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  #121  
Old 10-03-2021, 08:33 AM
Michael Mash's Avatar
Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Boose View Post
Beautiful boats!

The superstructure really was a fortress wall, wasn't it?

Don

Yes it was. That vintage photo shows some of the sailors on the main deck, at the base of "the wall", giving it good perspective. The whole thing creates a very interesting but thorny project.
Mike
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  #122  
Old 10-03-2021, 08:46 AM
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JP64 JP64 is offline
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Hello, Mike !!

Wonderful building of the main guns (they were surely Canet guns.. isn't so ?) and very beautiful building of the boats.
Can you just describe a little how did you built such boats? theyre very clean in hull shape ..

Ciao
Jp

P.S.
the main guns are very similar to ones of the Spanish battleship Pelayo ....I have built an 1:100 model of such ship about 10 years ago (not in paper...). Infact the Pelayo was built in french shipyards...

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Last edited by JP64; 10-03-2021 at 08:50 AM. Reason: insert the image
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  #123  
Old 10-03-2021, 09:11 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JP64 View Post
Hello, Mike !!

Wonderful building of the main guns (they were surely Canet guns.. isn't so ?) and very beautiful building of the boats.
Can you just describe a little how did you built such boats? theyre very clean in hull shape ..

Ciao
Jp

P.S.
the main guns are very similar to ones of the Spanish battleship Pelayo ....I have built an 1:100 model of such ship about 10 years ago (not in paper...). Infact the Pelayo was built in french shipyards...

Thanks JP. Yes, those guns on Pelayo are very similar to those on Neptune. I think Pelayo was built a little earlier than Neptune. But they are both from the same era. I am not certain whether or not Neptune's 340mm guns were designed by Gustave Canet (1846–1913). But it is possible. Sounds like that might be a good subject for some research.

Regarding Boats: I will be building several more during the next few days. I will capture some images and try to provide a good description of how I make the boats.

Mike
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  #124  
Old 10-04-2021, 09:59 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JP64 View Post
Can you just describe a little how did you built such boats? theyre very clean in hull shape ..
Ciao
Jp


Hello JP.
In response to your question, here are some details to describe my method for making auxiliary boats. Note that this method produces a V shaped seamless hull. I find it works well for 1:250 scale boats. However, if I was building at 1:200 or larger, a U shaped hull might be preferable. The U shaped hull (or something between the V and the U shape) more accurately depicts the actual shape of this type of hull. And so for larger projects my method is probably not adequate. More shaping is necessary for the U shaped hull.

Now onto the technique. This will be primarily a description of the way I put the thwarts/frame together with the hull. That covers 90% of the process. After that, the additional parts (rudder, oars, etc) need no extra explanation.

Image 109: Score the keel of the paper hull so it can be folded in half.

Image 112 and 113: While the hull is held by lock tweezers, I apply glue along the leading edge of the bow. Some builders like to use a syringe to apply tiny amounts of glue. I created an applicator by attaching a handle to a very thin piece of wire. The wire is stiff but still flexible and springs back when bent. I pick up tiny drops of glue with the tip, and apply where needed.

Image 114 and 115: When the glue is thoroughly dry, the hull can be opened up and the bow seam remains intact.

Image 116 and 117: The card thwarts are pushed up into the bow area and glued.

Image 118: When building boats with square sterns, I always print the hull slightly longer. Then after the thwarts are attached to the hull, I trim the hull to match the stern part of the thwarts.

Image 119: Finally glue is applied to the stern of the assembly.

After the glue has dried, the stern board, rudder, oars, and any other parts can be added to the Thwart/Hull assembly.
There you have it JP.
Best Regards,
Mike
Attached Thumbnails
French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-109-score-keel-hull.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-110-hull-cut-out.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-111-fold-hull-along-score-line.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-112-apply-glue-bow-seam.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-113-apply-glue-bow-seam.jpg  

French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-114-open-hull-when-glue-dry.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-115-open-hull-when-glue-dry.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-116-push-thwarts-into-hull.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-117-glue-thwarts-hull.jpg   French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-118-trim-hull-match-thwarts.jpg  

French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-119-glue-stern-thwarts-hull.jpg  
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  #125  
Old 10-04-2021, 11:19 AM
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JP64 JP64 is offline
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Thanks for the explanation and pics, Mike..

sure, it's so simple and fast... surely is very good for boats in 1:250 scale.. You're right that, when we need a more "U" shaped hull probably we have to find a bit different way to build the boat's hull.

In the model of Borodino, the boats have, on the lower part of the hull, some "cut" to take out, in order to make the two parts close each other, and so the hull can have a more "U" shaped layout.

Instead, in the model of Brooklyn, I have found in the drawings that the "cut" are positioned on the upper board of the hull... Never tried before.. I'll try to take some pics when I'll build the boats (not immediately.. I plan to arrive to such stage in a couple of months)

In any case... compliments for the clearness of the design and mounting of your boats !!

Ciao and Best regards
Jp
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  #126  
Old 10-04-2021, 01:30 PM
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romanmodels romanmodels is offline
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good looking boats Mike
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  #127  
Old 10-04-2021, 03:42 PM
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Don Boose Don Boose is offline
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Excellent tutorial!

Don
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  #128  
Old 10-09-2021, 01:25 PM
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Hi there Mike!

Very beautiful explanation of the auxiliary boat technique! I like the idea with the wire and a handle!
You can make such handle simply form card...after all we are paper modelers here...

I used thus far only a piece of card that is getting tiny on one side...how do you say that in english...tapered, right? But I will certainly try the wire method now! Seems to yield much cleaner results!

Rgds,
Radek
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  #129  
Old 10-09-2021, 01:44 PM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Thanks David, Don and Radek.

Radek: Here is a better photo of the glue applicator tool, for those interested.
I use only white glue. So I don't know how well it would work with other types of glue.

Mike
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French Ironclad Neptune 1:250 Scale-glue-applicator.jpg  
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  #130  
Old 10-09-2021, 01:53 PM
RdK RdK is offline
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Mike,

This is genius!

It reminds me of our pick-tool at the geological department, when we need to pick micrometer small grains under the microscope for later chemical analysis...
Also some palaeontologist use similar picks for their pollen and micro- fossil studies...

I never thought about using it for the glue! Thanks for sharing, Mike! I will definitely make my own one!

Again...Genius!

-RdK
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