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  #111  
Old 09-04-2016, 01:43 AM
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THE DC THE DC is offline
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Great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumb Dog View Post
Hi DC,

I forgot the scan. Here it is.

Thumb Dog


Thanks much! I was just talking to a guy who wants to sell his, after he rotor grounded it, but I just don't have the money or room to work on it. Until that changes, I guess I'll build what you posted!

BTW: Great steam engine kit too! Thanks!
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  #112  
Old 09-07-2016, 10:19 PM
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Beautiful work on the steam engine, the working flywheel and piston crank are wonderful!
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  #113  
Old 09-08-2016, 09:31 AM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Since I first started this thread back in February, I have strayed a bit from the original premise, namely, the propaganda value of paper models produced in Spain during the Spanish Civil War. However, the model up for discussion this week brings propaganda back into focus like a bolt from the blue.

The Heinkel 70, known as the Blitz, or Lightning, first took to the air in December of 1932. Developed as a fast mail plane, it joined a growing air armada of “fast mail planes” that Germany was developing in the early 1930s in direct contravention of the Treaty of Versailles. Air-minded observers of the time were not surprised when these mail planes suddenly switched their cargo and began delivering bombs to a terrorized Europe.

The aptly-named Blitz set eight speed-over-distance records in the early 30s, and early production models were quickly converted to carrying passengers. Operated by Luft Hansa, the single engine aircraft carried four passengers in the cramped fuselage, while the crew of two, a pilot and radio operator, worked under their enclosing canopy.

It wasn’t long before the Blitz was seen in Spanish skies, where it served as a reconnaissance aircraft and light bomber with the famed Condor Legion. Germany supplied pilots, mechanics, planes and materiel to the Nationalist forces with two purposes in mind. Firstly, by aiding the fascist Nationalists in their final victory, they eliminated a communist Spain as a possible threat during the coming Continental War. And secondly, the Spanish Civil War gave the Germans a tremendous opportunity to sharpen and hone their Luftwaffe for the planned invasions to come.

Published by Ediciones Uriarte and drawn by our friend PSF, Perdo Sabidon Feliu, the paper model is known as the Avion de Bombardeo, and does not mention its Heinkel heritage. Printed on two sheets of paper, the hand-drawn parts build into a rather strange addition to my collection. It’s obvious that the model represents a Heinkel Blitz, but there are few design cues that are carried over from the original aircraft. The Blitz’s elliptical wing is gone, and replaced by a more easily constructed wing with straight leading and trailing edges. The model’s fin dismisses the characteristic Heinkel curve, and again, makes due with a straight line. The prototype's rounded fuselage is replicated as a tapering octagon. And strangely, the model comes equipped with fixed, spatted, landing gear, something the fast Heinkel 70 never had. Finally, there are two passenger windows found on either side of the fuselage, but as will be seen, this model does not represent an airliner.

When the plane is turned over, we see the real purpose of the aircraft, it is indeed a bomber. The holes found under the fuselage are the exit points for the bombs that now fill the passenger compartment. And as you’ve already noticed, the underside of the broad wing is the most graphically pleasing of Pedro’s artwork. In fact, the few internet photographs I’ve seen of the model show it suspended overhead so the underside of the wing can be appreciated. In addition, the prominent black and white roundels used by the Condor Legion have always struck me as odd, as they remind me of the “double-cross” device worn by Tomainia’s Adenhoid Hynkel in the Charlie Chaplin film, The Great Dictator.

While not a scale model by any means, it was a challenging build and I’m glad to add it to my air arm. As far as wartime propaganda is concerned, this Avion de Bombardeo did carry the clear message to the Spanish people that the Nationalist cause was being aided by a strong and sophisticated world power. And, just five months after the end of the Spanish Civil War, the German Luftwaffe would prove that very strength and sophistication to a worried world.

Thanks to Tom Greensfelder for his scan of this hard to find model.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4191.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4198.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4204.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4231.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4222.jpg  

Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-avion-de-bombardeo-2.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-avion-de-bombardeo-1.jpg  
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  #114  
Old 09-08-2016, 12:11 PM
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Wad Cutter Wad Cutter is offline
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Fantastic add to the collection Thumb. Another good one from a past so long ago. My deepest thanks. wc
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  #115  
Old 09-08-2016, 04:00 PM
Tom Greensfelder Tom Greensfelder is offline
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Thumb Dog: another beautiful and incredibly informative build. The Germans certainly wasted no opportunity to get their own back after the Armistice.

It's such a pleasure to see these venerable models built up, I'm more than happy to keep supplying you with scans as you need them.
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  #116  
Old 09-08-2016, 04:57 PM
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rockpaperscissor rockpaperscissor is offline
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So nice, I had to look at the photos twice!
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I don't always build models, but when I do... I prefer paper. Keep your scissors sharp, my friends.
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  #117  
Old 09-09-2016, 08:45 AM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Just a quick thank you to ashevilleangler, The DC, Art Deco, Wad Cutter and rockpaperscissor for your interest in, and complements about my Spanish wartime models. And to Tom Greensfelder...you keep sending 'em, and I'll keep building 'em.

Thanks again.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
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  #118  
Old 09-09-2016, 12:09 PM
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Wad Cutter Wad Cutter is offline
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Thank you Thumb for all your hard work and your sharing. wc
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  #119  
Old 09-15-2016, 07:42 AM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Ever since I was a kid, I’ve always liked searchlights. The first time I stood next to one in operation, (in the middle of the last century), I was impressed by the machinery, the heat, the noise, and the seemingly endless beam of light making its way to the heavens. The purpose-built trailer carried both the searchlight and the growling generator that supplied all the needed electrical power.

