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Old 03-27-2019, 08:50 AM
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kazik kazik is offline
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Model instructions say to cut "on the line" (in Polish: "po lini")

I recently bought the Kartonowy Arsenał (Haliński) Mitsubishi A6M5a Zero model and the instructions say to cut the pieces out "on the line." Please refer to the image below:


Do they mean that I should cut the parts right down the middle of the outline (dotted line B above) or maybe even on the inside of the line (dotted line A)? Normally I would cut all parts like dotted line C.

I think cutting the parts exactly as intended will have a major effect on how they all fit, so I wanted to reach out to you guys before I started on this model.

Thanks in advance.
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Model instructions say to cut "on the line" (in Polish: "po lini")-gcosqh9.jpg  
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Old 03-27-2019, 08:59 AM
Bob626256 Bob626256 is offline
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Here's what I do, and you might need to experiment. When I read in the instructions to cut something out, I leave to black in the part from the cut line, so in your case I would cut where the black and the silver part are and leave no black. I hope this helps.
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Old 03-27-2019, 09:08 AM
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Try cutting a part using the C method and dry fit it to see how it works out. If it is too big then try trimming the cut line until a good fit is acheived.

It is always easier to take a little more off than to add a little more on.
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Old 03-27-2019, 09:41 AM
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A more experienced modeler once told me to try to cut down the center of the line, and that rule has worked well for me for the most part. Therefore Id say to cut on line B. Now you have one vote for each of the 3 methods, so youre still confused! . You need a tie-breaker.
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Old 03-27-2019, 09:43 AM
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trim to fit, start with C, and walk towards A if needed
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Old 03-27-2019, 09:56 AM
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I agree with Doug on the approach they suggest - start out and then trim in. At least to start off with, this way you will not mess anything up.

You will eventually then be able to figure out the correct position for the cut line.
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Old 03-27-2019, 11:01 AM
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My opinion is to start by cutting right down the middle as show above on line B, that way you can go back and fine tune a little if necessary.

Another thing to consider when cutting long strips that wrap around circles to form cylinders (like tire treads). Cut them longer than the printed image. Only cut them to length after making sure they will wrap the whole way around the part without leaving any gaps. Some times designers don't do such a great job calculating the correct length to use for the circumference of a circle.
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Old 03-27-2019, 11:55 AM
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I think it depends on the part and the other adjacent panel lines. Where the part of the real thing has no panel lines, such as joints across a canopy or fabric covering or where there is no original panel line (like a spinner), you would cut off all the black outline. I think your scan shows rivets, so I would try to match the printed non-cutting panel lines. If the joint is a butt joint, I would cut each part leaving black one half the width of printed panel lines - most of the time the joint would itself would show that much so very little black would be needed. If it is an overlap, like fillets, I would leave black as wide as the adjacent printed non-cutting panel lines.


After all, it is only paper and make sure to make copies so that you can try a couple different ways if you aren't sure. In the end, whatever pleases your eye works the best and have fun .


Regards,
John
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Old 03-27-2019, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob626256 View Post
Here's what I do, and you might need to experiment. When I read in the instructions to cut something out, I leave to black in the part from the cut line, so in your case I would cut where the black and the silver part are and leave no black. I hope this helps.
This is also my approach. If you want your model to look like an actual aircraft, IMO leaving the black lines detracts from that effect. I've found that the difference in circumference on fuselage parts is so small -- a fraction of a millimeter -- I can easily make up for it by careful fitting of the parts.

Just my .02 zlotys.

Les (The Voices of Authority)
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Old 03-29-2019, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCStephens View Post
Another thing to consider when cutting long strips that wrap around circles to form cylinders (like tire treads). Cut them longer than the printed image. Only cut them to length after making sure they will wrap the whole way around the part without leaving any gaps. Some times designers don't do such a great job calculating the correct length to use for the circumference of a circle.
I'll second that... and as others have already mentioned, it's always easier to trim more off than it is to add more on.
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