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  #11  
Old 11-03-2019, 04:28 AM
John Wagenseil John Wagenseil is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCStephens View Post
.............
Rather than using a stylus to "score" Ive found that using a blade to cut lightly thru the top half of the sheet works much better. Just be careful to use a light touch or you will end up cutting the whole way thru.

Sometimes it is easier to just give up on folding a tiny part and instead cut it along the score line, then glue the pieces together at the same angle they would have been if folded.
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  #12  
Old 11-03-2019, 09:25 AM
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Amccombs3 Amccombs3 is offline
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I don’t remember who told me this, but for picking up the tiniest pieces, lick the tip of a toothpick and touch the part. Just enough moisture for it to stick.
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  #13  
Old 01-23-2020, 06:49 PM
RPriddy RPriddy is offline
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Small parts

No matter how careful you fold/cut small parts when you go to fold the paper you are asking the outer face of the part to assume a larger circumference than the inner face. This will frequently cause the paper to delaminate. You don’t notice this on larger pieces because there’s enough microscopic give to the fibres to adjust to the different circumferences.
I have found that sealing the edges of these small parts with a minute amount of PVA can prevent the delamination without changing the dimensions or the texture of the printed face. If you use enamels to colour your exposed edges this often accomplishes the same thing. Sometimes I will elect to do both.
Just a thought on a rainy West Coast afternoon!
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  #14  
Old 01-23-2020, 06:58 PM
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airdave airdave is offline
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I've always had the same thinking...until now.
For something to delaminate, it has to be laminated in the first place.

While something like photo paper is different layers of material laminated together, cardstocks and paper are pulp.
And pulp isn't assembled (as sheets of paper) in layers.
Its a mishmash of threads and fibres and clumps and clots.

The outer "layers" of curved/shaped paper would have to stretch and tear
while the inner "layers" might have to compress,
but it can't delaminate in the common sense of the word.

Hmmmm?
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2020, 04:16 PM
RPriddy RPriddy is offline
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Small Parts

Folding/manipulating small parts can result in the card stock delaminating.
Try sealing the exposed edges first.
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  #16  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:43 PM
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Sakrison Sakrison is offline
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I have a collection of tweezers similar to AirDave's collection. I usually prefer the shorter ones with small tips. For very small parts, I'll hold the part with a clamping tweezer and fold & glue it with an ordinary tweezer.

For scribing parts, I tried several tools and what seems to work best is a T-pin with the head cut off, mounted in a hobby blade handle. I keep the handle as close to horizontal as possible; the goal is to compress the surface of the paper rather than to cut it.

And as noted above, scoring is much easier if you do before you cut out the part.
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  #17  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:51 PM
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Sakrison Sakrison is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gharbad View Post
The tiny pieces is why I'm a bit scared of doing my 1/300 ship models.

I have various kinds but I don't really like most of them. They're either too sharp of a point or too large in general. I would say my tweezers are meant for cosmetics and electronics.
If small parts scare you away, scan or photocopy some parts from a kit and play around with them. With a little practice, you'll get comfortable with them.

Sharp points can be ground down. And check sewing supply stores and departments for a wide variety of tweezers. Clamping tweezers can be found at Micromark or for less money at American Science & Surplus --https://www.sciplus.com/ Get their catalog; it's a hoot and full of useful (and useless) stuff at "fell-off-the-truck" prices.
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  #18  
Old 01-26-2020, 04:11 PM
RPriddy RPriddy is offline
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When I speak of “delaminating”, perhaps a better term is edge separation. All card stock has a grain and scoring/folding with, or against, the grain can affect how the paper edges hold together.
I have recently began to do the majority of my scoring on the reverse side of the parts, and use an Etchmate to actually fold the piece. But on small parts I still seal the edges.
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