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  #71  
Old 01-16-2022, 07:22 PM
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Thanks for the photos, Tyler....

Here's some build tips shared from Tyler to add to the thread:

"This model would take quite a while to describe a walk through. However, build tips I've got for ya would be...

1. When building scratch, detailed parts are easy to build with the right tools. To start I simplify the parts down to their basic shapes. That usually ends up being some kind of rectangle, circle, or bar. Once the basic shapes are built I glue them together to make the complicated part.

2. Scratch building consists of measure, cut, remeasure, trim repeat a few times until the shape is within mm of what I'm looking for. For example, the armor on the Stringbag. To do that, I usually get one corner cut to fit into the position it is being cut to fit. I will rough mark the size and cut it out. Put it back in place and mark and cut it again. All while taking care to get the shape I need. If I cut it too small, I'll just trace and recut it.

3. Sanding. Sanding is amazing for scratch work. Getting soft edges, unique shapes and smoothly operating functional parts would be very difficult without sanding. I have a rechargeable battery powered Dremel and some sanding wheels I've built to shape parts. I have 220gt, 320gt, and 400gt wheels. Two of each grit, one with a 1.5cm diameter and another with a 4cm diameter. (pic)

4. Laminating and paper weight. I use 3 weights of paper for my builds. Typical printer paper for glue tabs, small details, and cleanup. My most commonly used paper is 110lb cardstock, basic card that is the usual thickness of kit paper. I've also got special 140lb heavy duty card for formers, mechanical components, or thick laminated parts. I use laminated paper so much in my building. The strength for structural parts that comes with thicker wt paper and laminated layers is everything. My goose has a 4 layer laminated spar running the entire wingspan, 2mm. I have yet to find a supplier for 1mm cardboard.

5. Scratch building may seem overwhelming at first, but to be honest, it is a lot more simple than you would think. Once started, there are things that you have to build before you can do something else. It ends up being pretty linear in the build process. I would love to spread scratch building. Anyone interested in it, I would love to help with a build or two to help get the basics down. Reach out and I'll do my best to help with an intro level build."
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  #72  
Old 01-24-2022, 10:30 PM
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Thanks, Tyler, for the comments and hints!
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  #73  
Old 01-24-2022, 10:45 PM
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Tyler's other kit...

The last exhibit to discuss and share is also from the new participant, Tyler, who had rented another space for his jet; a F/A-18E "Super Hornet."

The build was again interesting from the pint-of-view that it was a complete scratch build; not created from a plan or a designed kit. The silver body was large, detailed, and filled with surprises [see pic 1}. To get an appraisal of the size, note the builder at the table behind his exhibits, with the Swordfish next to the Hornet [see pic 2].

As mentioned, the kits was very interactive and full of surprises. Here Tyler touches a control, prompting the refueling bracket to pop out of the kit's nose {see pic 3]. Then he touched a lever at the top, causing the canopy to open {see pic 3-4].

Another hidden lever dropped the landing gear doors and the gear unfolded [pics 5-8].

And there's more...
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Last edited by THE DC; 01-24-2022 at 10:57 PM.
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  #74  
Old 01-24-2022, 11:15 PM
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More Hornet Exhibit...

If that's not impressive enough, more levers were hidden within the body for more operations!

Another lever embedded in the body triggered linkage that moved the ailerons [see pics 1-5]. Near that trigger mechanism was another that moved the flaps [see pics 6 & 7].


And there was more...
Attached Thumbnails
The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-halfly-exhibit-jet-movement-9.jpg   The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-halfly-exhibit-jet-movement-7.jpg   The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-halfly-exhibit-jet-movement-8.jpg   The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-img_2869.jpg   The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-img_2873.jpg  

The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-img_2875.jpg   The 2021 International Paper Modeler's Convention Visit in Pictures and Words-img_2877.jpg  
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Old 01-24-2022, 11:22 PM
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Finishing the Hornet review...

Near the aft of the model, a level was also placed to operate tail stabilizers [see pics 1-3].

Tyler had devised the landing gear to fold and curl into the bays when desiring th have a closed bay [see pics 4-6].

Though without these movements, the kit would have been an impressive scratch build of handcrafted design, the addition of so many real-life operations, replicated with internal levels, added a level of value an impressiveness to this kit that was hard to adequately demonstrate in pictures.

My thanks to Tyler for taking so much time to describe and demonstrate his kit.

I'll be following up with some comments, from the artist, about his build, if he's willing!
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  #76  
Old 01-25-2022, 10:40 PM
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From Tyler:

The F/A 18E

In my opinion this model was fairly ambitious. I had never built a jet before so it was also new territory, new shapes, and new subframe. Like the Swordfish it is completely scratch built, not a single software generated pattern was used. One of the better internet tools I learned to use was a truncated cone calculator. This helped to draft/build the cone like shapes (ie. external tanks, engine exhausts, and missiles) I built it in sections starting with the nose and moving backwards. My goal with this model was to push my capabilities and learn as much as possible with new designs, materials, and shapes. To achieve that goal I implemented moving components into this build. Before a single part had been made, I had written down and drafted the moving components and how they were to work. Those drawings weren't 100% but they gave me something to work with and plan around. A new material I was excited to use was aluminum tape (HVAC tape). I covered most external surfaces with the stuff to give it the metal look. The tape is pretty susceptible to scratches, so I took advantage of that by using a rivet wheel and scoring tool to create panels along the surfaces.

