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  #11  
Old 02-02-2016, 11:55 AM
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abhovi abhovi is offline
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OK, so I will try to do a thread on building a fluit.

Don't think you can learn a lot of it though. I'm not exactly a good model builder, compared to other paper modelers on this forum. Actually I must confess that starting a next phase on a model under my hands mostly serves to hide the mistakes made in the previous one....

But first I have to finish my pinas and hone my photographing skills.

About materials: I discovered that working with plastic trips for the outside planking is OK, but don't forget to prime the object first before painting. I often hold the model between my upper legs when working on it and with this first model I noticed I was wearing off the paint on the white plastic. Not really a nice effect I can tell you. Spraying primer gives a better hold for the paint you apply.

I love paper als a material, but not for sails. You get a much better effect if using the finest unbleached cotton available. Go the a shop where they sell cloth. You will be surprised to see how many qualities of cloth you can get there for practically nothing. I give the cloth a wash of tea to get rid of the too white color, although unbleached cotton is not entirely white already. I cut out the sails and glue bolt ropes around them with white glue. The lines of the stitched cloths can be done with a pencil. Next I marl them to the yard and make a contraption to spread the sail as liked. Then I spray it wet with a spray can of starch, women use before ironing laundry. Then I take a hair dryer and blow against the backside, until the sail is dry. The result is a nice bellowing sail, which holds its shape even after a long time.

Here are some shots I made this afternoon. As you can see I have to repair the paint where it is worn.

Thank you all for your reactions and kndeckhand: I think the Kalmar Nickel is a beautiful replica, but I am a bit puzzled about the blue color. Is there any source that indicates the original ship was painted like that? In my opinion blue was a very expensive and not verity stable pigment in those days, so I really wonder why it was chosen for the replica.
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Dutch pinas 1671-dsc01654-small-.jpg   Dutch pinas 1671-dsc01655-small-.jpg   Dutch pinas 1671-dsc01656-small-.jpg  
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2016, 07:44 PM
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eatcrow2 eatcrow2 is offline
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Great tips on sail making!! Thanks for taking the time to post..
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2016, 09:26 PM
elliott elliott is offline
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Thank you for the mini-tutorial on sail making -looking forward to more.
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  #14  
Old 02-02-2016, 11:56 PM
billy833 billy833 is offline
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Great tips! Thank you!
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  #15  
Old 02-03-2016, 12:04 PM
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abhovi abhovi is offline
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Talking about staining cloth with tea: I forgot to mention that you have to make sure that the cloth is entirely soaked with water before you put it into the tea. If you do it with dry cloth you will see a set of fantastic irregular stains instead of a nice equal color...

For carvings on the pinas I used a two-component 'kneadable steel'. It comes in a tube-like shape with a blue outside and a white core. You slice off a piece and knead it until it is light blue. Than you have about five minutes to make your statue, so you have to work quickly and with very small amounts. After drying you can still cut it with a sharp knife. It's not ideal, but it works reasonably easy if you know exactly what you want to make and it sticks to the underground, so you can make the decoration `in situ`. Wrong parts can be cut off and new material can be added if necessary. I use a sharp and a dull tooth pick to shape it the way I like. As soon as I have discovered how to make close-ups with my camera I will show what it can look like.
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  #16  
Old 02-03-2016, 01:03 PM
elliott elliott is offline
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That would be great! I'd love to see some closeups. I know what material you're talking about - never would have thought of using it for carvings and figures.
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  #17  
Old 02-03-2016, 10:20 PM
kentyler kentyler is offline
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not against cloth sails

but i always thought the weave was a little to big and i don't like the way they hang...

here are some pictures of some paper sails on a model of the philidelphia... they are rice paper, build up in sections and molded wet over a clay mold to give them some shape

its really interesting to me the different "feel" that different materials and techniques give models... i'm not really a "purist", and love experimenting with different approaches
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Dutch pinas 1671-20160203_200006.jpg   Dutch pinas 1671-20160203_200036.jpg  
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  #18  
Old 02-04-2016, 02:04 AM
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abhovi abhovi is offline
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How big the weave is depends on your choice of cloth. This enlarged picture here shows there isn't any weave visible, while at the same time the ratlines show through the cloth. A matter of choice...

There are many materials that can be used for sails. Plastic sheet, for instance. Like you I'm not a purist and I use whatever gives me a pleasing result. Apparently cloth works for me, paper or plastic for somebody else. But one nice thing about our hobby is that we can do things our own way. Nobody is wrong, as long as you like what you make...
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2016, 07:31 AM
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eatcrow2 eatcrow2 is offline
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Love all these info updates!!
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2016, 12:42 PM
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Vermin_King Vermin_King is online now
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I always enjoy seeing sailing ship builds. I have only one ship build that I would say was successful, so seeing an expertly-built ship model is always a pleasure.

And thank you for educating us on your process
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