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Old 07-02-2022, 07:56 AM
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Dane Dane is offline
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Help me please translate a sentence

Hello to all.
I study Ashley Book of Knots. In the beginning of Chapter 6, I found a rhyme:

Knots aft on the port si’
Forward on the starboard;
Opposite the left eye,
All around and inboard.

The Rigging Lanyard Knot
(Sailors’ Work Rhyme)

Clue me in, please, what does it mean the word si’ in the first line?
Thank you.
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Old 07-02-2022, 08:06 AM
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PacificWind PacificWind is offline
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I'm not 100% sure but something tells me it's a shortened form of "side".
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Old 07-02-2022, 09:30 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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I am not sure either.
But I agree with PacifcWind. It is probably a short version of the word "side".
Some of the English accents away from London may have a tendency to shorten the word "side" to "si". Maybe someone in the U.K. could confirm that.
Mike
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Old 07-02-2022, 03:36 PM
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Thank you gents. I think so too. Because I suspect it is a rhyme between first and third line: si' (side without -d) - eye.
Pardon me for my importunity, but unexpectedly appeared another question important for me. At the same place in the ABOK there is a word "lannier" (See p.119, #683, 13th line from the top of the page).
Would you be so kind to let me know what does it mean.
ABOK: "Lever, in 1808, speaking of “Matthew Walker’s Knot,” says: “This is a handsome knot for the end of a lannier.” I do not recall any earlier direct evidence of the employment of a Lanyard Knot".
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Old 07-02-2022, 04:14 PM
John Wagenseil John Wagenseil is offline
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According to the Oxford English Dictionary lanyer / lannier are dialectical variants of lanyard.
-----------------------------

Also:
lan·yard
/ˈlanyərd/
noun: lanyard; plural noun: lanyards; noun: laniard; plural noun: laniards


  1. a rope threaded through a pair of deadeyes, used to adjust the tension in the rigging of a sailing vessel.
  2. a cord passed around the neck, shoulder, or wrist for holding a knife, whistle, or similar object.


    Origin

Late Middle English lanyer, in the general sense ‘a short length of rope for securing something’, from Old French laniere . The change in the ending in the 17th century was due to association with yard.
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Old 07-03-2022, 04:19 AM
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John Wagenseil!!!
Excellent! Thank you very much. You presented me with a huge amount of time that I would have spent on this investigation.
Thank you for your help! Спасибо большое!
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Old 08-04-2022, 10:07 AM
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Hi all.
I continue to study Ashley's book of knots. And I need in your help again.
Please, explain me two things at once.

The first is mean of words in context of the following sentence: "Stone is slung under a high gear in about the same manner, chain being used instead of rope." (ABOK, p. 43, The Drayman, the last sentence). Is this is about stone lifting with some three legs mechanism and chain?

The second thing. There is a knot Diamond Hitch. Do it names originate from diamond - is a "stone" or diamond - is a rhombus, geometrical figure? Or both cases used. Then what cases one used, and where is the second used?
Thank you.
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Old 08-04-2022, 10:31 AM
Burning Beard Burning Beard is online now
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I'm not sure about the first one, but I think the "stone" is an anchor.

A diamond hitch is a type of knot. However, the only time I have seen it used has been on pack saddles on horses or mules. it goes over the top of the stuff that is between the cross pieces (like to Xs) on the top of the saddle.
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Old 08-04-2022, 01:06 PM
Laurence Finston Laurence Finston is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane View Post
Hello to all.
I study Ashley Book of Knots.
One of my favorite books since I discovered it at the library many years ago.

The taut-line hitch comes in handy quite often (don't use where safety is a concern, though!).

When I first became interested in knotting, it wasn't possible for me to find a marlinspike. The last time I checked this, it seemed like knotting equipment, including marlinspikes, was available on-line.
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Old 08-04-2022, 01:13 PM
Laurence Finston Laurence Finston is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane View Post
Hello to all.
Clue me in, please, what does it mean the word si’ in the first line?

It's certainly "side" since "port side" and "starboard side" are the normal terms for the sides of a boat or ship. And "fore" and "aft" for the front and back, as you probably know, and "aloft" and "below" for up in the rigging and below deck, respectively. Don't know how a normal word like "below" snuck in there.
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