This model took a very long time to make. Some days it felt like I'd never complete it, others felt like it would be done next week. All in all, I estimate that this model has on average perhaps 2-3 hours of work a day. That over the course of about 275 days (Dec 25th to the IPMC) would be somewhere between 550-825 hours of work dedicated to this model.

Some other details that would likely otherwise go unnoticed: Inside the engine nacelles are turbofans. Along those lines, inside the engine exhaust is roughly modeled the interior of the engine. In the cockpit, behind the seat is a metal mesh with a whole bunch of replicated electronics underneath it. The cockpit as a whole is pretty cool. The landing gear have some extra detail as well. The inside of the plane is pretty cool, there are so many moving parts and formers. I wish I could see it all without the skin of the aircraft.

The Super Hornet has 12 moving assemblies designed and built into it.

1: Midair refueling nozzle deploys from the nose using a simple wheel/arm connected to the nozzle arm.

2:The nose gear is an assembly of moving components put together to make the gear work. The wheels spin on a wooden dowel. The gear has suspension using a pen spring imbedded into the gear arm. The arm actuator is used to push the gear up and down using a control input on the spine of the jet. This was done using a rigid metal wire through the entire support arm and up into the fuselage.

3: Similarly paired with the nose gear, is the nose gear bay doors. Those were difficult to build and at this point it's much more simple to say they just work... It took about 5 different iterations of the design plus tweaks here and there. Totaling about 15-20 hours of work to get to the point I was happy with it. Looking back I'd redesign it again if I had the chance.

4: The canopy. The damn canopy. While it's fine it's not my finest work. It completes the job for what it's designed to do but is clunky, misshapen, and crazed in a few places. It is lifted with another simple lever with a wire lead then attaching to the canopy. Building that canopy took literally dozens of failed attempts using all sorts of methods. My wife one day stumbled across vacuum forming and we eventually made it work with a clay mold of the cockpit.
The detail in the cockpit is one feature of the jet I'm extremely proud of. The detail, weathering, display panels, electronics, seats, and colors really came together for me. For the screens I purchased some holographic foil. glued it on a black background and it gave me the blue shimmer for the screens.

5-7: The wings. The damn wings took multiple attempts to get right. They were rebuilt, torn apart and rebuilt again. The reason being, angles were wrong, parts didn't move easily enough, strength was an issue, excess friction, and reliability to be operated hundreds of times.

5-6: The F/A-18E has a very special wing capable of many shapes. While I wasn't able to replicate it 100% I feel like I achieved maybe 70%. To accomplish that I designed into the wings a leading edge slat that was coupled with the flaps. I mathed out the appropriate lengths, angles, parabolas, cosine over tangent, etc. to make it so that when the flaps were deployed 45 the leading edge slats were half of that, roughly 22.5. This one is also better described as it works. I know how but explaining it isn't worth it, just know it works (pretty well I'm happy to say, took a few designs/rebuilds). The slats/flaps are controlled by a lever on the spine of the jet. There are two wooden dowels, one of which operate the wings slats/flaps. The system is mirrored on both sides. For this assembly there is 7 moving components.

7: The ailerons are similarly operated and designed to the flaps/slats system. Nothing very special about them except that if I could I would redesign the entire aileron assembly to work without any external components. The ailerons are controlled via the second dowel next to the slat/flap control.

8: Moving back, the rudders were difficult to build simply due to the instability of the mounting points on the empennage. In order to get the shape I wanted back there it had very little hard points that would allow me to mount the rudders. I had the chance to practice my former designing once again and used that chance to build a very sturdy rudder. I was in a hurry to get them done in order to have it complete for the IPMC. Because of that, I wasn't able to put as much thought into the design process as I normally do. They work, they look good, and I'm happy with how it turned out in the end.

9: The elevators were fun to build. More former practice on these wings too. The system moves off a simple bar connecting the two wings that pivots along that bars' axis. In the center of that bar protruding out the top is a short length of rigid wire. That wire is used to move the elevators up and down. Simple assembly, took very little time, and I'm happy with the result.

10: Ugh, the main landing gear. My absolute least favorite part of this entire build. I've built the gear to have suspension in the shock using a pen spring, similar to the nose gear. Additional details were added to replicate hydraulic lines, wires, brakes, and other minor details. It took me months of designs, redesigns, and mock builds to get something even resembling close to what I wanted. The reason this gear was so challenging was due to the way they folded in. Standard gear will fold on a single axis.(X or Y) The gear arm is usually 90 off the pivot axis. Not these ones... The landing gear on the F/A-18 is weird. They're swung back roughly 45, have a pivot in middle for suspension, and the pivot for the folding part of the gear is a weird angle using all three X/Y/Z planes. Replicating that in paper without any software was a pain to say the least. I did finally make it happen though. They're not perfect, I used some shortcuts, but the end result is very similar to the actual aircraft. To this day I have yet to figure out a reliable way to make a control assembly to operate the two gear open and closed. Perhaps someday..

