
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English isn't the first language of anyone in the United States ;-)
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:10 AM
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ok I am almost done with the prototype 3 (the first one with cordage), the only thing left is a flag on the forward mast (the paint on the flagpole is drying). What I did as it was too late to implement the shrinking invisible thread method was to glue a second layer of paper on the hull with the same print so that the thread is now sandwiched in between 2 layers of glued paper. I attached a picture and I wonder what you think of the result.
The hull of prototype 4 is already dry and I will try the shrinking thread on that one. I'll also start on the cordage before attaching the sails which should make things easier hopefully.
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