In those days, searchlights used carbon arc lamps to create their beam of light. Basically, a carbon arc lamp produces its light between two electrically charged carbon rods. The electricity flowing into the rods is so great that even though the rods are not touching, a brilliant arc of light occurs in free air. This incredibly hot and bright light would be reflected into space by a 60 inch silvered, parabolic reflector, all the while dumping out vast amounts of UV light. The first practical electric light, carbon arc lights are rarely used these days, being replaced by Xenon Arc lamps.

When I first heard of a paper model searchlight from the Spanish Civil War era, I wanted to build it, sight unseen. Tom Greensfelder had one in his collection, and he graciously sent me a scan. Designed by the prolific Pedro Sabidon Feliu, I was quite surprised when I saw the model. To say it is “colorful” would be an understatement. Printed in bold, primary colors, Tom said that the original is printed on coated paper, making it even more electrifying to the eye.

Published by the heretofore unknown Talleres Graficos Marsiega of Madrid, this may be a later reprint of a model produced by one of the better known publishers seen in this thread. Titled the Reflector, the model does not have the look of a wartime searchlight. The vivid colors make it more appropriate for advertising a carnival than spotlighting an incoming bomber. But I like the model all the same, as it adds a splash of color to my shelves.

Real searchlights of the time were rather delicate affairs, with a multi-piece glass face that often covered an array of vertical shutters used for signaling, as seen on this model. Also, there was a clockwork or electric mechanism that drove the two steadily deteriorating carbon rods together so that the gap between them remained constant. I would call the model more of a wagon than a trailer, with its yellow, wooden deck in company with four red, green and blue steel wheels. It must have been a jarring ride for the fragile components of the searchlight. But, this is not the first time a designer has put pen to paper without understanding the thing he is drawing.

A fairly easy build, the Reflector is a welcome addition to my growing Guerra Civil collection. Thanks, Tom

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4459.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4461.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4463.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4464.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4470.jpg  

Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4474.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-reflector.jpg  
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  #120  
Old 09-22-2016, 07:36 AM
Thumb Dog Thumb Dog is offline
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Hi All,

Today’s vintage paper model is another in the series of sand-operated machines published by Construccion Gerarmar of Barcelona, Spain. Drawn by the same unknown hand as the recently posted Horizontal Steam Engine, this model goes by the name of Motor Diesel. The blue, A-frame motor compares favorably with the attached photograph of an early, stationary diesel engine. Invented by Rudolph Diesel at the end of the 19th century, a diesel engine compresses air to the point where it becomes hot enough to ignite the liquid diesel fuel injected into the cylinder. Highly efficient, the diesel grew to be the engine of choice for power, durability and economy in the age of internal combustion engines.

I built this model with the same goal I had for the steam engine, namely, that the flywheel be able to turn while dragging the piston arm along for the ride. A bit trickier than the previous steam engine, construction proceeded without too much difficulty, getting a number of things right the first time, for a change. The flywheel was built up of four layers of mat board to make a heavy, substantial wheel measuring 3 ¼ inches in diameter. The crankshaft is brass, riding in bearings made from tiny brass eyelets. Note that the flywheel has gear teeth drawn just underneath the rim of the wheel. The teeth of this bull gear are the driving force of the motor, and they would have been attached to a pinion which in turn would drive an electrical generator, shafting or belt to do the work.

This model was similar in design to the Horizontal Steam Engine in that it was intended to be powered by falling sand. Originally, there was a sizable green tolva, or chute, to be folded up and placed inside the square fuel tank. A hole in the tank’s top was provided to introduce the sand, which filled the tolva, which focused the sand into a narrow stream that fell freely through the air and onto a paper turbine housed in the brick structure below. I’m certain the Mothers of Spain were not happy about any of this.

After a few keystrokes in Paint, the evidence of sand-operation was removed from the model. I like the tough, purposeful look of the Motor Diesel and am happy to see it next to my completed Horizontal Steam Engine. One point of criticism…I would have thought a round tank would be more practical for liquid storage than a square one, but I kvetch.

There is a third sand-operated model published by Construccion Gerarmar known as Noria de Verbena, or The Fair Ferris Wheel, and I’m including a picture of it below. I’m not going to build this model, as it doesn’t really fit with the previous two, but I thought you might like to see it. Both the diesel and Ferris Wheel models are available on the Spanish Museum website mentioned before. Directions to the site and suggestions on how to navigate through it are given in my post to whulsey on 9/2/16.

For me, paper modeling is a quiet and solitary diversion, but it can be dangerous, what with razor-sharp blades cutting thick mat board so close to careless fingers. Luckily, I didn’t suffer any permanent scars while making my Motor Diesel, so there was no need to call my favorite nurse.

Score and fold,

Thumb Dog
Attached Thumbnails
Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4475.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4484.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4496.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4502.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-img_4478.jpg  

Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-p.1.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-p.2.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-p.3.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-p.4.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-p.5.jpg  

Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-motor-diesel-sulzer-engine.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-verbena-p.1.jpg   Paper Models as Propaganda During the Spanish Civil War-nurse-diesel.jpg  
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models, paper, war, model, civil, spanish, simple, series, flags, thread, number, red, propaganda, flag, galvez, show, shown, granada, built, 2-dimentional, nationalists, drawing, pattern, wars, symbols

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