11: The main gear bay doors are pretty simple. They open with a piece of paper pushing out from the gear well pushing the doors open. To close them, retract the paper pushing them open and an elastic connection pulls the gear closed. It's a simple component. Regardless, I count it as one of the 12 main assemblies.

12: The final moving assembly is the landing hook. This aircraft is a navy fighter/attack roll aircraft and as such needs to be able to land on a carrier. The landing hook is pretty simple as well. All it is is a slider with a wire attached to it, the other end is then attached to the landing hook boom. Push it out and the hook drops, pull it back in and the hook retracts.

I don't quite know what else to say about it, I know everything there is to know. This may even be too much, I don't know. If you have any other questions or want some pictures mid build I can get them for ya. Hope this is what you were looking for man!!

-Tyler H
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  #77  
Old 01-30-2022, 03:04 AM
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Post And that was the convention...

So that's a little tour of the 2021 IPMC in pictures and words. I hope that those of you who went, had a great visit for details you might have missed, while those that haven't might be inclined to try next year.

The IPMC is an exercise in fellowship for members who have known each other for years; a social gathering of peers with skill and craftsmanship. They know each other well and for a long time. It is also a place for new talent to join and experience the opportunity to share their skill and artistry.

The IPMC is also an opportunity to exchange skills and techniques in cutting, gluing, edging, folding, and other processes that turn paper into 3D art. Since its open to the public, it's also a valuable chance to inform others of the unique craftsmanship that paper-modelling represents.

Young persons today have limited experiences in craft and hand skills. They are more prone to computer activities. Many have had little mentoring by older adults in guided activities. Many have experienced far less social interaction than previous generations. There are social skills of value that these events provide. Young people benefit from such experiences.

The discipline involved in paper modelling, as an activity, is valuable in developing attention, focus upon detail, the ability to follow directions & processes, as well as persistence in completing tasks, even when challenges might be discouraging. As much as these skills and benefits, it can also be fun and rewarding. Building with your own hands can be an inspiring experience; empowering even.

In the years to come, I hope that the forum will continue to shed light on this craft, bettering the skills of the experienced, as well as inspiring the hands of the learners.

I hope this tour encourages that potential.


If any other exhibitors wish to share details of their exhibit, or their build techniques, feel free to use this thread. If anyone who didn't get to visit has questions about specific kits or build tips, feel free to ask.

Please use this thread to further the opportunities that the IPMC can foster.

Thanks for your attention and interest!


The DC
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  #78  
Old 01-30-2022, 08:02 AM
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Thanks for the convention documentary, DC. It's always a fun venue and something I've looked forward to, since the very beginning some 20 years ago. One gets to see old friends and meet new ones, all while seeing amazing builds and interesting subjects.

Thanks to the convention team for putting this together every year, and a special thanks to Greg for providing a table for my small display.

Bob
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  #79  
Old 02-08-2022, 11:15 PM
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Thanks Bob,

I wish I had taken better pics. Maybe someone will do that next year for us all.

I have been told that next year will have a nautical theme for encouraged kits. Be thinking about that, if you're considering attending. Bring your "on or under" the sea builds (I'm guessing float planes and flying boats will count toward that theme?).

You might also be interested in following some of the people here who's work was exhibited at the IPMC, and reviewed here, in this current "winding-down" thread. I know that Tyler, the new participant that was reviewed last in this thread, is presenting another scratch build at this time; a thread that you can find that is titled "Scratch Built Grumman Goose G-21A." I recommend it. He has recently, not only been sharing the process of designing/building a worthwhile craft, but he is even sharing build-details, with hand-drawn design plans and close up pics of rudder controls and wheels axel placement. The beauty of the work is only exceeded by the value of his ideas and build hints; a very detailed thread.

If thinking of going to the IPMC next year, I advise a bit of research regarding hotels in the area. If the one where its being held is too pricey, be careful to check out the other possibilities. Online reviews may not be accurate or representative of actual living conditions in those establishments.

Also plan ahead your food needs. There are a few fast food locations near, but the only one really close, without traffic challenges, is a small Burger King down the street. You can meet interesting convention members there, I can attend to, even if a Whopper is not your dish of choice!

Peter Ansoff is the best person to contact to get details regarding participating or other attendance questions. He can be PM'ed here at this forum.

Thanks for following me through this walk-thru. I hope you met some interesting people, enjoyed experiencing some interesting talent, and perhaps most importantly, learned a few things that will promote your enjoyment and further participation in the paper-modelling craft.

What we make may be "paper-thin," but the potential of this skill-set could rock many expectations, with the clever turn of a pair of scissors!
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  #80  
Old 02-09-2022, 09:11 AM
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I'd like to add in that the regular cast of irregulars that attend every year are very welcoming to new members.
I managed to make it the past few years (I missed this year due to too tight finances, and unreliable airline connections...the flight I would have booked on got cancelled that day...) Hopefully things with the airlines are straightened out by next year.
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