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Old 07-18-2021, 08:20 PM
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1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2

An article about the World War I-era American Protective League civilian Justice Department auxiliary in the 22 July issue of the New York Review of Books includes an image of a primitive-looking truck (Image 1, below).

My initial impression was that it was a Jeffrey/Nash Quad (Image 2) or an F.W.D. Model B (Image 3). But further examination of images of WWI U.S. trucks convinces me that it was a Mack Type Two (Images 4 and 5). To me, the giveaway is the prominent Mack Type Two dashboard, not present on the Jeffrey and F.W.D. vehicles (Image 6).

Although the Mack Bulldog AC with its distinctive engine cover was the most widely-used Mack truck overseas in World War I, a lot of the old Type Twos (as well as the ABs with conventional hoods) remained in service on the home front.

Can anyone with more expertise on U.S. WWI-era trucks than I have confirm or correct this identification?

Sources of images:
1. New York Review of Books, 22 July 2021, page 35.
2. Wikipedia, available at Jeffery Quad - Wikipedia
3. FWD Model B Lorry, Landships, available at http://www.landships.info/landships/...D_Model_B.html (Apparently this article is from the old Landships on-line journal that still has a phantom existence on the Internet. I can't find this article or the image in the current Landships II.)
4 and 5. Albert Mroz, American Military Vehicles of World War I, Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2009, pp. 184, 238.

Don
Attached Thumbnails
1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-mack_truck_nyv_1918_nyrb_210722_p35r.jpg   1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-1024px-jeffery_quad_truck_with_u.s._marines_wikipediar.jpg   1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-fwd_model_b_2_landship.jpg   1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-mack_5-ton_type_two_tanker_1909_mroz_p184r.jpg   1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-mack_4-ton_type_two_bottlers_body_1910_mroz_p238r.jpg  

1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-mack_type_two_dashboardr.png  
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Old 07-18-2021, 09:57 PM
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Interesting.

I have always been interested in the trucks from this period but can contribute nothing in this particular instance. I await to see what develops!
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Old 07-18-2021, 10:21 PM
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Playing in Google found another candidate for manufacturer, Hewitt Motor Company, of 10 E. 31st St. NYC.
Found illustration with similar overall shape and near identical tire treads; in an illustration of a period ad on ebay and on pinterest but I'm not going to link to either of those websites.
Note that search results for Hewitt Motor Company overflow with todays HMC.

What I will link to is search results from the Detroit Public Library, results for Hewitt truck, which won't be exact match for truck which started this, but will show the manufacturer's existence,
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Last edited by southwestforests; 07-18-2021 at 10:32 PM.
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Old 07-18-2021, 10:44 PM
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Try:

Landships II

not entirely sure why the FWD article is in the UK section except that the vast majority of FWD trucks on the Western Front were British Army vehicles. The UK Govt purchased many of these vehicles from the outbreak of WW1.

Just about all the articles from the old Landships freeservers incarnation were converted with much new material added since the conversion in 2010.

I think the Hewitt truck, although superficially similar, was a smaller vehicle than the Mac truck.

Regards,

Charlie
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Old 07-19-2021, 06:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieC View Post
I think the Hewitt truck, although superficially similar, was a smaller vehicle than the Mac truck.
They did have a 5 ton size which looks to be in the length ballpark and maybe even is too long to be mystery truck.
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Old 07-19-2021, 07:18 AM
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Charlie - Thanks for correcting me on the provenance of the FWD article and for adding your expertise to this discussion.

southwestforests - Thanks for acquainting me with the Hewitt truck. I had never heard of it and am glad to add that information to my knowledge base. I have added an image, below, from the Society of Automotive Historians in Britain website (SLIDER: 1908 Hewitt Five-Ton Truck |). I agree that there is a similarity with the mystery vehicle, but, like the F.W.D., the Hewitt has a radiator in front of the driver and lacks the distinctive dashboard of the Mack and the mystery vehicle. Note that the driver is able to rest his foot on the top of the dashboard of the mystery vehicle and there is no visible radiator (which was apparently under the dashboard on the Mack machines).

There is a connection, however. According to Mroz, "When Mack merged with [American] Sauer and Hewitt, the founder of the latter company, Edward R. Hewitt, joined the ranks of the Mack team and became an important designer of Mack trucks, albeit briefly. He was responsible for the design of the AB Mack prior to his departure in 1914" (p. 236). So Hewitt designed the truck that was the basis for the New York National Guard B-1 armored car that I discussed in a recent thread: New York National Guard Mack B-1 1916 Armored Car

Kevin - It is always good to have the pleasure of your company. I hope Wayne shows up soon.

Don
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1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-slider-1908-hewitt-five-ton-truck-1000-sah.jpg  
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Old 07-19-2021, 08:01 AM
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Don - I have spent the afternoon hunting for a book I have on WW1 Trucks. To no avail! Will continue!
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Old 07-19-2021, 09:30 AM
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Don - I have looked at everything I can find, and I believe you are correct in identifying this as a Mack Type 2.

Evidence:
1. The dashboard as you so rightly point out.
2. Jeffrey/Nash Quad - no. The "Mack" cab distance between the dashboard and bulkhead is short - see the front passengers legs, unlike the Jeffrey/Nash Quad.
3. F.W.D. Model B - no. The chassis profile of the "Mack" underside between wheels is flat. The F.W.D. Model B has a "pitched" profile due to various torsion (?) rods.
4. Hewitt Truck - no. The Hewitt has a different under chassis side profile at the rear and also a different cab side profile. This is also clear in the Hewett picture you posted.

The Mack truck in question appears to be one of 1890 models and ID pointers I would say are as mentioned:

a) Dashboard
b) Cab length
c) Between wheel under chassis profile.
d) Rear end under chassis profile.
e) Wheelsets look standard as well (apart from on the Texaco Tanker rear wheels which are clearly strengthened), even down to 13 spokes per wheel (unlucky for punctures).

Below is another nice clear picture of an 1893 Mack (from which confirms the very standard appearance (apart from rear bodywork) as well.

The use of an old 1890's model at the home front would also make sense.

Picture from Mack Trucks "YEARS"
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1918 era COE Truck – Probably Mack Type 2-1893-mack.jpg  
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Old 07-19-2021, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Boose View Post
There is a connection, however. According to Mroz, "When Mack merged with [American] Sauer and Hewitt, the founder of the latter company, Edward R. Hewitt, joined the ranks of the Mack team and became an important designer of Mack trucks, albeit briefly.
Interesting!
I actually know close to nothing about early cars and trucks, those vehicles have never been as much of an interest as trains, planes, boats, and space rockets.
The one thing I know about Mack products is the locomotives they built.
An online reference, Mack Rail – The Locomotives - Modern Mack Truck General Discussion - BigMackTrucks.com
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Old 07-19-2021, 10:45 AM
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Haven't been able to find much info on pre-AB series trucks. See you already discovered the Hewitt connection. I do have the 100 Anniversary book on Mack but few photos of the early trucks. From what I did find will agree with your conclusion that it is a early Mack.
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