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  #11  
Old 02-27-2022, 01:19 PM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by FRD View Post
Bill- The Columbia Gorge never sank, I've never done the, "Columbia"
I should learn to read more carefully. Sorry
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  #12  
Old 03-04-2022, 09:02 AM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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I find myself stuck over the question of how good is good enough. I came across some videos by a man who was presented as an extremely good modeler. Sorry. I don't remember his name. One of my take aways from those videos was that his work looked great from 5 ft away, but up close you could see the defects quite clearly. He even admitted that himself. Also, I've heard from artists that their work changed depending on how far away you were when you looked at it. Some say that the best place to look at a painting is 5-10 ft away so that you get the effected the artist intended when they painted it.


In my case, I've cut out the four disks that will make up the paddle wheel. One is “finished,” and I'm in the process of finishing the others. Painting them has become a problem. The corners of the holes are filling up with paint making the them round instead of square and reducing the size of the holes. I've taken a knife and cut the paint out of the corners, but invariably, that exposes the paper underneath and leaves a spike of paint that is proud of the surface. So, I'm in this cycle of painting, cutting, and painting again. Brush strokes are visible everywhere when they're hand held.


I could throw them all away, and try again with a rattle can of red spray paint, but I worry that I'll find a time in the future when I need to paint something, but won't be able to do it with a spray can. My inexperience is showing itself, or, I can say that what I have is good enough and continue making my paddle wheel disks as good as I can minimizing their defects. From the pictures you'll see that the first is the best. The only difference is the brush used. What would you do?


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  #13  
Old 03-04-2022, 09:07 AM
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Vermin_King Vermin_King is offline
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I would probably print them off in color and then do the edges with ink
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A tax is a fine when you do well.
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  #14  
Old 03-04-2022, 09:40 AM
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Michael Mash Michael Mash is offline
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Hello Bill: Those photos are so close that it is difficult to say.
However, the photo that was taken farther away of the two paddlewheels (image below) shows the top one looking much better than the bottom one.

I am an experimenter. When faced with a question like yours, I experiment until I come up with something that I like. All method options are on the table.

Mike
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The Delta Queen-paddlewheels-top-bottom.jpg  
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  #15  
Old 03-04-2022, 11:32 AM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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How good is good enough?

I find myself stuck over the question of how good is good enough. I came across some videos by a man who was presented as an extremely good modeler. Sorry. I don't remember his name. One of my take aways from those videos was that his work looked great from 5 ft away, but up close you could see the defects quite clearly. He even admitted that himself. Also, I've heard from artists that their work changed depending on how far away you were when you looked at it. Some say that the best place to look at a painting is 5-10 ft away so that you get the effected the artist intended when they painted it.


In my case, I've cut out the four disks that will make up the paddle wheel. One is “finished,” and I'm in the process of finishing the others. Painting them has become a problem. The corners of the holes are filling up with paint making the them round instead of square and reducing the size of the holes. I've taken a knife and cut the paint out of the corners, but invariably, that exposes the paper underneath and leaves a spike of paint that is proud of the surface. So, I'm in this cycle of painting, cutting, and painting again. Brush strokes are visible everywhere when they're hand held.


I could throw them all away, and try again with a rattle can of red spray paint, but I worry that I'll find a time in the future when I need to paint something, but won't be able to do it with a spray can. My inexperience is showing itself, or, I can say that what I have is good enough and continue making my paddle wheel disks as good as I can minimizing their defects. From the pictures you'll see that the first is the best. The only difference is the brush used. What would you do?


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  #16  
Old 03-04-2022, 12:05 PM
Siwi Siwi is offline
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Paint buildup is certainly an issue when fine angles in small scales are concerned. Some people would use an airbrush for this. I would try adding the paint in diluted multiple layers, taking care not to warp or tear the card. This is how people paint plastic kits with a brush. Alternatively, depending on your level of patience you could break this wheel into circles and spokes that could be painted seperately and joined afterwards, avoiding having to paint in the corners.



You could also try cutting a mask from masking tape for the white circle, or gluing it on from a thin paper cutout. It looks from some photos of paddle wheels that the circular bands were proud of the spokes so that could help matters.
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  #17  
Old 03-04-2022, 07:10 PM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Mash View Post
Hello Bill: Those photos are so close that it is difficult to say.
However, the photo that was taken farther away of the two paddlewheels (image below) shows the top one looking much better than the bottom one.

I am an experimenter. When faced with a question like yours, I experiment until I come up with something that I like. All method options are on the table.

Mike

I spent the afternoon experimenting. I cut a piece of scrap, cut some random holes in so I'd have inside corners, and tried again. The card I'm using is 0.6mm thick. When you cut it you end up with a small ridge around the hole. I now know that can be sanded off. I painted it with two coats of undiluted primer, and 3 coats of acrylic paint that I barely diluted. The only texture that you see now is from the card surface, not the brush. So, it all goes in the recycling bin, and I start over tomorrow. There were some mistakes in the pattern, which I fixed a while ago. Now I can print a new pattern that's correct, and everything should be better than it is now.
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  #18  
Old 03-04-2022, 07:19 PM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siwi View Post
Paint buildup is certainly an issue when fine angles in small scales are concerned. Some people would use an airbrush for this. I would try adding the paint in diluted multiple layers, taking care not to warp or tear the card. This is how people paint plastic kits with a brush. Alternatively, depending on your level of patience you could break this wheel into circles and spokes that could be painted separately and joined afterwards, avoiding having to paint in the corners.


You could also try cutting a mask from masking tape for the white circle, or gluing it on from a thin paper cutout. It looks from some photos of paddle wheels that the circular bands were proud of the spokes so that could help matters.

To make the white line on the disk that you see. I made a pattern and traced around it with a white gel pen. Those lines represent steel bands that are screwed to the wheel as a support to keep it together.



I found the idea of pieces intriguing. Your suggesting that after I cut out the holes, I cut the disk into smaller pieces, paint them, and then glue them back together? The card I'm using is 0.6mm thick, so there are surfaces that could be glued. Would the disk loose flexibility? What glue would you use?
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  #19  
Old 03-07-2022, 09:11 PM
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57townsman 57townsman is offline
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Have you considered using colored card stock? Our craft stores usually have quite a selection in the scrapbooking section. If you’re so inclined, you could cut the white rings from copy paper to keep them thin.
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  #20  
Old 03-08-2022, 07:26 PM
Bill Jones Bill Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by 57townsman View Post
Have you considered using colored card stock? Our craft stores usually have quite a selection in the scrapbooking section. If you’re so inclined, you could cut the white rings from copy paper to keep them thin.
I have considered colored card stock, but haven't felt the need to use it. They don't make it in the thickness that I need, and gluing it onto the 0.6mm stock I'm painting would make things wider and out of scale. Another problem is that red is used in other places on the boat, so I'd have to figure out how to use red card there or match colors with paint. When I discover that it's impossible to achieve what I want through paint, I try the colored card stock route. I'm attempting to cut thin strips of paper to make the white bands this time around. I can cut them out, but gluing them on is likely to be a challenge. They're 0.5 mm wide.
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