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Old 07-01-2011, 08:40 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Earth Tectonics

Now that I finished the RAF Se5a, I feel I can move into another model. To avoid repetition I don’t want to build two consecutive planes, and since I like some variety in my models this one fits perfectly.

The Earth Tectonics model is designed by Chuck Clark. You can find it in his interesting website: Tectonics cut’n’fold, Maybe world maps with constant-scale natural boundaries

I became aware of this model last year, and it has been in my mind since. It looks very interesting and complex as well so I was avoiding it until I felt I could face it.

Last year however I did assemble the somehow similar “Foldable Phobos”, also available in Chuck’s website. The big difference is that Phobos is just a cut-fold-and-glue model that sits static, while this Earth Tectonics model is designed to move, representing the movement of each tectonic plate as it is in reality, so even though the model is just one piece, there is a big complexity involved.

Now the time has come to start this once and for all. I have no doubts that this will teach me something new. And you know may saying: every model I build is a good practice for the next model that will come later. This will be an interesting challenge

The model is available as one big jpg image measuring 14.37 X 11 inches (almost double letter size) at 300 dpi. So the quality is good. Although evidently based on maps using modern technology, most of the details look drawn by hand, but that’s not bad since it gives the model particular charm that is delightful to see.

For this model I went to a printer and had the image plotted at 19X27 inches (70X50 cms), much bigger than its original size. I opted for this size since I thought that making it small would render it quite difficult to handle. And making it too big would have the same effect. At this size the distance from pole to pole on the surface is about 11 inches (29 cms approx.) So I expect the final diameter of the model to be near 7 inches (18 cms).

The paper used is “calcio” (“calcium”) I don’t know if that reference is available in other countries. It’s a very white and porous (hence, matte) paper that gives very bright colours and dries fast. Its weight (so I was told) is120 gsm.

It was printed on a “HP - Designjet 130” printer with continuous injection system. I tested the print and it is water-proof, and also alcohol-proof. So I don’t fear any ink smears or ugly accidents in case something wet touches the paper.

In the first photo you can see the printed model with a 30 cms (12 inches) plastic square as reference for size.

I will start by cutting leaving a good space off the borders, and by glueing together what is supposed to be together, like some gaps in Antarctica and the Pacific Ocean (and other parts as well) that appear in the model because of the way the Earth surface must be flattened to 2 dimensions. Chuck gives a good reference map of the tectonics to use as a guide in the same page where this model is available.

I know not how difficult this will be, or when will I finish it. But I really don’t care as long as it gives me a pleasant modeling time!
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Earth Tectonics-earth_001.jpg   Earth Tectonics-earth_002.jpg   Earth Tectonics-earth_003.jpg  
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:52 AM
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As an Earth scientist I am very interested in this.

I definitely will print this out now I know of it's existence

Rick
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickstef View Post
....I definitely will print this out now I know of it's existence

Rick
Yeah, but will ya' build it?
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:39 AM
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rickstef rickstef is offline
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I will give it a shot Ray
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:06 AM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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Go Ruben

Hi Ruben,
Be sure to read again the caveats for this map, over on my website. remember it has only ever been assembled ONCE. And it is an EXPERIMENTAL map.
Exactly how to assemble the moving/sliding/overlapping/subducting parts has NOT been worked out. So this is less like a simple craft project, where diligence and meticulousness will eventually win out, and much more like an art project, where your particular judgments, creativeness with paper, and (even) luck will have more affect on the finished product.

How much of its active potential you are able to capture will be the mark of your success, and it should be easy to exceed my attempt. Since I am clumsy with my hands, and used relatively large pieces of clear tape (and too many pieces of tape, I see in hindsight), I was able to activate only a few of the possible places.
I'm not unlike a scout who has identified a new path into previously unknown territory, without making it very easy for the rest of you to follow along. Except for the fact that you wouldn't have this map at all if it weren't for me, I haven't been much help.

Careful, though: those lines around Antarctica that you picture so well, and cite as merely necessary for the unfolding, are in fact actual tectonic features, specifically sliding (side-to-side slippage) fractures. So they are part of the possible tectonic activity.

I'm rooting for you.

Go Ruben.
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Old 07-01-2011, 12:59 PM
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Speaking of Tectonics...

Picture of my wife and I standing between the American and Eurasian plates in Iceland last month.

Very cool location. Wonder f it shows on the model?
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Earth Tectonics-iceland.jpg  
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:17 PM
rightbasicbuilding rightbasicbuilding is offline
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further thought

Ruben,
Regarding the Pacific Ocean seams -- these are topographic ridges transverse to the highly active spreading centers, aka mid-ocean ridge, where new crust burbles to the surface.
But unlike the highly active mid-ocean ridge, the transverse ridges are "cold." That is, no slippage, no active faulting. So, unlike the seams near Antarctica, it is okay to glue these seams up solid.
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Old 07-01-2011, 02:25 PM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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Chuck:
Thank you very much for the information!

I'm sure this model will teach me a lot, not only in geological terms
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:35 AM
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Rubenandres77 Rubenandres77 is offline
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First advances.

Since the Pacific ridges are cold and not active I decided to start from there to begin shaping the crust.

Part of the Pacific is now assembled, and the round shape is becoming evident.

This bit of work took me something like 2 hours and I didn’t even make it properly. It is not a clean assembly, and I couldn’t give proper shape to some of the accidents, so gaps are clearly visible, especially from behind.

Earth Tectonics-earth_004.jpg

Earth Tectonics-earth_005.jpg


I’m starting to thing that for a good handling of the model it would be better if I cut it in 2 or 3 major parts. Otherwise I’ll experience serious problems dealing with shaping some details. Question is: where to cut? I’ll have to study carefully the tectonics maps to make a proper decision.

As for the assembly, I thing joining strips are a good option for some parts. Even though they are time consuming, with a little care they can be very useful. But it is definite that they can not be used everywhere if the idea is to have moving plates in the model.

I’m still trying to figure the best way to make the intersection of the plates. Probably a good option would be to use loose paper strips. Or maybe not too lose. Or probably some kind of dove-tail joints may be also a good option, avoiding the use of glue at all.

Very interesting challenge indeed
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Old 07-03-2011, 11:03 AM
Zathros Zathros is offline
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When I looked at that model, it looked like basically you need to cut out everything that isn't painted or has a line on it. The plates that are stable should be the anchor points and then work with the rest? Otherwise, it could not be built. This is the conclusion I came to after looking at the one that was built. Also, if the plates are going to move, there has to be a compromise, as far as which plate is going to go over or under.
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