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  #31  
Old 11-17-2016, 01:31 AM
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adamaia adamaia is offline
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Aluminum/paper models

I have been experimenting with aluminum foil for a while. I used my inkjet printer to print on Reynolds foil, which was glued on regular paper, then allowed to dry before spraying with polyurethane. I like making small models , so I used the FG Mig 15 patterns. A 1/144 scale was produced using the same technique. Just my 5 cents on the subject.
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  #32  
Old 06-10-2017, 06:58 AM
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I continue with the fuselage of the P47 in aluminium, the propellers are in normal paper, I like the result but its requires lot of work
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  #33  
Old 06-10-2017, 09:45 AM
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Great looking build, busoramas!

Enjoying the photos and technique!

Can't wait to see the finished model.

Mike
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  #34  
Old 06-10-2017, 10:59 AM
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Great Progress!

Paul,

Great progress!

You'll find that construction with aluminum is slightly different than plain paper [Ok, a lot different than paper]. As per usual it is in the details. The amount of work is part of the process of hand made 3D detail vs. 2D printing detail. That and the fact that aluminum matches the reflective element of the original improves the estimation of the model in the eye of the viewer. You will develop techniques for applying detail that will make the work flow progress at a much faster rate. That's one of the reasons I've been working on printing on aluminum - it makes it far easier to inscribe surface detail.

I have found, when using pounce wheels to lay rivet detail on aluminum, is to place the flat aluminum on a glass surface. This will produce a fine rivet detail that does not deeply indent the surface of the aluminum. If it is desired for a somewhat deeper detail slipping a piece of printer paper (or vellum) in between the aluminum sheet and the glass will produce a "larger" rivet size.

-Gil
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  #35  
Old 06-18-2017, 04:50 AM
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Gil,
I was thinkg to combine lase cut with aluminium foil, design all parts with CAD an then laser cut them, so they match perfectly and save work.

how is your rivet machine? its a normal hole or dot or as the real concave shape?

regards
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  #36  
Old 06-18-2017, 12:44 PM
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Making Dents in Aluminum

Quote:
Originally Posted by busoramas View Post
Gil,
I was thinkg to combine lase cut with aluminium foil, design all parts with CAD an then laser cut them, so they match perfectly and save work.

how is your rivet machine? its a normal hole or dot or as the real concave shape?

regards
Laser cutting has a definite advantage in building with aluminum. I've been thinking along those lines - offsetting the framework by 0.006 " so that aluminum strips can be laid down on the framework prior to the application of skin panels. The skin is laid down in much the same way as the full scale aircraft. Each panel has to be carefully prepared in advance with all the pertinent detail applied before it is fitted to the framework - tedious? Depends upon how you feel about modeling.

When it comes to riveting tools I have collected the usual assortment(s) - from pounce wheels for sewing to pounce wheels for rivet lines on plastic models and hypodermic needles specially prepared and mounted in pin vises. As you might expect riveting becomes an entire subject category unto itself. Note that not all rivets can be seen on an aircraft at photo distances - but modelers persist in having them there anyway. There might be other ways for representation than "denting" the aluminum..., Needless to say, a variety of sizes is needed for "scribing in" the variations found on a typical subject.

One other aspect of using aluminum on a model is that it can be "formed" into compound curves impossible with paper media. This is another area that needs practice prior to taking on the task. It's not that difficult and after a little practice is quite pleasurable. Take a look at Guillermo Rojas-Bazan's work - he's notably the best known and certainly the most prolific of the "all aluminum model makers". His site is here but is down at the moment. You'll see that you have already mastered some of the techniques he uses in his models. The one thing that you will realize is that he is a master at obtaining detailed and accurate documentation - you can never have too much...,

Best regards,

-Gil

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Old 06-18-2017, 05:28 PM
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As you might expect riveting becomes an entire subject category unto itself. Note that not all rivets can be seen on an aircraft at photo distances - but modelers persist in having them there anyway.

That has drove my crazy for years...MOST RIVETS CAN"T BE SEEN!! I have never understood why modelers insist on making them so BIG, I'm fine with pane lines (but those are overdone a lot) but rivets at 1/33 would be invisible.....just my 2 cents worth.......Rich
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  #38  
Old 06-19-2017, 05:39 AM
JohnGay JohnGay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil View Post
One other aspect of using aluminum on a model is that it can be "formed" into compound curves impossible with paper media. This is another area that needs practice prior to taking on the task. It's not that difficult and after a little practice is quite pleasurable. Take a look at Guillermo Rojas-Bazan's work - he's notably the best known and certainly the most prolific of the "all aluminum model makers". His site is here but is down at the moment. You'll see that you have already mastered some of the techniques he uses in his models. The one thing that you will realize is that he is a master at obtaining detailed and accurate documentation - you can never have too much...,

Best regards,

-Gil
If you have aluminum glued to cardstock, can you soak the paper to get the complex curves that paper alone won't do? The aluminum should hold the form once the paper becomes pliable.
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  #39  
Old 06-19-2017, 10:51 PM
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A Few Dependent Variables...,

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Originally Posted by JohnGay View Post
If you have aluminum glued to cardstock, can you soak the paper to get the complex curves that paper alone won't do? The aluminum should hold the form once the paper becomes pliable.
Depends whether you feel lucky, also the thickness of the aluminum; the thickness of the paper; the paper type; the type of glue used to bond the aluminum to the paper; and whether the paper is treated with a conserving spray. Pucker is the bane of metal plane smiths. Flattened permanent puckers are the mark of a neophyte puckersmith. But even the most naive puckersmith must persevere for the time when flattened puckers with paper are no longer prevalent but persist in compound surfaces rid of their puckerish ways...,

-Gil
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  #40  
Old 06-20-2017, 03:13 PM
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Pucker vs. Thickness...,

Below is a visual of what was meant on the little ramble on pucker - note the puckers at the very edge of the surface. This is kitchen foil that's been treated with an inkjet receptor coating bonded to 65# cardstock.

Kitchen Aluminum Foil on 65# Cardstock


The inkjet receptor coating was self researched and designed but requires a protective coating to be applied. I've come up with a different method for inkjet printing on aluminum but that's for reserved for another post flow.

A thicker foil (0.005") on 100% cotton is shown below. The experiment was a first go at doing an "inside out" forming method.

0.005" Tooling Foil bonded to 100% Cotton Stock


-Gil
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